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Tex Box: VI

STRATEGIC GOAL SIX:

Protect American Society by Providing for the Safe, Secure, and Humane Confinement of Persons in Federal Custody

  

 

STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE & ANNUAL GOAL 6.1: DETENTION
Provide for the safe, secure and humane confinement of detained persons awaiting trail, sentencing, or immigraiton proceedings

6.1A Ensure Adequate, Cost Effective Detention Capacity

Background/ Program Objectives:

Historically, the USMS has administered the Federal Prisoner Detention (FPD) program for the federal government using funding appropriated specifically for the care of prisoners in federal custody.† In FY 2003, the Office of Federal Detention Trustee will assume the oversight of FPD program.† The FPD appropriation has provided financial support for the housing, subsistence, medical care, and medical guard service for federal detainees remanded to USMS custody.† The responsibility begins when a prisoner is brought into USMS custody.† It continues through the trial process, and ends when a prisoner is acquitted or arrives at a designated BOP facility to serve a sentence.† The USMS pre-trial population is generated by public policy and multi-component investigative and prosecutorial efforts within the DOJ or other federal law enforcement agencies. Since the USMS, like BOP, is at the receiving end of the federal law enforcement initiatives and efforts, the USMS has no control over the number of detainees remanded to its custody and has no option other than to house and care for the detainees.

Under the Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act of 1996 and other immigration laws, INS is authorized, and sometimes required, to detain illegal aliens to help facilitate their removal from the United States. INS administers a national detention program that uses funding appropriated specifically for the care of aliens arrested.† INS provides or obtains the transportation, housing, subsistence, medical care, and guard service for detainees held in INS custody.† The responsibility begins when a detainee is brought into INS custody and continues until the alien can be released into the community or removed from the United States. The detainee population is generated by multi-component investigative and prosecutorial efforts within the INS.† The detainee population consists of criminals, non-criminals, unaccompanied juveniles, and families, virtually all of whom are in administrative detention as opposed to criminal incarceration.† These categories normally require different levels of custodial care.† INS endeavors to place detainees into detention facilities that are appropriate for their custody category.†

Chart: Jail Day Costs [USMS]D

Data Collection and Storage: Data are maintained in 94 separate district Prisoner Tracking System (PTS) databases.† This information is downloaded monthly into a USMS Headquarters Access database, where it is maintained.† Jail rate information is maintained in the database and is updated when changes are made to contractual agreements.†

Data Validation and Verification: Monthly population data are validated and verified (for completeness, correct dates, trends, etc.) monthly by USMS Headquarters before being posted to the database.† Jail rate information is verified and validated against actual jail contracts.

Data Limitations: PTS is very time and labor intensive. Lack of a real-time centralized system results in data that is close to six weeks old before it is available at a national level. †

 

Everyday, the INS and USMS must provide adequate cost-effective and appropriate transportation and bed space for each of the different categories of individuals placed into custody.† Factors affecting where an individual is confined include: 1) the proximity of the facility to the federal courthouse; 2) the cost per bed; 3) health issues; 4) the amenability of a facility to detain aliens; 5) the security of the facility; and 6) if detention standards of confinement are being met.† INS routinely utilizes its own facilities, contract facilities, state and local government facilities, and contract juvenile facilities to house detainees.† Detention bed space for INS and USMS detainees are routinely acquired through a combination of: 1) Intergovernmental Agreements (IGAs), where a daily rate is paid; 2) Cooperative Agreement Programs (CAP) with state and local governments, where capital investment funding is provided in exchange for a guarantee of a certain number of bed spaces, for which a daily rate is paid when these bed spaces are used; 3) private contract facilities; and 4) INS or federal detention facilities, where the government must pay for construction and operation of the facility.

Performance:

Performance Measure: Jail Day Costs [USMS]
††††††††††† FY 2002 Target:† $61
††††††††††† FY 2002 Actual: $60
††††††††††† Discussion: FY 2002 end of year data indicates an average jail day rate of $60, 1.5% lower than the projected rate of $61.† This slight decrease in the average jail rate is primarily a result of a smaller than anticipated impact of the D.C. Revitalization Act on the Federal Prisoner Detention Account in FY 2002.

 

 

Chart: Per Capita Costs [INS]D

Data Collection and Storage: Data are collected in the Deportable Alien Control System (DACS).† DACS provides specific data about the detention stay of individual aliens.† INS collects data on the average daily alien population in custody through manual tracking validated against DACS.† The field consolidates statistics for each INS location and state and local jails used by INS on a weekly basis.† Headquarters consolidates the data into a report that contains aggregate population counts for specific categories of detainees.

Data Validation and Verification: The statistics are corroborated through submission audits and contact with field offices for missing information. DACS data validation and verification is described in the Interior Enforcement section of Strategic Goal Five.

Data Limitations: DACS data limitations are described in Strategic Goal Five.

 

Performance Measure: Per Capita Costs [INS]
††††††††††† FY 2002 Target: $75
††††††††††† FY 2002 Actual: $85
††††††††††† Discussion: Overall, costs for detaining aliens have increased.† This is especially the case as facilities strive toward compliance with the INS detention standards.† INS per capita detention costs are based on detention expenses divided by the number of bed days for the time period involved.† These expenses include transportation and medical costs in addition to the cost of detention alone. Also, per capita costs vary significantly between facilities due to the variability of population (gender, health and number), facility ages, local economic conditions, facility security level, etc.† What is commonly referred to as detention costs include bed, ground and air transportation (non-removal related), and medical costs.† These costs are used by local detention managers in determining bed usage and location; however, they are not indicative of program performance in meeting adequate and appropriate detention for the alien population custody.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6.1B Operate Facilities that are Safe and Secure

Background/ Program Objectives:

INS seeks the safe, secure, and humane treatment of detainees.† INS has the highest regard for human rights and public safety; therefore, it strives to maintain facilities that meet the accreditation standards of INS and correctional professions.† Professional accreditation and compliance with INS detention standards alone do not provide an indication of the safe and humane treatment of detainees.† Additional indicators are needed to track progress toward this objective.† INS will be reviewing its detention program to correct facility deficiencies and implement the changes necessary to achieve safe and humane detention facilities and detention methods for all detainees.†

INS developed and began to implement new service-wide Detention Standards in FY 2001.† Initial assessments of INS owned and

Chart: % of Facilities with ACA Accreditations (based on # of sites) [INS]D

Data Collection and Storage: ACA accreditation data reported are the findings, certifications, and recommendations of the accrediting agencies.

Data Validation and Verification: ACA accreditation data results from independent reports and certifications of the accrediting institution.

Data Limitations: None known at this time.

 

contracted facilities were completed in FY 2001 and will now be performed annually.† The results of these internal assessments will become the basis for specific facilitiesí improvements and for service-wide program changes where indicated.† Additionally, INS has committed to obtain American Corrections Association (ACA) accreditation for all of its owned and contracted facilities as expeditiously as practicable.†

Performance:

Performance Measure: Percent of INS Facilities with American Correctional Association (ACA) Accreditation [INS]
††††††††††† FY 2002 Target: 63%
††††††††††† FY 2002 Actual: 56%
††††††††††† Discussion: INS did not meet this target because one Service Processing Center, Florence, AZ, did not pass the re-accreditation review. This facility will be reviewed again in January 2003.

 


 

6.2 A Reduce Prison Crowding

Background/ Program Objectives:

Chart: % Crowding by Security Level [BOP]D

Data Definition:† The low, medium and high crowding levels are based on a mathematical ratio of the number of inmates divided by the rated capacity of the institutions at each of the specific security levels.†† Low security facilities: †double-fenced perimeters, mostly dormitory housing, and strong work/program components.† Medium security facilities: strengthened perimeters, mostly cell-type housing, work and treatment programs and a higher staff-to-inmate ratio than low security facilities.† High security facilities:† also known as U.S. Penitentiaries, highly secure perimeters, multiple and single cell housing, highest staff-to-inmate ratio, close control of inmate movement.†

Data Collection and Storage: Data are gathered from several computer systems. Inmate data is collected on the BOP on-line system (SENTRY); personnel data is collected from the National Finance Center (NFC) database, and financial data is collected on the Financial Management Information System (FMIS) and from field locations reporting on a regular basis. BOP also utilizes population forecast modeling in order to plan for future construction and contracting requirements to meet capacity needs.

Data Validation and Verification: Within BOP headquarters, staff in different divisions retrieve and verify data on a daily basis, analyze it, and formulate reports and projections.

Data Limitations: Due to the unpredictable environment in prisons and other external factors, there may often be discrepancies between projected and actual numbers contained in the performance graphs.† Most plans are developed based on historical data, past experience and joint agency efforts to project for the future.

 

While state and local incarceration growth rates have declined in recent years, BOP has experienced record growth: an increase of 10,027 inmates during FY 1998; over 11,373 in FY 1999; 11,436 in FY 2000; 11,447 in FY 2001; and 6,864 in FY 2002.† However, recent data from the Administrative Office of the U.S. Courts have indicated that while the Federal inmate population will continue to increase, the rate of growth will become somewhat slower.† BOP should now experience growth in the next few years of approximately 7,000 to 8,000 inmates per year rather than the average of 11,000 that occurred from 1998-2001.†

BOP constantly monitors facility capacity, population growth, and prisoner crowding.† As federal inmate population levels are projected to increase and continue to exceed the rated capacity of BOP, every possible action is being taken to protect the community, while keeping institutional crowding at manageable proportions to ensure that federal inmates continue to serve their sentences in a safe and humane environment.

Performance:
Performance Measure: % Crowding by Security Level [BOP]
††††††††††† FY 2002 Target: 40% Low; 50% Medium; 47% High
††††††††††† FY 2002 Actual: 42% Low; 58% Medium; 41% High
††††††††††† Discussion:† A contract delay for low security beds resulted in higher than anticipated crowding at low security BOP institutions; medium security BOP institutions were more crowded due to a delay in the planned mission change for Edgefield from high to medium security, and the new Petersburg FCI (medium security level) was not activated as rapidly as earlier planned; crowding at high security BOP institutions was lower as a result of Edgefield still housing high security inmates.

 

 

 

 

STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE & ANNUAL GOAL 6.3: PRISON OPERATIONS
Maintain and operate the federal prison system in a safe, secure, humane and efficient manner

6.3A Operate Facilities Efficiently

Background/ Program Objectives:

Chart: Per Capita Costs [BOP]D

Data Collection and Storage: The BOP collects and analyzes actual obligation data from the DOJ FMIS.† The actual obligation data are compared against the average daily population to determine the per capita costs.

Data Validation and Verification: Data are corroborated through contact with regional offices and prison facilities.†

Data Limitations: Information is limited by program/activity level and location.

 

The goal of the BOP Facilities Management Program is to ensure existing facilities are maintained in compliance with security, safety, applicable regulations, building codes, and industry standards.† Established in 1994, facility training has been offered to both line staff and managers to develop staff skill levels for present and future facilities operations.† The training program has assisted institutions in lowering operating costs by training staff to perform required testing and maintenance procedures in-house and require less contracting with outside resources.

BOP is currently participating in a joint interagency agreement with the General Services Administration National Utilities Management Program (NUMP).† The agreement provides authority to NUMP for negotiation and transportation of natural gas for use by BOP at various institutions. Institutions under the NUMP program will continue to receive the best possible price for gas regardless of fluctuations in the gas market.

Performance:

Performance Measure: Per Capita Costs [BOP]
††††††††††† FY 2002 Target: $63
††††††††††† FY 2002 Actual: $62
††††††††††† Discussion:† The BOP continues to hold per capita costs below the annual rate of inflation by using various cost containment initiatives, such as shared services at prison complexes and reduction of travel and equipment expenses.† During FY 2002, a second Federal Correctional Institution was activated at the Petersburg, VA site.† In addition, during FY 2002, more inmates were housed in BOP facilities, contributing to lower per capita costs than originally projected.

 

 

6.3B Operate Facilities that are Safe and Secure

Background/ Program Objectives:

 
Chart: % of BOP Facilities with ACA Accreditations [BOP]D

Data Collection and Storage: The data compiled by the BOP is gathered from three main computer systems: Inmate data are collected on the BOP on-line system (SENTRY); personnel data is collected from the National Finance Center (NFC) database, and financial data is collected on the Financial Management Information System (FMIS), and from field locations reporting on a regular basis.† The BOP relies on an in-house database in Microsoft Access to effectively track and manage modernization and repair projects (dates and costs).† All financial information is extracted from the FMIS system and entered into the database.

Data Validation and Verification: Within BOP headquarters, staff in different divisions retrieve and verify data on a daily basis, analyze it, and formulate reports and projections.

Data Limitations: Due to the unpredictable environment in prisons, there may often be discrepancies between projected and actual numbers contained in the performance graphs.† Most plans are developed based on historical data and past experience to project for the future.

* BOP has several correctional complexes that are comprised of two to five individual institutions.† In the past, each BOP facility was accredited separately including facilities at correctional complexes.† Effective in FY 2000, the BOPís goal is to have facilities that are located together accredited as one.† BOP strives to meet the goal that all institutions will be accredited within two years of activation.

One of DOJís most serious objectives is the safe, secure, and humane treatment of detainees and inmates.† The Department has the highest regard for human rights and public safety. Therefore, it strives to maintain facilities that meet the accreditation standards of several professional organizations.

BOP significantly reduces the possibility of escape with long-term emphasis on security enhancements, physical plant improvements, enhanced training, and increased emphasis on staff supervision of inmates.

Inmate idleness is the number one cause of inmate unrest and violence in prison.† Federal Prison Industries (FPI) is the most important correctional management inmate program in the Bureau of Prisons.† FPI employs and provides skills training and ensures the safe and secure operation of the institutions.† Not only does FPI play a vital role in the management of inmates, but it also improves the likelihood that inmates will remain crime-free upon their release from BOP facilities.† A comprehensive study conducted by BOP demonstrated that FPI provides inmates with an opportunity to develop work ethics and skills, contributes substantially to lower recidivism, and increases job-related success of inmates upon their release.

Performance:

Performance Measure: % of BOP Facilities with ACA Accreditations [BOP]
††††††††††† FY 2002 Target: 93%
††††††††††† FY 2002 Actual: 95%
††††††††††† Discussion: During FY 2002, the target was exceeded due to two institutions being accredited ahead of schedule.† Additionally, three facilities received initial accreditation. The BOP continues to strive to the meet the goal that all facilities will be accredited within two years of activation.† Each year new facilities are activating which affects the percentages of facilities that can be reviewed.

Performance Measure: Escapes from Secure Prisons [BOP]
††††††††††† FY 2002 Target:† 0
††††††††††† FY 2002 Actual:† 0
††††††††††† Discussion:† Despite increasingly sophisticated and dangerous inmates, there were no escapes from the BOPís 91 secure prisons during FY 2002.† The BOP utilizes strategies to prevent escapes emphasizing enhanced training, intelligence gathering, sanctions, identification, detection, and deterrence.

Data Definition: Assaults includes assaults between inmates and inmates and inmates and staff.

Data Collection and Storage: Data are gathered from three main computer systems. Inmate data is collected on the BOP on-line system (SENTRY); Personnel data is collected from the National Finance Center (NFC) database, and Financial data is collected on the Financial Management Information System (FMIS) and from field locations reporting on a regular basis.† The BOP relies on an in-house database on Microsoft Access to effectively track and manage modernization and repair projects (dates and costs).† All financial information is extracted from the FMIS system and entered into the database.

Data Validation and Verification: Within BOP headquarters, staff in different divisions retrieve and verify data on a daily basis, analyze it, and formulate reports and projections.

Data Limitations: Due to the unpredictable environment in prisons, there may often be discrepancies between projected and actual numbers contained in the performance graphs.† Most plans are developed based on historical data and past experience to project for the future.

 

Performance Measure: Inmate Assaults and Homicides [BOP] (NOTE: While it is the objective of the Department to eliminate all assaults and homicides, the targets reflect predictions based solely on historical data.)
††††††††††† FY 2002 Target:† 3,074 Assaults;
††††††††††† 5 Homicides
††††††††††† FY 2002 Actual:† 2,819 Assaults;
††††††††††† 3 Homicides
††††††††††† Discussion: †Every reasonable precaution is taken to ensure that all inmates are provided with a safe and secure environment during incarceration by placing inmates in facilities according to their security needs.† The lower number of assaults and homicides than projected during FY 2002 is attributed in part to use of cameras and closed-circuit video recording equipment, which act as deterrents to misconduct, assaults, and homicides within institutions.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE & ANNUAL GOAL 6.4: INMATE SERVICES
Provide services and programs to facilitate inmates' successful reintegration into society, consistent with community expectations and standards

6.4A Provide Work and Education Programs

Chart: % of Inmates with a GED/High School Diploma-7 Months Prior to Release [BOP]D

Data Collection and Storage: Inmate data are collected on the BOP on-line system (SENTRY); personnel data is collected on the National Finance Center (NFC system); and financial data on the Financial Management Information System (FMIS). BOP relies on the BOP inmate tracking system (SENTRY) in order to identify and track inmates in work, education, and recreation programs.† Reports on education and other programs are extracted from the SENTRY database, generally on a quarterly basis.† One exception to this is the General Education Diploma (GED) program completion reporting that is provided by the American Council on Education, a non-profit agency, through its GED testing services.† GED completions are reported to BOP headquarters with copies to institution and regional education personnel.

Data Validation and Verification: Within BOP headquarters, staff in different divisions retrieve and verify data on a daily basis, analyze it, and formulate reports and projections.

Data Limitations: Due to the unpredictable environment in prisons and other external factors, there may often be discrepancies between projected and actual numbers contained in the performance graphs. Most plans are based on historical data, past experience, and joint agency efforts to project for the future.

 
Chart: Number of Inmates Completing at least One Vocational Program [BOP]D

Data Collection and Storage: Data are gathered from three main computer systems. Inmate data is collected on the BOP on-line system (SENTRY); Personnel data is collected from the National Finance Center (NFC); and financial data on the Financial Management Information System (FMIS). BOP relies on the BOP inmate tracking system (SENTRY) in order to identify and track inmates in work, education, and recreation programs.† Reports on education and other programs are extracted from the SENTRY database, generally on a quarterly basis.

Data Validation and Verification: Within BOP headquarters, staff in different divisions retrieve and verify data on a daily basis, analyze it, and formulate reports and projections.

Data Limitations: Due to the unpredictable environment in prisons and other external factors, there may often be discrepancies between projected and actual numbers contained in the performance graphs. Most plans are based on historical data, past experience, and joint agency efforts to project for the future. Data using the new reporting procedures were available for the 3rd and 4th quarter only of FY 2002.† An actual number was provided by multiplying this half-year figure by two.† Full transition to the new reporting system will occur in FY 2003.

 

Background/ Program Objectives:

BOP plays a vital role in federal law enforcement, not only by incarcerating offenders, but also in helping to break the cycle of crime.† First and foremost, BOP protects public safety by ensuring that federal offenders serve their sentences.† Through imprisonment, BOP helps deter criminal activity by showing actual and potential offenders the consequences of crime.† To help break the cycle of crime, BOP provides a range of educational and vocational training programs and counseling to assist inmates in successful transition to the community upon release.

BOP provides work and education programs and other self-improvement opportunities to assist offenders in becoming law-abiding citizens. The BOP Post-Release Employment Study (PREP) demonstrated that these programs could lead to lower recidivism and improve institutional security by reducing inmate idleness.

Performance:

Performance Measure: % Inmates with a GED/High School Diploma, 7 Months Prior to Release [BOP]
††††††††††† FY 2002 Target:† 66%
††††††††††† FY 2002 Actual:† 64%
††††††††††† Discussion:† Changes to GED tests in FY 2002 resulted in a slightly lower than anticipated rate of completion for all inmates.

Performance Measure: Number of Inmates Completing at Least One Vocational Program [BOP]
††††††††††† FY 2002 Target:† 9,491
††††††††††† FY 2002 Actual:† 10,190
††††††††††† Discussion:† Beginning in May 2000, new program completion procedures were established for vocational training, advanced occupational training and college programs.† New reporting procedures prevent college data from impacting occupational data and establish clear criteria defining when a program (as opposed to individual courses) has been completed, which will ensure accuracy of data reported.†††

 

6.4B Provide Residential Drug Treatment Programs to Eligible Inmates

Background/ Program Objectives:

Chart: 100% of Eligible Inmates Enrolled in Residential Treatment [BOP]D

Data Collection and Storage: Data are gathered from three main computer systems. Inmate data is collected on the BOP on-line system (SENTRY); Personnel data is collected from the National Finance Center (NFC); and financial data on the financial Management Information System (FMIS). BOP relies on the BOP inmate tracking system (SENTRY) in order to identify and track inmates in work, education, and recreation programs.† Reports on education and other programs are extracted from the SENTRY database, generally on a quarterly basis.

Data Validation and Verification: Within BOP headquarters, staff in different divisions retrieve and verify data on a daily basis, analyze it, and formulate reports and projections.

Data Limitations: Due to the unpredictable environment in prisons and other external factors, there may often be discrepancies between projected and actual numbers contained in the performance graphs. Most plans are based on historical data, past experience, and joint agency efforts to project for the future. Data using the new reporting procedures were available for the 3rd and 4th quarter only of FY 2002.† An actual number was provided by multiplying this half-year figure by two.† Full transition to the new reporting system will occur in FY 2003.

 

The Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act (VCCLEA) of 1994 requires BOP to provide appropriate substance abuse treatment for 100 % of ďeligibleĒ inmates by the end of FY 1997 and each year thereafter.† To be eligible for treatment the prisoner must be: sentenced to BOP custody; determined by BOP to have a substance abuse disorder; residing in a BOP institution; and be within 24 to 36 months of release.† An estimated 34% of the sentenced federal inmate population has a substance abuse disorder and requires some type of drug abuse treatment.

In response to the rapid growth in the federal inmate population with drug abuse histories, BOP developed a comprehensive drug abuse treatment strategy consisting of four components: drug abuse education; non-residential drug abuse treatment programs; residential drug abuse treatment programs; and transitional drug abuse treatment services.

Performance:

Performance Measure: 100% of Eligible Inmates Enrolled in Residential Drug Treatment [BOP]
††††††††††† FY 2002 Target: 16,000 Enrolled
††††††††††† FY 2002 Actual: 16,243 Enrolled
††††††††††† Discussion:† The VCCLEA requires the BOP to provide residential substance abuse treatment for 100% of eligible inmates.† There are 50 residential drug abuse programs throughout the BOP, with a waiting list of more than 6,000 inmates.† Typically inmates are selected for the program based on their projected release date.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6.4C Provide Cost Effective Quality Inmate Health Care

Background/ Program Objectives:

Chart: Discontinued Measure: Daily Per Capita Medical Costs [BOP]D

Data Collection and Storage: Data are gathered from several computer systems. Inmate data is collected on the BOP on-line system (SENTRY); personnel data is collected from the National Finance Center (NFC) database; financial data is collected on the Financial Management Information System (FMIS), and from field locations reporting on a regular bases. BOP also utilizes population forecast modeling in order to plan for future construction and contracting requirements to meet capacity needs.

Data Validation and Verification: Within BOP headquarters, staff in different divisions retrieve and verify data on a daily basis, analyze it, and formulate reports and projections.

Data Limitations: While the data is both timely and reliable, there is little data available for comparison in this area.† However, costs appear to reflect effective efforts at control escalating health care costs.

 

In support of the DOJís objective to provide cost effective quality health care to inmates, the BOP strives to meet the accreditation standards of the

Joint Commission on Accreditation of Health Care Organizations (JCAHO), at all correctional facilities.† Meeting these standards provides a method of assessing the quality of health care provided at BOP facilities.† BOPís goal is to have institutions accredited within two years of activation.† By meeting JCAHO accreditation standards, each BOP institution must exhibit substantial compliance with approximately 200 health care standards during a triennial JCAHO accreditation survey.† DOJ has the highest regard for Constitutional and human rights; therefore, it strives to maintain correctional facilities that ensure inmates receive humane health care treatment that is not indifferent to their health care needs.†

JCAHO standards not only address patientís rights, but also provide BOP the opportunity to assess and improve the overall efficiency of health care programs.† The foundation of JCAHO standards is the continuous quality improvement of health care processes and patient outcomes.† By improving its health care efficiency, the BOP seeks to improve quality and control costs.

 

 

 

 

Chart: New Measure: % Eligible BOP Facilities with JCAHO Accreditation [BOP]D

Data Collection and Storage: Data are gathered from several computer systems. Inmate data is collected on the BOP on-line system (SENTRY); personnel data is collected from the National Finance Center (NFC) database; financial data is collected on the Financial Management Information System (FMIS), and from field locations reporting on a regular bases. BOP also utilizes population forecast modeling in order to plan for future construction and contracting requirements to meet capacity needs.

Data Validation and Verification: Within BOP headquarters, staff in different divisions retrieve and verify data on a daily basis, analyze it, and formulate reports and projections.

Data Limitations: Due to the unpredictable environment in prisons, there may often be discrepancies between projected and actual numbers contained in the performance graphs.† Most plans are developed based on historical data and past experience to project for the future.

 

Performance:

Performance Measure: DISCONTINUED MEASURE: Daily Per Capita Medical Costs
††††††††††† FY 2002 Target:† $8.03
††††††††††† FY 2002 Actual: $8.30
††††††††††† Discussion: This data is included in overall per-capita reported under 6.3A, Operate Facilities Efficiently

Performance Measure: NEW MEASURE: Percent Eligible BOP Facilities with JCAHO Accreditation
††††††††††† FY 2002 Target:† 98%
††††††††††† FY 2002 Actual: 98%
††††††††††† Discussion: During fiscal year 2002 the BOP met its accreditation goal of 98%.† The BOP continues to strive to meet the goal that all institutions are accredited within two years of activation.† Each year new institutions are activating which affects the percentages of facilities that can be reviewed.

 

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