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National Drug Intelligence Center
      
Product No. 2004-L0559-007

September 2004

Fast Facts Index

Cover image linked to printable BZP Fast Facts brochure.

Background photo John Foxx Images:
Cover photo NDIC.

Printable brochure (69 KB pdf)

BZP
Fast Facts

Questions and Answers 

     - What is BZP?
     - What does BZP look like?
     - How is BZP used?
     - Who abuses BZP? 
     - What are the risks?
     - What is it called?
     - Is BZP illegal?

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National Drug Intelligence Center
a component of the 
U.S. Department of Justice.

   
W
hat is BZP?

BZP is a common name for the synthetic drug N-benzylpiperazine, a stimulant that produces euphoria and cardiovascular effects and is approximately 10 to 20 times less potent than amphetamine in producing these effects. BZP tablets, especially those that also contain the hallucinogen TFMPP (1-(3-trifluoromethylphenyl)piperazine), often are sold as MDMA (3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine, also known as ecstasy) or promoted as an alternative to MDMA.

 

What does BZP look like?

BZP typically is available as a powder, which may be packaged in small glass or plastic vials or in small plastic resealable bags. BZP powder often is pressed into tablets, many of which are embossed with logos. BZP is occasionally available in capsules.

Photograph of several round, white pills with a stamped image of a Smurf.
PA Bureau of Narcotics Investigation (BNI)

Photograph of 4 round, white pills stamped with three diamond shapes forming a triangle.
Porrata Consulting

 

How is BZP used?

BZP usually is consumed orally. The drug also can be snorted or smoked, but these methods of administration are less common. Common oral dosages of BZP range from 20 to 200 milligrams. The effects of BZP generally last from 6 to 8 hours.

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Who abuses BZP?   

BZP primarily is abused by teenagers and young adults. The drug often is used at raves, nightclubs, private parties, and other venues where the use of club drugs, particularly MDMA, is well established.

            

What are the risks?

The risks associated with BZP abuse are similar to those associated with amphetamine abuse. Stimulants, including BZP and amphetamine, decrease appetite, dilate pupils, and increase blood pressure and heart and respiration rates. Other effects include anxiety, blurred vision, dizziness, and insomnia. Chronic abuse of stimulants can cause irregular heartbeat and can lead to delusions, hallucinations, and paranoia. 

Compounding these risks is the uncertainty of the BZP dosage in a particular tablet, capsule, or quantity of powder--high dosages can cause overdoses. Further, BZP tablets often contain additional substances. Laboratory testing of some tablets that contained BZP showed that the tablets also contained TFMPP, cocaine, and dextromethorphan (DXM). 

        

What is it called?

The most common street terms for BZP are listed below.

Street Terms for BZP

1-benzylpiperazine

A2

Frenzy

Nemesis

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Is BZP illegal?

Yes, BZP is illegal. In March 2004 the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) designated BZP a Schedule I substance under the Controlled Substances Act. Schedule I drugs, which include heroin and MDMA, have a high potential for abuse and serve no legitimate medical purpose in the United States.

      

Other products of interest:

Check out Fast Facts on:

  • 5-MeO-AMT
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  • Crack cocaine
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  • Triple C
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Also available from NDIC:

  • Huffing--The Abuse of Inhalants
  • Prescription Drug Abuse and Youth
  • Drugs, Youth, and the Internet

For more information on illicit drugs check out our web site at: www.usdoj.gov/ndic.  Call 814-532-4541 to request NDIC products.

  

Contact us

Our addresses:

National Drug Intelligence Center
319 Washington Street, 5th Floor
Johnstown, PA 15901-1622

Tel. (814) 532-4601
FAX (814) 532-4690
E-mail NDIC.Contacts@usdoj.gov

National Drug Intelligence Center
United States Department of Justice
Robert F. Kennedy Building (Room 3341)
950 Pennsylvania Avenue NW
Washington, DC 20530-2000

Tel. (202) 432-4040
FAX (202) 514-4252

NDIC publications are available on the following web sites:

ADNET:  http://ndicosa.adnet.sgov.gov/index.htm
DOJ:  http://www.usdoj.gov/archive/ndic/
LEO:  https://www.leo.gov/http://leowcs.leopriv.gov/lesig/archive/ndic/index.htm
RISS:  ndic.riss.net

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