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NDIC seal linked to Home page. National Drug Intelligence Center
Georgia Drug Threat Assessment
April 2003

Outlook

Cocaine, particularly crack, likely will remain the greatest illicit drug threat to Georgia, primarily because of the high demand for and ready availability of the drug. The level of violence associated with crack cocaine distribution and abuse will continue to contribute to the magnitude of the threat. However, in some rural areas of the state, primarily in northern Georgia, methamphetamine availability and abuse have surpassed cocaine as the primary drug threat. Mexican criminal groups with well-established transportation and distribution networks will remain the dominant suppliers and wholesale distributors of powdered cocaine in the state. Distributors within the state will continue to convert most of the powdered cocaine to crack for retail distribution. African American and Hispanic gangs likely will remain heavily involved in the retail distribution of crack cocaine.

Marijuana will continue to be the most widely available and commonly abused illicit drug in Georgia. Marijuana produced in Mexico likely will remain the most common type available; however, marijuana produced locally will be readily available as well. In some larger metropolitan areas such as Atlanta, specialty types of marijuana such as chocolate-flavored marijuana may gain in popularity. Mexican criminal groups--with their established transportation and distribution networks--will remain the primary transporters and wholesale distributors of marijuana produced in Mexico. Various gangs and local independent dealers will continue to be the primary marijuana retail distributors in the state.

The production, availability, and abuse of methamphetamine may increase in Georgia. In some areas of the state, principally in northern Georgia, methamphetamine availability and abuse have surpassed cocaine as the primary drug threat. However, statewide abuse levels will remain well below those for cocaine and marijuana. Methamphetamine produced in Mexico, California, and southwestern states will continue to be the predominant type of methamphetamine available in the state. Mexican criminal groups will remain the primary methamphetamine suppliers, distributing wholesale quantities to criminal groups, local independent dealers, OMGs, and gangs that sell midlevel and retail level quantities of the drug. Local methamphetamine production likely will continue to increase based on equipment and dumpsite seizure statistics.

The availability and abuse of heroin likely will remain at low levels in Georgia except in metropolitan areas, principally Atlanta. South American heroin will continue to be the type of heroin most commonly available and abused in the state. Mexican criminal groups will remain the primary transporters and wholesale distributors of South American heroin, although Colombian and Dominican criminal groups also will continue to transport and sell wholesale quantities of South American heroin. African American, Caucasian, Dominican, and Mexican criminal groups as well as local independent dealers will remain the principal retail distributors of heroin in Georgia.

The availability and abuse of other dangerous drugs--particularly MDMA and OxyContin--likely will increase. State and local law enforcement officials report that abuse levels for these drugs are increasing, and there are no indications that this trend will subside. However, these drugs will remain a lesser drug threat to the state than cocaine, marijuana, methamphetamine, and heroin.

 


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