Figure One compares federal weapons and firearms offenders convicted and sentenced in 1992 and 1999.  In 1992, 1036 offenders were sentenced to between 13 and 35 months in prison, compared to 669 offenders in 1999.  In 1992, 578 offenders were sentenced to between 38 and 60 months, compared to 665 offenders in 1999.  Finally, in 1992, 1049 offenders were sentenced to more than 60 months in prison, compared to 1499 offenders in 1992.  back to main text
 

Figure Two shows that 30,290 state and federal weapons offenders were convicted in 1992.  34,242 offenders were convicted in 1994.  36,647 offenders were convicted in 1996. back to main text
 

Figure Three tracks the decrease between 1992 and 1998 in the number of violent crimes -- not including rape -- that were committed with firearms.  In 1992, 565,575 violent crimes were committed using firearms.  This number rose to 581,697 in 1993, and then fell for five consecutive years.  In 1994, 452,529 crimes were committed.  In 1995, 514,421 crimes were committed.  In 1996, 458,458 crimes were committed.  In 1997, 414,530 crimes were committed.  Lastly, in 1998, 364,776 violent crimes were committed with firearms.  back to main text
 

Figure Four shows the decrease that occurred in firearms homicides in Boston, Massachusetts between 1995 and 1999.  In 1995, 64 firearms homicides were committed.  In 1996, 38 firearms homicides were committed.  In 1997, 25 firearms homicides were committed.  In 1998, 26 firearms homicides were committed.  And in 1999, 17 firearms homicides were committed.  back to main text
 

Figure Five shows the decrease that occurred in firearms homicides in Minneapolis, Minnesota between 1996 and 1999.  In 1996, 53 firearms homicides were committed.  In 1997, 37 firearms homicides were committed.  In 1998, 34 firearms homicides were committed.  And in 1999, 28 firearms homicides were committed.  back to main text
 

Figure Six shows the decrease that occurred in firearms homicides in Richmond, Virginia between 1990 and 1999.  The numbers were fairly constant between 1990 and 1993 with 93 homicides committed in 1990, 94 homicides in 1991, 98 homicides in 1992, and 95 homicides in 1993.  In 1994, 142 firearms homicides were committed.  In 1995, 106 homicides were committed.  In 1996, 87 firearms homicides were committed.  On February 1, 1997, Project Exile began in Virginia.  In 1997, 122 firearms homicides were committed.  In 1998, 78 firearms homicides were committed.  And in 1999, 60 firearms homicides were committed.  back to main text
 

Figure Seven is a picture of a bumper sticker for PROJECT I.C.E., sponsored by the Birmingham Police, the U.S. Attorney, the District Attorney, and the ATF.  The bumper sticker is approximately 12 inches wide and 5 inches tall.  The left half of the sticker is black, and the right half is red.  A picture of a handgun appears in the upper right corner.  The following message appears in white letters:  Get rid of your illegal gun.  Or go to jail.  Period.  back to main text
 

Figure Eight is a chart showing gun crime reduction in High Point, North Carolina between 1997 and 1999.  328 crimes were committed in 1997, 239 crimes were committed in 1998, and 163 crimes were committed in 1999.  back to main text
 

Figure Nine is a pie graph showing FBI Percentage of Denials by Category.  The chart shows that 66 percent of all denials resulted from the applicant having a criminal history of one or more felony crimes.  14 percent of all denials resulted from the applicant having a criminal history of one or more domestic violence misdemeanors.  7 percent of all denials resulted from multiple DUIs or non-NCIC warrants.  5 percent of all denials resulted from the applicant having a criminal history of drug abuse.  4 percent of all denials resulted from the applicant having a current domestic violence restraining order.  3 percent of denials were given to applicants who were fugitives from justice.  The final one percent of denials were given to unlawful aliens and individuals with dishonorable discharges. back to main text