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Comment No.: REW-0165
Received: 10/23/2005
Organization:  
Commenter: Camp, Gregg
State: CA
Attachments: None


Comments:

From: GCampRltr@aol.com [mailto:GCampRltr@aol.com]
Sent: Sunday, October 23, 2005 12:01 PM
To: ATR-Real Estate Workshop
Subject: MLS

Hi, I am a local broker in California. We have had numerous changes to our MLS in the last 10 years. We continue to evolve as we see changes in technology or as the customers needs change. We pay for our own and are not public, nor should we be a public utility or entity.

We brokers each determine in our area what is the best way we can work to maximize our resources and maintain control of our assets. Our knowledge and information is what we have as assets. How we use those to create a living is our choice, and should be. Each region is different and the needs and means of achieving their goals for a living should be made at that level. The compensation is very competitive. It is about the only business model which is completely compensation driven based upon completion of a sale. The MLS allows us achieve a balance between respecting the rights of listing brokers so they will continue to be willing to contribute their inventory of listings and permitting cooperating brokers the ability to show those listings. The compensation offered is determined by the brokers. I will not show low priced listings when there are others that will pay me more. I can be assured of receiving compensation though when I bring about a successful sale.

The discount brokerages have a place, but the market uses them when it is hot and they fade away when the market becomes normal. There are tremendous costs in this business. No sale, no money, regardless how much time you spent with a buyer or seller. If anything the bar should be raised higher to make it more difficult to get into this field. The discount brokerages when they do not perform (no money for advertising) tarnish the field as well as the new agents. People want results and expect that when they sign with an agent or brokerage. Lack of knowledge on what to expect and lack of performance because one buys a cheap (discount) product leads to dissatisfactions in the market place. Most I think, will gladly pay for quality as they know the value is not instantaneous, but over time. This is not a get quick fast business, though like the stock market in a small way, one can. This is a business that takes time, hard effort,honesty,risk and a willingness to work any of the 24 hours a day 7 days a week.

You don't see every bored housewife or laid off factory worker going to sell insurance, cars, or stocks every time there is an economic change. All the newbies create problems as they flood the market, get in, then go out of business as they realize 100% compensation and the fact this a real job and they can't just make a killing. We work hard and take great risks. There should be more education and higher standards so people realize this is a real profession and not a stopping over point. People don't just decide I'll be a nurse and all jump in and be nurses. It is the fast buck and uninitiated that try to make a profession, just a job, without understanding what they are getting into. The grass always seems greener, I wish people knew what they were really in for and it wasn't so easy for them to get in and tarnish our reputations, and get out.

Gregg Camp, Realtor, California