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Volunteer Internship Opportunities

DOJ Agencies | U.S. Attorneys’ Offices (USAOs)
Summer 2014

Unless otherwise specified in a particular announcement below, these are all volunteer positions (without compensation). Some positions may be eligible for academic credit or work study depending on the policies of the applicant's law school.

Some DOJ agencies make their selection decisions on a rolling basis, i.e., they consider applications as received and may make offers throughout the application period and prior to their respective deadlines listed below. We therefore encourage applicants to apply as early as possible. Application requirements vary by agency, so please refer to specific agency descriptions and entries below for details.

Click on the name of the agency for details.

Participating DOJ Agency Location(s) Deadline(s)* Indicates selection made on a rolling basis
Access to Justice Washington, D.C. February 1
Antitrust Division Washington, D.C., Chicago, and New York February 28
Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) Washington, D.C. January 15
Civil Division    
Appellate Staff Washington, D.C. January 15
Civil Division Washington, D.C. See Entry
Consumer Protection Branch Washington, D.C. Open on a rolling basis
Federal Programs Branch Washington, D.C. See Entry
Office of Immigration Litigation, Appellate Section Washington, D.C. Spring - Sep 27
Summer - January 15
Office of Foreign Litigation Washington, D.C. Open on a rolling basis
Office of Vaccine Litigation Washington, D.C. January 18
Torts Branch Staff
         Ad is being updated
Washington, D.C. January 31 **
Torts Branch
         Constitutional Torts
Washington, D.C. February 21
Civil Rights Division Washington, D.C. See entry
Criminal Division    
Appellate Section Washington, D.C. January 15
Asset Forfeiture & Money Laundering Section Washington, D.C. February 1
Capital Case Unit Washington, D.C. March 1**
Child Exploitation and Obscenity Section Washington, D.C. January 31
Computer Crime & Intellectual Property Section Washington, D.C. January 18
Fraud Section Washington, D.C. January 31
Human Rights and Special Prosecution Section Washington, D.C. February 1** 
Narcotics and Dangerous Drug Section Washington, D.C. Winter/Spring - Oct 15
Fall- June 1
Summer - January 15
Office of Enforcement Operations (OEO) Washington, D.C. February 15
Office of International Affairs Washington, D.C. February 15**
Office of Overseas Prosecutorial Development, Assistance And Training (OPDAT) Washington, D.C. November 15
Organized Crime and Gang Section Washington, D.C. September – January**
Public Integrity Section Washington, D.C. January 15
Drug Enforcement Administration
Office of Chief Counsel Arlington, VA January 1
Environment and Natural Resources Division Washington, D.C.; Denver, CO; Sacramento, CA; Boston, MA; Seattle, WA; (openings vary at each site). January 1**
Environmental Enforcement Section Washington, D.C. See entry **
San Francisco Field Office San Francisco, CA January 18
Executive Office for U.S. Attorneys Washington, D.C. metropolitan area February 1
Federal Bureau of Prisons Washington, D.C. February 13
National Security Division    
Counterterrorism Section Washington, D.C. December 15, 2013
Foreign Investment Review Staff Washington, D.C. February 22
Office of Law and Policy Washington, D.C. December 15
Office of Justice For Victims of Overseas
          Terrorism
Washington, D.C. Summer:  January 31
Office of Dispute Resolution Washington, D.C. March 1
Office of Information Policy Washington, D.C. See entry
Office of Justice Programs    
The Bureau of Justice Assistance Washington, D.C. March 1
Office of Civil Rights Washington, D.C. February 1st
Office of Legal Counsel Washington, D.C. Summer: January 31
Office of Legal Policy Washington, D.C. Open until filled
Office of Legislative Affairs Washington, D.C. No earlier than February 1
Office of Privacy and Civil Liberties Washington, D.C. February 15
Office of Professional Responsibility Washington, D.C. January 30
Office of the Solicitor General Washington, D.C. February 15
Office of the Pardon Attorney Washington, D.C. March 1
Office of Tribal Justice Washington, DC January 15
Tax Division Washington, D.C. February 15
U.S. Marshals Service    
Office of General Counsel Arlington, VA
(Crystal City)
February 15
U.S. Trustee Program Washington, D.C.
Field offices nationwide
February 28
 
ACCESS TO JUSTICE INITIATIVE
950 Pennsylvania Ave. NW, Room 3340
Washington, D.C. 20530
ATTN: Stephan P. Matthews
E-mail: stephan.p.matthews@usdoj.gov
The Access to Justice Initiative (ATJ) was launched in March 2010 to improve access to justice for all Americans, regardless of status, income, or wealth. This includes: improving the availability and quality of indigent defense; enhancing civil legal representation for those without great wealth, including the middle class as well as the poor; focusing with special care upon the legal needs of the most vulnerable among us, including immigrants, juveniles, the homeless, disabled veterans, and victims of domestic and sexual violence; working with Federal, state, and tribal judiciaries to strengthen fair, impartial, and independent adjudication; promoting less lawyer-intensive and court-intensive solutions to legal problems; exchanging information with foreign ministries of justice and judicial systems on our respective efforts to improve access; and encouraging the development of more thoroughly evidence-based solutions to problems in the delivery of legal services.
Projected No. of Volunteers: 2
Internship Location(s): Washington, D.C.
Application Materials: Applications should be emailed to stephan.p.matthews@usdoj.gov and include a cover letter briefly describing interest and any relevant course or work experience, along with a resume.
Qualifications: Completion of first year of law school.
Application Deadlines: February 1, 2014
Minimum Weeks Required: 8 weeks 
Academic credit: ATJ will comply with all school requirements for earning academic credit.
Assignments: Students will work on a range of projects involving the crisis in access to quality legal assistance for people unable to afford an attorney for their civil and criminal justice problems. Assignments will vary, though students will primarily do legal research and writing projects, attend meetings within the Justice Department and partner agencies and organizations, and generally be integrated into the work of the office to the extent possible. (This office does no litigation, investigation or enforcement work.)
 
 
ANTITRUST DIVISION
450 5th Street NW, Suite 3407
Washington, D.C. 20530
ATTN: Debbie Wood
Telephone: (202) 514-0668
Fax: (202) 514-0580
E-mail: ATR.PERSONNEL@USDOJ.GOV(Email Preferred)
The Antitrust Division is responsible for enforcing federal laws designed to ensure that our nation's markets are free and open to robust competition. The Division engages in both civil and criminal litigation, and its work ranges over the entire spectrum of the U.S. economy. The Division has in recent years focused on prosecution of large international cartels involving multinational firms and Fortune 500 firms.
Projected No. of Volunteers: 20
Internship Location(s): Washington, D.C., Chicago, New York, and San Francisco
Application Materials: Please submit a cover letter (including dates available and geographic preference), resume, law school transcript (official or unofficial), and writing sample. Please attach the above material in an E-mail and forward it to the attention of Debbie Wood at ATR.PERSONNEL@USDOJ.GOV
Qualifications: First-year (second semester only), second- or third-year law students. Must be a U.S. Citizen.
Application Deadlines: February 28
Minimum Weeks Required: Six (6) Weeks
Academic credit: Course credit is available depending on school requirements.
Assignments: Assist in trials and hearings; review documents; prepare legal memoranda and briefs; attend depositions; work closely with attorneys conducting investigations; present legal research in a group setting; prepare assistance requests for foreign governments; conduct interviews of national and international subjects.
 
 
BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, FIREARMS AND EXPLOSIVES (ATF)
99 New York Avenue, N.E.,
Washington, D.C. 20226
ATTN: Intern Division
Telephone: (202) 648-7000
Fax: (202) 648-9620
E-mail: CHIEFCOUNSEL-INTERNSHIPS@ATF.GOV (Email Preferred)
The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) is a Bureau of the United States Department of Justice (DOJ). ATF is responsible for enforcing and administering the Federal Gun Control Act, the National Firearms Act, provisions of the Arms Export Control Act, and various Federal explosives laws and cigarette trafficking laws and arson laws-with a primary mission of preventing violent crime. As a small agency with broad interrelated missions involving law-enforcement, regulatory, counterterrorism, alcohol and tobacco diversion, and homeland-security concerns, ATF affords interns with opportunities to experience a variety of legal disciplines in a dynamic environment. ATF's Office of Chief Counsel consists of approximately 80 attorneys who provide legal advice and services to the Bureau nationwide in support of programs and operations. Headquarters attorneys are divided into 4 practice groups, including: Litigation; Administrative Law and Ethics; Field Operations and Information; and Firearms, Explosives, and Arson. ATF lawyers also are based in field offices in major cities throughout the country, including New York, Chicago, Dallas, Miami, and Los Angeles, where they work directly with ATF agents and investigators on active cases.
Projected No. of Volunteers: 2-4
Internship Location(s): Washington, D.C.
Application Materials: Please submit a cover letter (including dates available and any additional geographic locations) and resume. Please attach the above material in an E-mail with “Summer 2012” in the subject line and forward it to CHIEFCOUNSEL-INTERNSHIPS@ATF.GOV. If you have questions about your application, email is the preferred method of contact.    
Qualifications: First-year (second semester) and second-year law students. Students who are interested in performing effective research and analysis of legal issues relating to criminal laws governing alcohol, tobacco, firearms and explosives as well as issues related to the regulation of the firearms and explosives industries are encouraged to apply. ATF Headquarters also seeks students who have a broad interest in law enforcement and regulatory policy and techniques and areas of law common to many government agencies, such as employment law, litigation and disclosure law.  Must be a U.S. Citizen. 
Application Deadlines: January 15
Minimum Weeks Required: Six (6) Weeks
Academic credit: Course credit is available depending on school requirements. 
Assignments: ATF's Office of Chief Counsel provides student interns with the opportunity to work closely with attorneys who: provide legal advice to a wide array of ATF and DOJ officials on ATF's policies, programs, and enforcement operations; who review and draft potential legislation impacting ATF's authority and enforcement capabilities; and who handle affirmative, defensive and personnel litigation for ATF. Interns can expect to research discrete legal issues, review and organize documents for litigation, draft memoranda and correspondence, and perform other tasks as required.
 
 
CIVIL DIVISION
P.O. Box 14660, Ben Franklin Station
Washington, D.C. 20044-4660

ATTN: Alexander Kent, Intern Coordinator
Telephone: (202) 307-0261
Fax: (202) 514-7968
Washington DC and General Inquiries | New York Field Office | San Francisco Field Office
(Application via e-mail highly preferred for all offices)
The Civil Division represents the United States, its departments and agencies, Members of Congress, Cabinet officers and other federal employees in a wide range of civil litigation that spans the spectrum of government activities. The Civil Division is the largest litigating component within Justice, employing nearly 1500 employees, and representing over 100 federal agencies in a wide range of complex, high-profile civil litigation. Justice was ranked number seven in the Best Places to Work in the Federal Government for 2009 (www.bestplacestowork.org). The Civil Division was ranked number three out of 216 agency subcomponents. The Division is comprised of six litigating Branches, for more information about each Branch visit: www.usdoj.gov/civil.
Projected No. of Volunteers: 50
Internship Location(s): Washington, D.C., New York City, and San Francisco. The vast majority of internships are located in Washington, D.C.
Application Materials: Cover letter, resume, transcript (official or unofficial), brief writing sample. Indicate the semester you are applying for in the subject line of your e-mail application.
Qualifications: First-year (second semester), second- and third-year law students.
Application Deadlines: Open on a rolling basis.
Minimum Weeks Required: 6 weeks
Academic credit: Work-study credit possible. Transit subsidy is available.
Assignments: Interns research, write, and develop draft motions, briefs, and discovery; attend depositions, moot court and oral arguments; perform legal research; and assist attorneys in all phases of trial preparation and at trial.
 
 
CIVIL DIVISION
FEDERAL PROGRAMS BRANCH

20 Massachusetts Ave NW
Washington DC 20530
ATTN: Please email applications to John Griffiths, Lily Farel, or Tamra Moore at fpb.resumes.interns@usdoj.gov
The Federal Programs Branch specializes in defending federal agencies and officials in complex and high-profile civil litigation.  Trial Attorneys litigate in federal district courts across the country on behalf of more than one hundred federal agencies, the President and Cabinet officers, and other government officials.  Cases often involve challenges to the constitutionality of federal statutes and attacks on significant government policies, programs, and decisions.   The Branch also handles select cases challenging personnel practices and policies and engages in a limited amount of affirmative litigation to enforce federal statutes and regulations.
Projected No. of Volunteers: 2 interns during fall and spring; 8 during summer
Internship Location(s): Washington, D.C.
Application Materials: Cover letter, resume, writing sample, and law school transcript (official or unofficial), if available.
Qualifications: Students must have completed one or two years of law school and must have excellent writing skills and high academic standing.
Application Deadlines: For summer interns, we typically begin reviewing 2L applications in October.  Under NALP guidelines, we can only accept 1L applications starting on December 1.  All applications must be received by January 15.  For fall interns, applications must be received by June 15.  For spring interns, applications must be received by November 15.  Please include in your email subject line the words “Law Student Intern Application” and the period for which you are applying (e.g., “Summer 2014”).
Minimum Weeks Required: For summer interns, 6 weeks.
Academic credit: Academic or work-study credit possible.
Assignments: Interns may receive assignments in any of the Branch’s practice areas.  Interns conduct legal or factual research; prepare internal memoranda, client letters, and briefs; and assist attorneys with discovery and trial preparation.  Interns also are encouraged to attend client meetings, moot courts, oral arguments, depositions, and other litigation events.
 
 
CIVIL DIVISION
CONSUMER PROTECTION BRANCH

450 Fifth Street, NW
Washington DC 20001
ATTN: Jessica Gunder
Telephone: (202) 616-0295
Fax: (202) 514-8742
Email: Consumer.Protection@usdoj.gov (emailed preferred)
The Consumer Protection Branch (CPB) works to protect the health, safety and economic security of the American consumer. The Consumer Protection Branch leads the Justice Department's efforts to enforce consumer protection statutes throughout the United States. Trial Attorneys bring civil actions and criminal prosecutions in federal district courts across the country. These cases are rooted in our nation's fundamental consumer protection laws, establishing crucial precedents and protecting American consumers from threats to their health, safety, and wallet. The Consumer Protection Branch works closely with agencies such as the Food and Drug Administration, the Federal Trade Commission, the Consumer Product Safety Commission, and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Visit the the Consumer Protection Branch page for more information.
Projected No. of Volunteers: 3
Internship Location(s): Washington, D.C.
Application Materials: Please submit a cover letter, resume, law school transcript (official or unofficial), references, and writing sample. Please attach the above material in an e-mail and send it to the attention of Jessica Gunder at Consumer.Protection@usdoj.gov.
Qualifications: Must be a rising 2L by the start date of the internship. Top third of class preferred. Candidates must undergo a background investigation. The positions are unpaid. Candidates must be willing to work at least 20 hours per week.
Application Deadlines: Applications will be reviewed on a rolling basis.
Minimum Weeks Required: 10 weeks
Academic credit: Academic or work-study credit possible.
Assignments: CPB legal interns work on a broad range of challenging substantive matters, including legal research projects, drafting of pleadings and motions, and trial preparation. Interns are given ample opportunity to work closely with attorneys on both criminal and civil matters for CPB's various client agencies.
 
 
CIVIL DIVISION APPELLATE STAFF
950 Penn. Ave. NW, Room 7519
Washington, D.C. 20530

ATTN: Please email applications to Sy Damle, Michael Abate, and Helen Gilbert at civapp.internjobs@usdoj.gov
The Appellate Staff prepares appellate briefs and presents oral arguments in all circuit courts of appeals, representing the United States and its agencies in some of the most high-profile and sensitive litigation in the country. The Staff also prepares recommendations for or against further review in cases the government loses in the district courts or courts of appeals. In addition, the Staff prepares draft certiorari petitions, briefs in opposition to certiorari petitions and Supreme Court merits briefs for the Solicitor General’s office. The Civil Division’s subject matter covers a wide variety of important legal issues, including separation of powers, First Amendment, representation of individuals charged with constitutional violations of a person’s rights (Bivens cases), administrative law, False Claims Act cases, Freedom of Information Act/Privacy Act cases, intellectual property law.
Projected No. of Volunteers: 4-8
Internship Location(s): Washington, D.C.
Application Materials: Resume, writing sample, and law school transcript (official or unofficial), if available. Materials can be sent by e-mail to the address above.
Qualifications: Students who have completed one year of law school (for summer internships), and second- or third-year law students (for all internships). Students must have excellent writing skills and high academic standing.
Application Deadlines: Summer:  1Ls:  Under NALP guidelines, we can only accept 1L applications starting on December 1.  We must receive applications by December 31.
Minimum Weeks Required: 8 weeks (we will try to accommodate split summers)
Academic credit: Academic or work-study credit possible.
Assignments: Interns typically perform research, write memoranda and prepare initial drafts of appellate briefs. The research often entails searching legislative history to aid in statutory interpretation issues, and may also include searching specialized libraries, the National Archives or the Library of Congress. In addition, interns are encouraged to participate in moot courts of staff attorneys and attend oral arguments in the District of Columbia and Federal Circuits.
 
 
CIVIL DIVISION
OFFICE OF IMMIGRATION LITIGATION, APPELLATE SECTION

450 5th Street NW
Washington, DC 20001
ATTN: Terri Leon-Benner
Telephone: (202) 305-7059
Fax: (202) 305-4832
Email: Terri.Leon-Benner@usdoj.gov (Email Preferred)
The Office of Immigration Litigation (OIL) coordinates Federal immigration litigation nationwide, and has both an appellate and a district court section. OIL defends the administrative decisions of the Board of Immigration Appeals, involving removal orders and denials of applications for relief before the Federal Courts of Appeals. OIL Appellate attorneys handle removal cases in the Courts of Appeals, and support the Office of the Solicitor General's immigration litigation efforts in the United States Supreme Court. OIL Appellate provides advice and counsel to United States Attorneys' offices prosecuting criminal immigration issues that overlap with the office's civil litigation. OIL Appellate provides support and counsel to all federal agencies involved in the admission, regulation, and removal of aliens under our immigration and nationality statutes, as well as related areas of border enforcement and national security, and participates in public outreach activities, including training, conferences, and publications. OIL Appellate has approximately 260 attorneys and 100 support staff and handles approximately thirty percent of the Civil Division's caseload.
Projected No. of Volunteers: 16 - 20
Internship Location(s): Washington, D.C.
Application Materials: Send your application materials in a single PDF document in the following order:  cover letter, resume, unofficial transcript, class ranking and 5-10 page writing sample to Terri.Leon-Benner@usdoj.gov.
Qualifications: Must be a rising 2L by the start date of the internships. Maintain a minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.0. Be a United States citizen and is required to have a background investigation. Be able to commit a minimum of 20 hours per week for 10 continuous weeks. Demonstrate interest in immigration or appellate law. Show strong research and writing skills.
Application Deadlines: Spring:  September 27, 2013 (Application Submission Begins August 20, 2013)
Summer 2014:  January 15, 2014 (Application Submission Begins December 9, 2013)
Minimum Weeks Required: 10 weeks (20 hours per week)
Academic credit: Course credit and externship opportunities are available depending on school requirements.
Assignments: Students will be assigned to one of OIL's litigation teams where they will: draft appellate briefs in asylum and cancellation of removal cases and dispositive motions; write case summaries for weekly litigation reports; attend "First Cuts" meetings; and conduct legal research and prepare memoranda.
 
 
CIVIL DIVISION
OFFICE OF FOREIGN LITIGATION
P.O. Box 14360, Ben Franklin Station
Washington, DC 20044
ATTN: Ada E. Bosque
Email: OFLintern@usdoj.gov
The Office of Foreign Litigation (OFL) protects United States interests in litigation pending in foreign courts, whether civil or criminal, affirmative or defensive. Most OFL cases are defensive, and they reflect the wide range of the United States Government's international activities. OFL also conducts affirmative litigation, including litigation aimed at fighting cross-border fraud, such as telemarketing fraud, that targets American citizens. When appropriate, OFL represents the interests of the United States in foreign criminal proceedings. In addition, OFL acts as the Central Authority for incoming requests for international judicial assistance in civil or commercial matters under several treaties. In performing its duties as Central Authority, OFL coordinates the execution of such requests with the cognizant United States Attorney's Office.
Projected No. of Volunteers: 3
Internship Location(s): Washington, D.C.
Application Materials: Cover letter, resume, transcript (official or unofficial), brief writing sample. Indicate the semester you are applying for in the subject line of your e-mail application.
Qualifications: Students must be at least a rising 2L by the start date of the internship, and must have a minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.00. Completion of basic international law course preferred. Foreign language proficiency, though not required, is helpful. Students must have excellent research and writing skills.
Application Deadlines: Open on a rolling basis.
Minimum Weeks Required: 8 weeks (will try to accommodate splits)
Academic credit: Academic or work-study credit possible depending on school requirements.
Assignments: Assignments: Although a student intern's responsibilities will vary depending upon the needs of the office, interns typically review incoming Letters of Request for Judicial Assistance from Foreign courts for treaty compliance, preparing rejection or referral letters, as appropriate. Interns also conduct legal or factual research and prepare memoranda concerning issues arising from Letters of Request or in the context of litigation. The research often entails matters of customary international law.
 
 
CIVIL DIVISION
OFFICE OF VACCINE LITIGATION

P.O. Box 146
Washington, DC 20044
ATTN: Intern and Law Clerk Program Coordinator
Office of Vaccine Litigation
Email: Vaccine.Interns@usdoj.gov
The Vaccine Litigation Group represents the interests of the Secretary of Health and Human Services in all cases filed in the U.S. Court of Federal Claims under the National Childhood Vaccine Injury Act. The cases involve claims of injury as a result of the receipt of certain vaccines. The Vaccine Litigation Group seeks law students for a limited number of fall or winter/spring volunteer (unpaid) law clerk positions.
Projected No. of Volunteers: 6
Internship Location(s): Washington, D.C.
Application Materials: Please submit a cover letter, resume, writing sample (no more than 5 pages), list of three references, and an official or unofficial transcript (all in pdf) to the e-mail address above. Include in your cover letter a brief statement explaining your interest in a volunteer position in our office. We recommend that you attach all your materials to a single e-mail and that you refrain from sending multiple e-mails to avoid confusion.
Qualifications: Applicants should have excellent academic credentials, writing, and interpersonal skills, exhibit good judgment, and have an interest in health care litigation. Experience in medicine is strongly preferred but not required. 1L (second-semester), 2L, 3L, and 4L evening students are eligible for the position. Graduates are ineligible.
Application Deadlines: January 18, 2013.
Minimum Weeks Required: 12 weeks
Academic credit: Course credit and externship opportunities are available depending on school requirements.
Assignments: Law clerks work closely with attorneys and paralegals on substantive matters in all stages of litigation. Indeed, the position offers a unique experience in public service. The legal and medical issues at stake in each case vary greatly. Attorneys and staff in the group handle heavy case loads, and while streamlined procedures are utilized, cases frequently involve complex liability and damages issues. The Group is obliged to ensure that the Vaccine Trust Fund, from which damage awards are paid, is protected and, where eligibility criteria are met, that fair compensation is distributed to those whom Congress has intended. Attorneys appear frequently before the U.S. Court of Federal Claims and before the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit, which affords law clerks the opportunity to gain experience in trial and appellate practice.
 
 
CIVIL DIVISION
TORTS BRANCH
CONSTITUTIONAL TORTS
P.O. Box 7146
Washington DC 20044
ATTN: Please e-mail applications to Evelyn Kennedy at Evelyn.Kennedy@usdoj.gov.
The Department of Justice's Constitutional Torts office represents federal employees at all levels of government in Bivens suits. We are seeking rising 2L or 3L summer interns for 2014 to assist with a variety of matters. Assignments would mainly consist of preparation of briefs and legal memoranda. To the extent possible, interns would also be invited to attend DC-area court proceedings and depositions. Internships are unpaid but offer unparalleled exposure to a unique area of the law.
Projected No. of Volunteers: 2
Internship Location(s): Washington, D.C.
Application Materials: Please submit a resume, transcript, writing sample, and statement of interest via e-mail to the address above.
Qualifications: Rising second-and third-year law students.
Application Deadlines: February 21, 2014
Minimum Weeks Required: 6 weeks
Academic credit: Course credit and externship opportunities are available depending on school requirements.
Assignments: Responsibilities vary depending on case assignments. Interns typically perform research, write memoranda, and prepare initial drafts of motions or briefs. Opportunities may include attending depositions, assisting with trial preparation, and performing other litigation support.
 
 
CIVIL RIGHTS DIVISION
950 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W.
Room 5086, NYA Building
Washington, D.C. 20530
ATTN: Volunteer Internship Coordinator
Fax: (202) 305-9667
E-mail: crt.volunteervacancies@usdoj.gov
The Civil Rights Division is primarily responsible for enforcing federal statutes and executive orders that prohibit, among other things, unlawful discrimination in voting, education, employment, housing, police services, public accommodations and facilities, and federally funded and conducted programs.
Projected No. of Volunteers: 20
Internship Location(s): Washington, D.C.
Application Materials: Submit a resume (which includes your country of citizenship), brief writing sample (no more than 5 pages), a cover letter which indicates the time period you are available to work and the section(s) where you want to be considered.
Qualifications: First-year (second semester), second- and third-year law students.
Application Deadlines: Open until filled; visit http://www.justice.gov/crt/employment/vol_intern_opps.php for specific application deadlines.
Minimum Weeks Required: 8-10weeks
Academic credit: May be used for work-study credit.
Assignments: Interns will assist Division attorneys or specialists in legal and factual research, prepare documents and exhibits, interview witnesses, summarize depositions, analyze records, and other case-related work. Some sections may also involve interns in policy-related assignments. Given the nature of the work and the high quality of its staff, the Division expects interns to be able to grasp issues quickly, complete work thoroughly and accurately, and write clearly and concisely.
Web Site: Visit the volunteer intern opportunities page on the Division’s website http://www.justice.gov/crt/employment/vol_intern_opps.php to learn more about the work of the individual sections in the Division, which ones are recruiting for student volunteer interns, their specific expectations and requirements, and application deadlines.
 
 
CRIMINAL DIVISION
APPELLATE SECTION
950 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W., Room 1264
Washington, DC 20530
Fax: (202) 305-2121
E-mail: App.Interns@usdoj.gov
The Appellate Section prepares draft briefs and certiorari petitions for the Solicitor General for filing in the U.S. Supreme Court; makes recommendations to the Solicitor General as to whether further review is warranted on adverse decisions in the district courts and courts of appeals; and prepares briefs and argues cases in the courts of appeals. The section also prepares and argues motions in significant district court cases. The Section assists U.S. Attorneys and Division prosecutors in preparing briefs for the courts of appeals and provides advice on a variety of legal issues.
Projected No. of Volunteers: 3 – 4
Internship Location(s): Washington, D.C.
Application Materials: To apply for an internship, please submit a cover letter, resume, and writing sample. Please do NOT submit transcripts.
Qualifications: The Appellate Section hires volunteer interns who have completed at least one year of law school.  An offer of a position as a law student intern is contingent on completion of a security clearance.
Application Deadlines: January 15, 2012
Minimum Weeks Required: 8 to 10 weeks
Academic credit:  
Assignments: The Criminal Division Appellate Section’s functions include, among others, the responsibility to research and write memoranda on criminal cases in which an adverse ruling has been made against the United States, in order to make a recommendation to the Solicitor General as to whether she should approve an appeal, rehearing, or certiorari in the case. Student interns in the Section are assigned to prepare these memoranda in a broad range of cases, including cases involving suppression of evidence, dismissals of indictments, post-verdict judgments of acquittal, and adverse sentencing determinations. The legal issues are quite varied, and often involve constitutional questions, questions of statutory interpretation, or the correct application of the Sentencing Guidelines. While students are closely supervised, they are asked to assume primary responsibility for preparing the Division’s memorandum in the cases to which they are assigned. That may include contacting the U.S. Attorney’s Office from which the case originates, making sure the Division receives a timely recommendation from the U.S. Attorney as well as all relevant materials for making a decision in the particular case, and maintaining contact with the U.S. Attorney’s Office throughout the approval process.
 
 
CRIMINAL DIVISION
ASSET FORFEITURE & MONEY LAUNDERING SECTION
1400 New York Avenue, N.W., 2nd & 10th Floor
Washington, D.C. 20530
ATTN: AFMLS Volunteer Internships
Fax: (202) 514-5522
E-mail: AFMLS.HIRING@usdoj.gov
The Asset Forfeiture and Money Laundering Section (AFMLS) leads the Department’s efforts to take the profit out of crime.  The multi-dimensional responsibilities of AFMLS include anti-money laundering enforcement, forfeiture, law development, training, and technical assistance, all done in close cooperation with partners in the United States and abroad.  AFMLS also provides oversight, management, and policy development for the Department’s Assets Forfeiture Fund (AFF).
Projected No. of Volunteers: 4 per semester
Internship Location(s): Washington, D.C.
Application Materials: Please submit via e-mail or fax a cover letter (including dates available), resume, transcript (official or unofficial), a brief writing sample, and 3 references.   
Qualifications: Applicants should have a strong interest in criminal law and have strong writing and communication skills. Applicants must be students who have completed one semester of law school or beyond.
Application Deadlines: Positions are open until filled.
January 15
Minimum Weeks Required: 8 weeks or more, part-time or full-time
Academic credit: Academic or work-study credit possible.
Assignments: Assignments will vary.  Interns will work within the Policy and Training Unit.  Generally, interns work directly with attorneys on issues relating to asset forfeiture and money laundering legal policy.
 
 
CRIMINAL DIVISION
CAPITAL CASE UNIT
1331 F Street, N.W., 3rd Floor
Washington, D.C. 20530
ATTN: Jeffrey.Kahan@usdoj.gov and Jacabed.Rodriguez-Coss@usdoj.gov
Telephone: (203) 696-3027
(202) 305-8910
Fax: (202) 353-9779
The Capital Case Unit (CCU) was created in response to the Department's increased involvement in capital litigation. CCU’s mission is two-fold: First, CCU is responsible for assisting the Attorney General’s Review Committee on Capital Cases in its evaluation of potential death penalty matters. CCU conducts an analysis of all cases in which a United States Attorney charged or could have charged a crime punishable by death. CCU advises the Committee in relation to the factual and legal issues relevant to the Committee’s recommendation to the Attorney General regarding whether to seek the death penalty.  CCU attorneys also provide legal, procedural, and policy guidance to the United States Attorneys’ Offices handling capital investigations and prosecutions. 
Additionally, CCU provides direct litigation support to USAOs handling capital cases. This support takes various forms depending upon the needs in a given case.  CCU employs prosecutors who have previously tried capital cases and are available to serve as co-counsel with AUSAs in their pending capital prosecutions. CCU attorneys may also assist in a more limited fashion. CCU supports all phases of pre-trial litigation, provides guidance in selecting death qualified juries and helps construct penalty phase evidentiary presentations. CCU also provides training and resource materials to federal prosecutors handling capital cases. CCU maintains trial and appellate materials related to federal capital prosecutions which are shared with USAOs across the United States.
Projected No. of Volunteers: 3
Internship Location(s): Washington, D.C.
Application Materials: Applicants should e-mail (preferred) or fax a cover letter, resume, legal writing sample (10 pages or less), and law school transcript.
Qualifications: Applicants for law internship positions must be enrolled in law school and have: (1) a strong academic background; (2) excellent research and writing skills; and (3) a sincere interest in criminal law.
Application Deadlines: March 1 (rolling basis)
Minimum Weeks Required: 10-12 weeks
Academic credit: We work with law schools to fulfill the requirements necessary for credit.
Assignments: Interns work directly with attorneys on issues pertaining to cases in litigation and under review for potential pursuit of the death penalty. The unit is small and the work varies with the demands on the office at any given point in time.
 
 
CRIMINAL DIVISION
CHILD EXPLOITATION AND OBSCENITY SECTION

1400 New York Avenue, N.W., 6th Floor
Washington, D.C. 20530
ATTN: CEOS Legal Internship Coordinator
Fax: (202) 514-1793
E-mail: ceos.interns@usdoj.gov
The Child Exploitation and Obscenity (CEOS) prosecutes those who possess, manufacture, or distribute child pornography; those wso sell, buy, or transport women and children interstate or internationally to engage in sexually explicit conduct; those who travel interstae or internationally to sexually abuse children; those who abuse children on federal and Indian lands; those who do not pay certain court ordered child support payments; those who transport obscene materals in interstate or foreign commerce; and intrnational child abduction. CEOS attorneys assist in 93 United States Attorney's Offices in investigations, trials and appeals related to these offenses.
Projected No. of Volunteers: 4-6
Internship Location(s): Washington, D.C.
Application Materials: Applicants should submit a cover letter, resumr, current law school transcript, and legal writing sample 5-10 pages in length via email to
ceos.interns@usdoj.gov. The cover letter should be addressed to the "CEOS Legal Internship Coordinator." It is best to send all documents in .PDF format. You may also mail your application using FedEx, UPS, DHL or other courier service to: CEOS Legal Intership Coordinator
U.S. Department of Justice
Child Exploitation and Obscenity Section
1400 New York Avenue, 6th Floor
Washington, D.C. 20530 Note: If mailing application, do not use US Mail Applications will be reviewed on a rolling basis before and after the application deadline. Applicants can expect a response on the outcome of their application within approximately four to five weeks after the application deadline.
Qualifications: Second-year and third-year law students are eligible to apply. First-year law students are eligible to apply for the summer internship only. Prior to finalizing an appointment, all interns are required to undergo a security check, which includes a name and fingerprint clearance with the Federal Bureau of Investigation and a determination of suitability for employment based on the information a candidate provides in the security form.
Application Deadlines: January 31
We review applications on a rolling basis.
Minimum Weeks Required: 10 weeks
Academic credit: These positions are volunteer (I.e. uncompensated positions for course credit) and are open until filled
Assignments: Legal interns work directly with the Section's trial attorneys on a variety of assignments, ranging from conducting legal research and writing to assisting in investigations and prosecutions of child exploitation and obscenity offenses.
 
CRIMINAL DIVISION
COMPUTER CRIME & INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY SECTION

1400 New York Avenue, N.W., 6th Floor
Washington, D.C. 20530
ATTN: Scott Eltringham
E-mail: ccips.interns@usdoj.gov
The Computer Crime and Intellectual Property Section (CCIPS) is responsible for resolving unique issues raised by emerging computer and telecommunications technologies and for overseeing the enforcement of federal laws on computer crime, electronic privacy, criminal copyright, trademark and trade secrets. Among its many areas of expertise, the Section provides litigation support to other federal prosecutors, trains federal, state and local law enforcement personnel, drafts, comments upon and proposes legislation, and coordinates international efforts to combat computer crime. The Section also authors publications addressing significant information technology issues. For more information, see the Section Web site www.cybercrime.gov.
Projected No. of Volunteers: 2
Internship Location(s): Washington, D.C.
Application Materials: Please e-mail (preferred) or fax a cover letter, a resume, a short legal writing sample (not to exceed 10 pages), and law school transcript (if available) to: Scott Eltringham
U.S. Department of Justice
E-mail: ccips.interns@usdoj.gov
Fax: (202) 514-6113
Qualifications: Applicants for law internship positions must be in their first or second year of law school and have: (1) a strong academic background; (2) excellent research and writing skills; (3) interest in criminal law; and (4) experience, knowledge, or interest in computers, telecommunications networks or intellectual property. Because of the sensitive nature of the work, applicants must pass this background check before a formal offer for an internship can be extended.
Application Deadlines: January 18
Minimum Weeks Required: 10-12 weeks, full-time
Academic credit: Academic or work study credit possible.
Assignments: Legal interns work directly with attorneys on issues relating to computer and intellectual property crime. Typical intern projects involve researching novel legal issues, drafting litigation documents for active cases, and helping to draft Section publications.
 
CRIMINAL DIVISION
FRAUD SECTION
1400 New York Avenue, N.W., 4th Floor
Washington, D.C. 20530
Fax: (202) 514-7021
E-mail: Minnie.Walker@usdoj.gov
The Fraud Section conducts grand jury investigations and prosecutions in certain cases that require centralized treatment because of the complexity of the scheme, the multi-district nature of the criminal activity, the sensitivity of the issues, or the necessity for developing model prosecutions to establish the viability of a particular statute, theory, or technique. Fraud Section investigations often involves business crimes such as financial institution fraud; securities fraud; Internet fraud; fraud in the insurance industry; international criminal activities in violation of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act; and multi-district schemes that victimize consumers, such as telemarketing and bankruptcy mills. The Section’s prosecutions also focus on fraud involving government programs and procurement, including health care, HUD, and government regulatory activity in the securities and commodities markets.
Projected No. of Volunteers: 20 - 25
Internship Location(s): Washington, D.C.
Application Materials: To apply for an internship, please submit a cover letter, resume, writing sample, references (not to exceed 10 pages), and unofficial transcripts to: Minnie.Walker@usdoj.gov.
Qualifications: The Fraud Section hires volunteer interns who have completed at least one year of law school and have: (1) a strong academic background; (2) excellent research and writing skills; and (3) experience or interest in criminal issues.  Familiarity with power point and excel programs and data collection and organization are helpful. An offer of a position as a law student intern is contingent on completion of a security clearance.
Application Deadlines: January 31
Applications are considered on a rolling basis.
Minimum Weeks Required: 10 – 12 weeks; summer interns are required to spend at least 35 hours a week in the office.  Interns staffed on cases may be asked, but are not required, to commit additional time.
Academic credit: Course credit, as offered through individual institutions.
Assignments: Legal interns work directly with attorneys on cutting edge legal issues relating to a wide range of economic crime issues. Typical intern projects have involved researching novel legal issues, drafting litigation documents for active cases, analyzing policy proposals, creating case summary charts, creating excel spread sheets of relevant information, surveying relevant information from cases around the country, and helping to draft Section publications.
 
CRIMINAL DIVISION
HUMAN RIGHTS AND SPECIAL PROSECUTION SECTION
1301 New York Ave, NW

Washington, D.C. 20530
ATTN: Intern Coordinator
E-mail: HRSPInterns@usdoj.gov
In Summer 2010, the Criminal Division’s Office of Special Investigations and Domestic Security Section were merged into the Human Rights and Special Prosecutions Section (HRSP). The mission of HRSP is to enhance the security of our nation’s citizens and borders by enforcing federal criminal laws relating to: (1) international human rights violations; (2) certain federal crimes of violence committed outside the United States; and (3) complex immigration and border crimes. HRSP is responsible for the investigation and prosecution of select torture, genocide and war crime cases. In addition to the criminal prosecution of these crimes, HRSP detects, investigates, and takes legal action to denaturalize naturalized U.S. citizens who, prior to their naturalization, participated abroad in acts of genocide or in acts of torture or extrajudicial killings committed under color of foreign law. The Section is also responsible for detecting, investigating and taking legal action to denaturalize and/or deport U.S. citizens or residents who participated in Nazi-sponsored acts of persecution between 1933 and 1945. Additionally, HRSP investigates and prosecutes complex immigration cases involving alien smuggling, trafficking in fraudulent travel and identification documents, and international criminal travel networks, particularly those that pose potential national security threats. In addition, HRSP is the Department’s central point of contact regarding Military Extraterritorial Jurisdiction Act (MEJA) investigations and prosecutions which involve felonies committed by overseas military contractors, families of military members and overseas U.S. government employees whose mission supports the Department of Defense. Aside from its operational work, HRSP designs, implements, and supports law enforcement efforts, legislative initiatives, policies and strategies relating to these areas.
Projected No. of Volunteers: 5
Internship Location(s): Washington, D.C.
Application Materials: Please submit via e-mail a cover letter (including dates available), resume, writing sample (not to exceed 10 pages), transcript (official or unofficial), and three references.
Qualifications: Rising second- and third-year law students. Applicants must have: (1) a strong academic background; (2) excellent research and writing skills; and (3) experience or interest in criminal and international law. Applicants must be U.S. citizens. Foreign language proficiency, particularly in Spanish, Arabic, or Chinese, is preferred.   Due to the sensitive nature of the work, applicants must pass a background check before a formal offer for an internship can be extended. 
Application Deadlines: February 1st Applications area reviewed on a rolling basis.
Minimum Weeks Required:
10 weeks or more
No Split Summers will be accepted
Academic credit: Work-study credit possible.
Assignments: Law interns will conduct substantial legal research and writing assignments in the areas of international, criminal, and immigration law. Law interns will also conduct factual research, review and organize documents, and work on policy matters.
 
CRIMINAL DIVISION
NARCOTICS AND DANGEROUS DRUG SECTION

145 N St., NE
2Con, Suite 300
Washington, D.C. 20530
ATTN: Charles Miracle, Intern Coordinator
Fax: (202) 305-9825
E-mail: ndd.interns@usdoj.gov

The Narcotic and Dangerous Drug Section (NDDS) supervises and has responsibility for enforcing federal statutes pertaining to narco-terrorism, narcotic drugs, and other controlled substances. The section advises the Assistant Attorney General, Criminal Division, Department of Justice and other federal officials involved in drug enforcement on all matters related to federal narcotics and narco-terrorism law enforcement including proposed and enacted legislation, policy, enforcement initiatives, and criminal and civil litigation. The section has direct litigation responsibilities in significant drug and narco-terrorism investigations and prosecutions targeting national and international narcotics trafficking and money laundering organizations.

NDDS solicits applications from energetic, organized, and detail-oriented second- and third-year law students to fill intern/extern openings. Unpaid positions are available during academic semesters and summers. Many interns/externs receive academic credit for their experience.

Projected No. of Volunteers: Fall: 4 - 5
Winter/Spring:  4 - 5
Summer 5 - 6
Internship Location(s): Washington, D.C.
Application Materials: Applicants should e-mail and list on the subject line of the e-mail their name, the semester for which the internship is sought (F – Fall, W – Winter/Spring, S – Summer), availability (Full – full-time, Part – part-time), and any language proficiency. E-mail applications should include:

(1) a cover letter, including the weeks and days available to work;
(2) a resume;
(3) a legal writing sample (10 pages maximum); and
(4) transcripts from current degree program.
Qualifications:

Applicants for law internship positions must be enrolled, in good standing, in law school and have: (1) a strong academic background; (2) excellent research and writing skills; (3) interest in criminal and international law; and (4) interest in drug enforcement.

The positions are unpaid. United States citizenship is required. Because of the sensitive nature of the work, applicants must pass a background check before a formal offer for an internship can be extended.

Application Deadlines: Winter/Spring: October 15 (open until filled)
Fall: June 1 (open until filled)
Summer: January 15 (open until filled)
Minimum Weeks Required: Winter/Spring and Fall: Full semester (at least 16 hours per week)
Summer: Full Term (35-40 hours per week)
Academic credit: Work-study credit.
Assignments: Interns work directly with attorneys on issues relating to the investigation and prosecution of significant national and international narcotic traffickers and money laundering organizations. Typical intern projects involve researching novel legal issues, drafting legislation related documents for active cases, and helping attorneys draft Section publications.
 
 
CRIMINAL DIVISION
OFFICE OF ENFORCEMENT OPERATIONS (OEO)

1301 New York Avenue, NW
Washington, D.C. 20530
ATTN: Sandra Holland, Administrative Officer, OEO
E-mail: OEO.applications@usdoj.gov
The Criminal Division of the United States Department of Justice is currently seeking legal interns to work in the Office of Enforcement Operations (OEO) during the summer of 2014. OEO provides investigative and prosecutorial support, legal advice, and review and approval required by statute or policy in almost 40 distinct subject areas. OEO oversees the use of the most sophisticated investigative tools at the federal government's disposal, including electronic surveillance, the Federal Witness Security Program, subpoenas to members of the news media in federal cases, subpoenas to attorneys, applications to search the premises of attorneys, and requests to immunize witnesses. OEO provides legal advice to federal l prosecutors and agencies on the above-mentioned programs and investigative techniques, and assists in developing Department policy on emerging technologies and telecommunications issues. OEO also responds to requests made to the Criminal Division for disclosure of information under the Freedom of Information Act and Privacy Act, and serves in a coordinating role for the Criminal Division with regard to victim and witness assistance. In addition, OEO supervises the International Prisoner Transfer Program. Legal interns will assist OEO attorneys on a variety of matters within OEO's portfolio.
Projected No. of Volunteers: 5
Internship Location(s): Washington, D.C.
Application Materials: Interested applicants are encouraged to submit in a single .pdf document, a cover letter, resume, writing sample, references and a law school transcript (official or unofficial will be accepted). These documents can be sent by email as detailed below.
Commitment Required: The internships will last approximately 10 weeks and are expected to begin on May 27, 2014.
Application Deadlines: February 15, 2014. Applications will be considered on a rolling basis.
Academic credit: We will work with law schools to fulfill the requirements necessary for credit.
Assignments: Interns will be responsible for research projects in a number of diverse topics related to OEO's many areas of responsibility, working under the supervision of OEO attorneys. In addition, interns assigned to the International Prisoner Transfer Unit (IPTU) of OEO will evaluate actual cases, under the supervision of IPTU attorneys, and will prepare memoranda for the Director of the Office of Enforcement Operations, recommending approval or denial of the prisoner's application to transfer to or from incarceration in the United States. Interns will work under the supervision of OEO attorneys in completing their research/writing assignments and, in the case of interns assigned to the IPTU, will have contact with the prosecuting Assistant United States Attorney and the various law enforcement agencies involved in the cases, as well as with Federal Bureau of Prisons personnel in evaluating prisoner transfer requests.
 
 
CRIMINAL DIVISION
OFFICE OF INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS

Washington, D.C. 20530
E-mail: OIAIntern@usdoj.gov
The Office of International Affairs (OIA) solicits applications from energetic, organized, and detail-oriented first-year (second semester), second- and third-year law students (L), undergraduate students (UG), and graduate students (G) to fill intern/extern openings. Unpaid positions are available during academic semesters and summers. Many interns/externs receive academic credit for their experience. OIA works with criminal prosecutors in the United States to secure the return of fugitives from abroad and to obtain from foreign countries evidence and other assistance (e.g. freezing of accounts and forfeiture of funds) needed in criminal investigations and prosecutions. OIA assists federal, state and local prosecutors and law enforcement agents pursuant to a network of bilateral and multilateral treaties and law enforcement agreements.

In turn, OIA assures that the United States meets its reciprocal obligations to foreign countries by responding to their requests for the extradition of fugitives and the production of evidence located in the United States. In addition to handling the thousands of international extradition and evidence gathering (mutual assistance) cases opened each year, OIA, with the Department of State, is responsible for the negotiation of law enforcement treaties, both bilateral and multilateral, needed to effect extradition and facilitate evidence gathering. When treaties come into force, OIA is responsible for working with treaty partners on an ongoing basis to assure the effective implementation of these important agreements.
Internship Location(s): Student interns are utilized by OIA’s geographic and subject matter teams as follows:
Team 1:  United Kingdom, Australia, Canada, New Zealand, English-speaking Caribbean, Haiti (UG, G).
Team 2:  Europe, French-speaking Caribbean (except Haiti) (UG, G, L).
Team 3: Mexico, Central America and Spanish-speaking Caribbean (UG, G, L)
Team 4:  Asia, Middle East, Africa, Pacific Islands (UG, G, L).
Team 5:  Canada (UG, G).
Team 6:  South America (UG, G, L).
Policy and Multilateral Group (PMG) (none sought). Litigation and Legal Policy Group (LLP) (L only). 
Who May Apply? Junior and Senior undergraduate students, graduate students and first- year (second semester) only, second- and third-year law students are encouraged to apply.  Undergraduate and graduate students with a strong writing background and an interest in international matters and criminal law may be particularly interested in these positions.  Knowledge of a foreign language is desirable but not essential.  United States citizenship is required.  A background check and a drug test are part of the application process.    
What About An Application? Please apply by email and list on the subject line of the email the semester for which the internship is sought (W--Winter/Spring, S-Summer, F-Fall); student status (UG-undergraduate, G-graduate, L-law); Team Preference (per above), and any language(s) spoken. Please include the following: (1) resume (should reflect GPA and/or class rank);
(2) short writing sample, 5 pp or less;
(3) transcript(s); and,
(4) at least two references who are familiar with the applicant’s research, writing and organizational skills.
Where Should I Submit My Application? Applications should be e-mailed to OIAIntern@usdoj.gov, with the subject line filled out per above (e.g. S; UG; Tm 3; Spanish).
Application Deadlines:
Summer  February 15  (open until filled)
Applications are considered on a rolling basis.

Office Location: U.S. Department of Justice
Criminal Division
Office of International Affairs
1301 New York Avenue, NW, Ninth Floor
Washington, D.C. 20530
 
 
CRIMINAL DIVISION
OFFICE OF OVERSEAS PROSECUTORIAL DEVELOPMENT, ASSISTANCE AND TRAINING (OPDAT)

10th & Pennsylvania Ave., N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20530
ATTN: Intern Coordinator
Telephone: (202) 514-1323
Fax: (202) 616-6770
E-mail: OPDATapplications@usdoj.gov
OPDAT develops and implements criminal justice assistance programs that enhance the ability of selected foreign countries to investigate, prosecute and adjudicate criminal offenses effectively, competently and fairly, and to cooperate more fully with the United States in combating transnational crime.
Projected No. of Volunteers: 4
Internship Location(s): Washington, D.C.
Application Materials: (1)Resume, (2)  academic standing, (3) dates when available, (4)  targeted cover letter articulating the value  the candidate can add to the organization. 
Qualifications: First-year (second semester), second- and third-year law students; full-time International or Comparative Law LL.M. candidates who are not employed while pursuing their advanced degree.
Application Deadlines: November 15
Minimum Weeks Required: 10 weeks
Academic credit: Supports academic credit requirements.
Assignments: Interns will work closely with attorneys and professional staff to support advisors in areas in where foreign justice sector institutions are in need of strengthening; assist short-term experts to prepare for overseas criminal justice assistance missions; and research and compile data for measuring effectiveness and for results-based programmatic reporting.  Law students who are interested in comparative criminal law and procedure and who wish to help create more responsive and responsible criminal justice systems worldwide are encouraged to apply.  The ideal candidate thrives in a collaborative work environment, possesses strong research and writing skills, and has experienced foreign cultures.  Language skills, particularly Spanish, French, Russian, Arabic, or Chinese are desirable, but not required. 
 
 
CRIMINAL DIVISION
ORGANIZED CRIME AND GANG SECTION

1301 New York Avenue, NW
Washington, D.C. 20005
ATTN: Catherine Weinstock
Julie Wuslich
E-mail: OCGSInterns@usdoj.gov
The Criminal Division’s Organized crime and Gang Section (OCGS) is a specialized group of prosecutors charged with developing and implementing strategies to disrupt and dismantle the most significant regional, national and international gangs and organized crime groups.
Projected No. of Volunteers: 4 – 6
Internship Location(s): Washington, D.C.
Application Materials: Please submit the following: cover letter, resume, law school transcript (official or unofficial) and legal writing sample.  All materials should be in PDF format.  E-mail application materials at OCGSInterns@usdoj.gov.
Qualifications: First-year (second semester) applying for summer should submit all materials except for a law school transcript.  Applications from 1Ls should not be submitted before, and will not be considered until December 1.  2Ls, 3Ls and LLM. Excellent research and writing skills are required. Classes in criminal procedure, criminal law, and evidence recommended.

Prior to finalizing an appointment, all interns are required to undergo a security check, which includes a name and fingerprint clearance with the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and a determination of suitability for employment based on the information a candidate provides in the security form.
Application Deadlines: Summer: apply September - January
Applications are considered on a rolling basis, so kindly submit your materials as soon as possible.
Minimum Weeks Required: 10 weeks, 40 hours per week
Academic credit: Work-study credit
Assignments: Position entails extensive research and writing on a variety of issues pertaining to federal criminal procedure and law, evidence, labor law, RICO, sentencing, legislative, and policy matters.
Web Site: www.justice.gov/criminal/ocgs/about/
www.justice.gov/criminal/ocgs/about/portfolio.html
www.justice.gov/criminal/about/orgchart.html
 
 

Email application materials at PIN.intern.lawclerk@usdoj.gov

CRIMINAL DIVISION
PUBLIC INTEGRITY SECTION
1400 New York Avenue, NW, 12th Floor
Washington, D.C. 20530
ATTN: PIN Intern Coordinator
E-mail: PIN.interns@usdoj.gov
The Public Integrity Section (PIN) oversees the federal effort to combat corruption through the prosecution of elected and appointed public officials at all levels of government. PIN has exclusive jurisdiction over allegations of criminal misconduct on the part of federal judges and also monitors the investigation and prosecution of election and conflict of interest crimes. PIN attorneys prosecute selected cases against federal, state, and local officials, and are available as a source of advice and expertise to other prosecutors and investigators.
Projected No. of Volunteers: 6 - 8
Internship Location(s): Washington, D.C.
Application Materials:

To apply, please submit, in a single .pdf document:

  • cover letter;
  • resume;
  • law school transcript (official or unofficial);
  • legal writing sample (not to exceed 10 pages); and
  • three references.

Email application materials at PIN.interns@usdoj.gov

Qualifications: All applicants must be currently enrolled in law school and have a strong academic background, excellent research and writing skills, mature judgment, and a commitment to public service work. Any offer is contingent upon a completion of a security clearance.
Application Deadlines: January 15
Applications are considered on a rolling basis; early applications helpful.
Minimum Weeks Required: 10-12 weeks (40 hours a week).
Interns on cases may be asked, but are not required, to commit additional time.
Academic credit: Course credit possible as offered by applicant's law school.
Assignments: Legal interns work closely with PIN trial attorneys on a range of investigative and litigation issues related to the Section’s efforts to combat public corruption. Projects deal with the procedural and substantive aspects of criminal law and include researching and briefing complex legal questions, drafting motions, responses, and other litigation documents for active cases, and updating the Section’s internal research resources. Legal interns typically work on a variety of projects during their internships, so as to better understand the breadth of the Section’s cases, and are offered opportunities to observe witness interviews, hearings and other proceedings, and to produce significant written work product.
 
 
DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION
OFFICE OF CHIEF COUNSEL

Washington, D.C. 20537
ATTN: Carol Wilkinson, Executive Assistant to the Deputy Chief Counsel
Telephone: (202) 307-5575
Fax: (202) 307-3603
E-mail: DEALawClerk@usdoj.gov (Applications by e-mail preferred)
The Drug Enforcement Administration’s (DEA) Office of Chief Counsel provides legal services and guidance to all components of DEA for all matters that may arise in the conduct of DEA missions to enforce the controlled substances laws and regulations of the United States while serving and protecting the public.  The office assists DEA in its decision making capacity by analyzing the legal implications in policy decisions, advising and training DEA personnel worldwide on criminal, civil, international, intelligence, and regulatory issues, reviewing proposed legislation and regulations, and representing DEA in civil and administrative litigation.
Projected No. of Volunteers: 6
Internship Location(s): 600 Army-Navy Drive
Arlington, Virginia 22202
(Pentagon City)
Application Materials: Cover letter (including dates when available), resume, transcript (official or unofficial), writing sample, and DEA Drug Questionnaire (see NOTE below). NOTE:  Applicants who are found, through investigation or personal admission, to have experimented with or used narcotics or dangerous drugs, except those medically prescribed, will not be considered for employment with DEA.  Exceptions to this policy may be made for applicants who admit to limited youthful and experimental use of marijuana.  Such applicants may be considered for employment if there is no evidence of regular, confirmed usage and the results of the other steps in the process are otherwise favorable. Compliance with this policy is an essential requirement of the position. All applicants must complete the DEA Drug Questionnaire and submit that Questionnaire with their application package.
Qualifications: First-year (second semester) and second-year law students.
Application Deadlines: January 1, 2014
Minimum Weeks Required: 8 weeks
Academic credit: Work study credit if available through law school.
Assignments: DEA’s Office of Chief Counsel offers its interns the opportunity to work closely with attorneys in all of the office's practice areas, to include: Diversion and Regulatory Policy and Litigation; Civil Litigation; Administrative Law; Legislative Affairs; Legal Training; International Law; Domestic Criminal Law; Asset Forfeiture; and Technology Law.  Interns can expect to conduct research, draft memoranda and correspondence, interact with agency officials, and perform other tasks as required.
 
 
ENVIRONMENT AND NATURAL RESOURCES DIVISION
P.O. Box 7611
Ben Franklin Station
Washington, D.C. 20044-7611
ATTN: Betsy Preston (Washington, DC prgram)
Lisa Daniels (Field Office program)
E-mail: (Application via e-mail is highly preferred
Applications will be acknowledged by e-mail upon receipt.
applyintern.enrd@usdoj.gov (Washington, DC program)
ApplyInternFieldOffice@ENRD.gov (Field Office program)

Questions about the intern programs may be sent to Ms. Preston or Ms. Daniels at: correspondence.enrd@usdoj.gov
The Environment and Natural Resources Division litigates in five key areas: pollution, lands and natural resources, wildlife, Indian resources, and land acquisition. Attorneys represent many federal government agencies by preparing and arguing civil and criminal enforcement cases, appeals, and by defending challenged federal government agency actions arising from well over 100 federal environmental laws. Cases are at the cutting edge of environmental protection. The Division's work protects our environment for future generations.
Projected No. of Volunteers: Up to 50 per semester - Available positions vary according to semester and location.
Internship Location(s): Washington, D.C.; Sacramento, CA; Denver, CO; Boston, MA; Seattle WA (openings vary at each site)
Assignments: Assignments will vary. In general, interns assist the Division’s trial lawyers in preparing cases for filing and supporting the litigation effort post-filing, and assist the Division’s appellate lawyers in researching issues on appeal. Responsibilities typically include conducting legal research, drafting motions, discovery, and memoranda of law dealing with a variety of federal environmental and natural resource issues. The Division handles cases covering a broad spectrum of issues including the protection of endangered species and civil and criminal enforcement of federal pollution control laws. An internship provides an outstanding opportunity to work on cutting edge issues of environmental law.
Minimum Weeks Required: Summer – 8 weeks (full summer strongly preferred). School year – complete semester or quarter.
Qualifications: First-year (second-semester), second-year and third-year law students are eligible to apply. Joint degree and LL M students are also eligible to apply, provided they meet the eligibility requirements set forth below. First-year, first-semester law students may apply after December 1st for internships the following summer. The Department follows the National Association of Law Placement guidelines that prohibit employer contact with first-year (first-semester) students regarding summer employment prior to that date. Law students may work in volunteer positions only while attending law school. Law school graduation terminates eligibility, except for graduate law students enrolled at least half time and who are not practicing law. Prefer students with strong academic qualifications, research and writing skills and who have an interest in litigation, environmental law, and/or public interest law. Applicants must be U.S. Citizens and successfully complete a security clearance prior to appointment.
Academic credit: Work-study credit possible.
To apply: Washington, DC: Beginning in 2014, ENRD has streamlined its application process for Washington, DC internship applications. Washington, DC internship positions now are advertised through the Symplicity job posting service (available in most law school placement offices) or this website. Fall 2014: ENRD is accepting applications for its Fall 2014 Washington, DC internships from January 30, 2014 until March 23, 2014.  To apply for a Fall 2014 internship in Washington, DC submit by email to applyintern.enrd@usdoj.gov the following materials:
  • Section Application Form
  • Cover letter stating hours/days available to work;
  • Resume (which includes your country of citizenship);
  • Writing sample;
  • Copy of your most recent transcript (official or unofficial); and
  • Three references with contact information, including telephone and email (letters of recommendation not required).
Spring and Summer 2015: ENRD will begin accepting applications for its Spring and Summer 2015 Washington, DC internships in August. This website will be updated and an announcement will be listed through the career services offices on the Symplicity system at that time. Questions about this program may be directed to correspondence.enrd@usdoj.gov. All Field Office locations: (Denver, CO; Sacramento, CA; Boston, MA; Seattle, WA)

To apply to an ENRD Field Office, submit by email or U.S. postal mail the following materials (email and mailing address follow):
  • Resume (which includes your country of citizenship);
  • Cover letter stating location preference(s) and hours/days available to work;
  • Writing sample;
  • Copy of your most recent transcript (official or unofficial); and
  • Three references with contact information, including telephone and email (letters of recommendation not required).
Submit field office internship application materials to:
E-mail: ApplyInternFieldOffice.ENRD@usdoj.gov (Application via e-mail highly preferred)

OR, mail application to:
P.O. Box 7611
Ben Franklin Station
Washington, D.C. 20044
ATTN: Lisa Daniels Applications will be acknowledged by e-mail upon receipt.
Application Deadlines: Washington DC program
Fall 2014:  March 23, 2015 Annual Application Deadlines for Field Office Positions:
Decisions regarding field office internships are made on a rolling basis
April 1 for Fall (September-December)
September 1 for Spring (January-April)
January 1 for Summer (May-August)
 
 
ENVIRONMENT AND NATURAL RESOURCES DIVISION
ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT SECTION
P.O. Box 7611
Ben Franklin Station
Washington, D.C. 20044-7754
ATTN: Joseph Hurley, Senior Attorney
Fax: (202) 514-0097
E-mail: Joseph.Hurley@USDOJ.GOV
The Environmental Enforcement Section (EES) has responsibility for representing the United States in federal civil enforcement of all major environmental statutes, including CERCLA, RCRA, Clean Water Act and Clean Air Act. While the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is EES' primary client agency, EES also handles cases on behalf of DOI, USDA, and NOAA, as trustees of the national natural resources.
Projected No. of Volunteers: Fall/Spring 8 - 13
Internship Location(s): Washington, D.C.
Application Materials: Beginning in 2014, ENRD has streamlined its application process for Washington, DC internship applications. Washington, DC internship positions now are advertised through the Symplicity job posting service (available in most law school placement offices) or this website.

Fall 2014: Fall 2014 applications for Washington, DC internships will be accepted until March 23, 2014.
To apply for a Fall 2014 internship in Washington, DC, submit by email to applyintern.enrd@usdoj.gov the following materials:
  • Section Application Form
  • Cover letter stating hours/days available to work;
  • Resume (which includes your country of citizenship);
  • Writing sample;
  • Copy of your most recent transcript (official or unofficial); and
  • Three references with contact information, including telephone and email (letters of recommendation not required).
Spring and Summer 2015: ENRD will begin accepting applications for its Spring and Summer 2015 Washington, DC internships in August. This website will be updated and an announcement will be listed through the career services offices on the Symplicity system at that time.
Qualifications: Second- and third-year law students; excellent academic record and writing skills; background, experience or interest in environmental law, litigation or in public interest law.
Application Deadlines: Application deadlines follow the ENRD Washington, DC program dates (see announcement immediately above).
Minimum Weeks Required: School year - complete Fall or Spring semester, or if school is on a quarter system, for the complete quarter.
Academic credit: Many students receive credit from their schools during the school year.
Assignments:
Interns typically draft legal memoranda, motions, briefs and written discovery in actual federal cases; participate in conference calls and strategy planning sessions with DOJ, agency counsel and technical experts; and, when possible, attend depositions, negotiations or court hearings in Washington, D.C.
 
 
EXECUTIVE OFFICE FOR IMMIGRATION REVIEW
The Executive Office for Immigration Review (EOIR) is responsible for adjudicating immigration-related cases. Specifically, under delegated authority from the Attorney General, EOIR interprets and administers federal immigration laws by conducting immigration court proceedings, appellate reviews, and administrative hearings. EOIR has three components: the Office of the Chief Immigration Judge, which is responsible for managing the numerous immigration courts located throughout the United States where immigration judges adjudicate individual cases; the Board of Immigration Appeals, which primarily conducts appellate reviews of immigration judge decisions; and the Office of the Chief Administrative Hearing Officer, which adjudicates immigration-related employment cases. EOIR is committed to providing fair, expeditious, and uniform application of the nation's immigration laws in all cases.
Projected No. of Volunteers: Office of the Chief Immigration Judge:  1 – 6 at each court.  Please contact the local Judicial Law Clerk for more information. Office of the Chief Administrative Hearing Officer:  1
Internship Location(s): Office of the Chief Immigration Judge There are over 50 Immigration Courts nationwide with internship opportunities available.  Please see http://www.justice.gov/eoir/sibpages/ICadr.htm for a list of locations. Please visit www.usdoj.gov/eoir and click on “Immigration Courts Nationwide” to obtain court addresses.
Application Materials: Cover letter, resume, writing sample, and official or unofficial transcript. Office of the Chief Immigration Judge – Please send application materials to the attention of the local Judicial Law Clerk or contact Nina Elliot at nina.elliot@usdoj.gov Office of the Chief Administrative Hearing Officer – contact Kimberly R. Wilkins at Kimberly.Wilkins@usdoj.gov
Qualifications: First-year (second semester) law students, second- and third-year law students.  Background checks are required and students must be a U.S. citizen.
Application Deadlines: Office of the Chief Immigration Judge - Varies by Immigration Court.  Please contact the local Judicial Law Clerk for more information. Office of the Chief Administrative Hearing Officer Applications accepted on a rolling basis.
Minimum Weeks Required: Office of the Chief Immigration Judge – Varies by Immigration Court Office of the Chief Administrative Hearing officer --  10 weeks
Academic credit: Course credit, as offered through individual institutions.
Assignments: Interns are exposed to litigation with frequent opportunities to observe case proceedings. Typical assignments include drafting official court orders; researching complex, novel issues in immigration law or immigration-related employment cases; and preparing materials to assist the Immigration Judge or OCAHO’s administrative law judge.
 
 
EXECUTIVE OFFICE FOR U.S. ATTORNEYS
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE
600 E Street, NW, Room 6800
Washington, DC 20530-0001
ATTN: Romona Greene
Human Resources Special Program Manager
Telephone: (202) 252-5528
Fax: (202) 252-5528
E-mail: USAEO.EOUSAJobs@usdoj.gov (Please Reference "Internship" in Subject Line)
The mission of the Executive Office for United States Attorneys (EOUSA) is to provide the 93 United States Attorneys (94 United States Attorneys’ Offices) with:  general executive assistance and direction, policy development, administrative management direction and oversight, operational support, and coordination with other components of the Department and other federal agencies. These responsibilities include certain legal, budgetary, administrative, and personnel services, as well as legal education.
Projected No. of Volunteers: 10
Internship Location(s): Washington, D.C.
Application Materials: Resume, transcript (official or unofficial), writing sample (no more than 5 pages) and dates when available.
Qualifications: First-year (second semester) and second-year law students; law students with paralegal and computer experience. Students interested in administrative law; federal employment law, or litigation are encouraged to apply. Must be a U.S. citizen.
Application Deadline: Applications are accepted year-round but preferred deadlines are:
February 1 for Summer Program (June - August)
Minimum Weeks Required: 6 - 8 weeks
Academic credit: Volunterr (without compensation) or work-study credit
Assignments: Interns interested in administrative law, federal employment law, or litigation will be involved in projects that involve ethics, standards of conduct, employment law, questions arising from United States Attorney's Offices and law research projects. Each legal intern will work with an attorney who will provide specific guidance and direction.
Web Site www.usdoj.gov/usao/eousa
 
 
FEDERAL BUREAU OF PRISONS
320 First Street, N.W., Room 948
Washington, D.C. 20534
ATTN: B. Kevin Cardwell
Associate General Counsel, Legal Administrative Branch
Telephone: (202) 514-6105
Fax: (202) 514-6225
E-mail: B. Kevin Cardwell@bop.gov (Applications by e-mail preferred)
The Federal Bureau of Prisons oversees the operation of the federal prison system.  Attorneys are exposed to a myriad of issues, from constitutional law to government contracts to litigation.
Projected No. of Volunteers: 4
Internship Location(s): Washington, D.C.
Application Materials: Cover letter, resume, transcript (official or unofficial), and writing sample of no more than five pages.
Qualifications: First-year (second semester) and second-year law students.
Application Deadline: February 13, 2013  (June - August)
(open until filled)
Minimum Weeks Required: 8 to 10 weeks
Academic credit: Academic and work study credit are possible
Assignments: Interns will work in one or more of the legal branches in the Office of General Counsel, Commercial Law, Real Estate and Environmental Law, Litigation, Employment Law and Ethics, Legislative and Correctional Issues, and the Legal Administrative Branch (FOIA).  Interns will also have opportunities to handle projects from branches outside of their own in order to broaden their legal experience and knowledge.  Interns will conduct extensive legal research on novel issues and draft legal memoranda, opinions and correspondence.  Interns will have the opportunity to visit a federal correctional institution, take tours of various law enforcement branches of the federal government, and also attend several brown bag lunches with Bureau of Prisons staff.
 
 
NATIONAL SECURITY DIVISION
COUNTERTERRORISM SECTION
950 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20530
ATTN: Intern Program Coordinator (Counterterrorism Section)
E-mail: cts-internship@usdoj.gov
The National Security Division’s (NSD) Counterterrorism Section (CTS), United States Department of Justice (DOJ), seeks qualified volunteer interns for summer opportunities.  Summer intern positions are full time from June through mid-August.  Interns cannot participate in another internship while working with CTS. 

The mission of CTS is to prevent and disrupt acts of terrorism in the United States and around the world.  We investigate and prosecute domestic and international terrorism cases, support the counterterrorism efforts of other federal departments and agencies, and work with foreign governments to assist in their criminal investigations and prosecutions of terrorists. 
Projected No. of Volunteers: 8
Internship Location(s): Washington, D.C.
Application Materials: If interested in applying, please send a cover letter, resume, a legal writing sample (not to exceed ten pages) an unofficial transcript (if available), and the contact information of three references via email to cts-internship@usdoj.gov.  Paper or faxed applications will not be considered.
Qualifications: Applicants must be U.S. citizens and able to obtain and maintain a security clearance.  Applicants must be enrolled in an accredited U.S. law school at the time of application and throughout their internship.  Strong analytic, research and writing skills are required.  Prior interest or experience in national security or criminal litigation is highly preferred.  Courses such as Criminal Procedure, Evidence and Trial Practice are also helpful.  Interns cannot participate in another internship while interning with CTS. 
Application Deadline: December 15, 2013
Academic credit: Internships are unpaid.  If your school offers interns academic or work study, we will work with you to meet school requirements whenever possible. 
Assignments: CTS intern responsibilities include:  conducting legal research and analysis, assisting with the drafting of motions and other pleadings, and assisting with presentations and supporting materials. 
 
 
NATIONAL SECURITY DIVISION
FOREIGN  INVESTMENT REVIEW STAFF
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE
600 E Street, NW, 10th Floor
Washington, D.C. 20004
ATTN: Intern Program Coordinator (Foreign Investment Review Staff)
The National Security Division’s (NSD) Foreign Investment Review Staff, United States Department of Justice (DOJ), seeks summer interns for positions located in Washington, D.C.

The National Security Division’s Foreign Investment Review Staff (FIRS) serves as DOJ’s representative on the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States (CFIUS) – a multi-agency body which reviews acquisitions of U.S. companies by foreign entities in order to determine the effects of the acquisition on national security – and Team Telecom – an informal interagency group which provides opinions to the FCC as to whether granting particular licenses to foreign owned or controlled entities will pose national security risks.  FIRS attorneys review foreign acquisitions and provide recommendations regarding these acquisitions to the Assistant Attorney General and her staff.  Recommendations can include the negotiation and drafting of national security agreements for transactions which can only be cleared with temporary or permanent monitoring by CFIUS agencies and, in rare circumstances, the drafting of recommendations to the President of the United States.  Team Telecom reviews FCC license applications to determine if a proposed communication provider is under foreign ownership, control, and/or influence and can pose a risk to national security that is sufficient to merit the imposition of mitigating measures or opposition to the transaction.  FIRS attorneys also supervise compliance of national security agreements between the Department of Justice and foreign-owned U.S. businesses.  In addition to working with a variety of Justice Department components, FIRS works closely with the Intelligence Community and the Departments of Homeland Security, Treasury, and Defense. 

In the above-described capacities, FIRS supports the mission of the National Security Division, which is to coordinate the Department’s efforts in carrying out its top priority of preventing and combating terrorism and protecting the national security.  The NSD provides legal and policy advice on national security matters, litigates counterterrorism, counterespionage and foreign intelligence surveillance matters, represents the Government before the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court and other federal trial and appellate courts, and conducts oversight over Federal Bureau of Investigation national security investigations and foreign intelligence collection. 
Projected No. of Volunteers: 2
Internship Location(s): Washington, D.C.
Application Materials: Cover letter, resume with two references, transcript (official or unofficial), and a writing sample (not to exceed ten pages). Please submit these materials via email to Marilyn.shaifer@usdoj.gov.  Paper or faxed applications will not be considered.
Qualifications: Applicants must be able to obtain and maintain a security clearance. Applicants must be enrolled in an accredited U.S. law school at the time of application and throughout their internship. Strong research and writing skills, good interpersonal skills and the ability to work in a supportive and professional team environment with client agencies, support staff and other attorneys are required. Prior interest or experience in the area of cybersecurity, telecommunications regulation, and/or corporate transactions is desirable.  Courses addressing national security or intelligence law would also be helpful but not required. 
Application Deadline: February 22, 2013
Minimum Weeks Required: June – August
Academic credit: Internships are unpaid.  If your school offers interns academic or work study, we will work with you to meet school requirements whenever possible.
Assignments: Intern projects include: researching legal questions, drafting memoranda or other legal and policy analysis, factual research, and assisting with presentations and supporting materials.
 
NATIONAL SECURITY DIVISION, OFFICE OF LAW AND POLICY
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE
950 Pennsylvania Ave, NW
Washington, DC, 20530
ATTN: Intern Program Coordinator (Office of Law and Policy)
The National Security Division's (NSD) Office of Law and Policy, United States Department of
Justice, seeks summer interns for positions located in Washington, D.C. The mission of the
National Security Division is to coordinate the Department's efforts in carrying out its top
priority of preventing and combating terrorism and protecting the national security. The NSD
provides legal and policy advice on national security matters, litigates counterterrorism,
counterespionage and foreign intelligence surveillance matters, represents the Government
before the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court and other federal trial and appellate courts,
and conducts oversight over Federal Bureau of Investigation national security investigations and
foreign intelligence collection. The Office of Law and Policy is responsible for, among other things, resolving novel and complex legal issues relating to national security that arise from the work of the Division and other parts of the Department, including the Federal Bureau of Investigation; providing advice and guidance to Department leadership, the Intelligence Community, and other Executive Branch agencies on matters of national security law and policy; overseeing the development of legislation, guidelines, and other policies in the area of national security; working with foreign governments on a variety of national security issues; and handling appeals that arise in national security cases. The Office works with a variety of other Department components, including the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the Office of Legal Counsel, and the Office of Legal Policy, as well as other departments and agencies, such as the National Security Agency, the Central Intelligence Agency, the Department of Defense, and the Department of State.
Projected No. of Volunteers: 2-3
Internship Location(s): Washington, D.C.
Application Materials: Cover letter, resume with two references, transcript (official or unofficial), and a writing sample (not to exceed ten pages). Please submit these materials AS ONE PDF via email to office.of.law.and.policy-internship@usdoj.gov. Paper or faxed applications will not be considered.
Qualifications: Applicants must be able to obtain and maintain a security clearance. Applicants
must be enrolled in an accredited U.S. law school at the time of application and throughout their internship. Strong research and writing skills are required. Prior interest or experience in the area of national security would be useful, but is not required. By the time of the internship, all applicants must have taken one or more of the following courses: Criminal Law, Criminal Procedure, or Constitutional Law. Additional courses addressing criminal law and litigation or national security or intelligence law, would also be helpful.
Application Deadline: December 15, 2012

Please send all applications to the email address office.of.law.and.policy-internship@usdoj.gov by COB on December 15, 2012 to be accepted, approved, and on-time for the internship.
Minimum Weeks Required: Summer Internship: June - Mid-August (minimum ten weeks)
Salary: Internships are unpaid. If your school offers interns academic or work study, we will work with you to meet school requirements whenever possible.
Assignments: Intern projects include: researching legal questions, drafting memoranda or other legal and policy analysis, factual research, and assisting with presentations and supporting materials.
Website: http://www.justice.gov/nsd/
 
NATIONAL SECURITY DIVISION
OFFICE OF JUSTICE FOR VICTIMS OF OVERSEAS TERRORISM

950 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20530
ATTN: Intern Program Coordinator (Office of Justice for Victims of Overseas Terrorism)
E-mail: nsd.ovt@usdoj.gov
The National Security Division’s (NSD) Office of Justice for Victims of Overseas Terrorism (OVT), United States Department of Justice (DOJ), seeks summer interns for positions located in Washington, D.C.

The mission of the National Security Division is to coordinate the Department’s efforts in carrying out its top priority of preventing and combating terrorism and protecting national security. The NSD provides legal and policy advice on national security matters, litigates counterterrorism, counterespionage and foreign intelligence surveillance matters, represents the Government before the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court and other federal trial and appellate courts, and conducts oversight over Federal Bureau of Investigation national security investigations and foreign intelligence collection.

The Office of Justice for Victims of Overseas Terrorism is responsible for, among other things, ensuring that the investigation and prosecution of terrorist attacks against American citizens overseas remain a high priority within DOJ; acting as a DOJ liaison to U.S. victims of overseas terrorism; providing advice and guidance to Division components and leadership on novel and complex legal issues relating to terrorism victims that arise from the work of the Division; assisting in the development of legislation, guidelines, and other policies to ensure that the rights of victims of overseas attacks are honored and respected; researching foreign countries’ victims rights laws and advocating for U.S. victims in foreign criminal justice matters. The office works with a variety of other Department components, including the Federal Bureau of Investigation Office of Victim Assistance and the Office for Victims of Crime, as well as other departments and agencies, such as the Department of Defense and the Department of State.
Projected No. of Volunteers: 2
Internship Location(s): Washington, D.C.
Application Materials: Cover letter, resume with two references, transcript (official or unofficial), and a writing sample (not to exceed ten pages). Please submit these materials via email to nsd.ovt@usdoj.gov. Paper or faxed applications will not be considered.
Qualifications: Applicants must be able to obtain and maintain a security clearance. Applicants must be enrolled in an accredited U.S. law school at the time of application and throughout their internship. Strong research and writing skills are required. Prior interest or experience in the area of victims’ issues would be useful but is not required.
Application Deadlines: Please send all applications to the email address: nsd.ovt@usdoj.gov by COB on the date below to be accepted, approved, and on-time for the internship.
Summer:  January 31st
Academic credit: June - August (a minimum two full days per week required).
Internships are unpaid.  If your school offers interns academic or work study, we will work with you to meet school requirements whenever possible.
Assignments: Intern projects include: researching legal questions, drafting memoranda or other legal and policy analysis, factual research, and assisting with presentations and supporting materials.
 
OFFICE OF DISPUTE RESOLUTION
National Place Building
1331 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW
Washington, D.C. 20530
ATTN: Joanna M. Jacobs, Acting Director and Senior Counsel
Telephone: (202) 305-4439
Fax: (202) 616-9570
E-mail: Joanna.Jacobs@usdoj.gov
The Office of Dispute Resolution (ODR), U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) is responsible for promoting the effective use of alternative dispute resolution (ADR) processes to resolve civil litigation handled by the Department across the country. ODR advises Department attorneys in ADR use in particular cases; trains Department litigators in negotiation and mediation advocacy; and funds ADR use in particular cases. The mission of the office is to promote better resolutions in civil litigation handled by the Department, through a variety of ADR processes including mediation, arbitration, early neutral evaluation and combinations of these processes, to achieve more effective, quicker and less costly resolutions of Department litigation.
Projected No. of Volunteers: 2
Internship Location(s): Washington, D.C.
Application Materials: Resume , writing sample (no more than 8 pages), and cover letter indicating availability and background or interest in alternative dispute resolution.
Qualifications: First-year (second semester); second-year; or third year law students. Must be a U.S. citizen.
Application Deadlines: Internships are filled as applications are received. Applications deadline:
March 1st
Minimum Weeks Required: 10 weeks
Academic credit: May be able to arrange for academic credit with law school.
Assignments:  
 
 
OFFICE OF JUSTICE PROGRAMS
BUREAU of JUSTICE ASSISTANCE
810 7th Street, N.W., Room 4422
Washington, D.C. 20531
ATTN: Shanetta Y. Cutlar, Senior Advisor to the Director
Telephone: (202) 514-0195
E-mail: Shanetta.Cutlar@ojp.usdoj.gov (Subject Line: Volunteer Internship, BJA)
The Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA), Office of Justice Programs (OJP), U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) administers the Public Safety Officers' Benefits Program (PSOB) pursuant to the Public Safety Officers' Benefits Act, 42 U.S.C. 3796. The PSOB Program provides death benefits in the form of a one-time financial payment to eligible survivors of public safety officers whose deaths are the direct and proximate result of a personal injury sustained in the line of duty. The Program also provides benefits to public safety officers who are permanently and totally disabled because of injuries sustained in the line of duty. Finally, the PSOB Program provides financial assistance to help pay higher education costs for the spouses and children of public safety officers for whom PSOB death or disability benefits have been paid.
Projected No. of Volunteers: 1
Internship Location(s): Washington, D.C.
Application Materials: Resume, transcript (official or unofficial), writing sample (no more than 5 pages), and cover letter indicating availability.
Qualifications: First-year (second semester) and second-year law students. Must be a U.S. citizen.
Application Deadlines: March 1st - positions filled on a rolling basis
Minimum Weeks Required: 10 weeks
Academic credit: May possibly arrange for academic credit with law school.
Assignments: Interns will assist in performing research and preparing memoranda, drafting miscellaneous correspondence and recommending proposed action on claims for benefits filed by public safety officers and survivors of public safety officers. Duties will include reviewing, analyzing and indexing extensive medical documentation and incident reports involving line of duty deaths and injuries to assist in fact-gathering regarding the eligibility and applicability of statutory and regulatory requirements to individual claims filed by public safety officers and survivors of public safety officers.
 
 
OFFICE OF JUSTICE PROGRAMS
OFFICE FOR CIVIL RIGHTS
810 7th Street, N.W., Room 3300
Washington, D.C. 20531
ATTN: Tamara L. Baxter, Senior Attorney
Telephone: (202) 616-6484
Fax: (202) 616-9865
E-mail: Tamara.Baxter@usdoj.gov (Subject Line: Volunteer Internship, OCR)
The Office for Civil Rights (OCR), Office of Justice Programs (OJP), U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) is responsible for ensuring that recipients of federal financial assistance from the DOJ are not engaged in prohibited discrimination. The OCR ensures that no person, based on race, national origin, color, sex, religion, disability, or age is excluded from participation in, denied the benefits of, subjected to discrimination under, or denied employment in connection with any activity, program, or service receiving federal funding. The primary objective in accomplishing this mission is to secure prompt and full compliance with all civil rights laws and regulations so that needed federal financial assistance may commence or continue.
Projected No. of Volunteers: 2
Internship Location(s): Washington, D.C.
Application Materials: Resume, transcript (official or unofficial), writing sample (no more than 8 pages), and cover letter indicating availability.
Qualifications: First-year (second semester) and second-year law students. Must be a U.S. citizen.
Application Deadlines: February 1st
Minimum Weeks Required: 10 weeks
Academic credit: May possibly arrange for academic credit with law school.
Assignments: Legal research and writing on issues of civil rights compliance in federally funded programs (e.g., Title VI); legal research and writing on issues of constitutional law and jurisdiction affecting the rights of prison inmates; assist legal staff on civil rights case reviews, case management and investigations; and review Equal Employment Opportunity Plans submitted by law enforcement and other federally assisted agencies.
 
 
OFFICE OF LEGAL COUNSEL
950 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20530
ATTN: Bette Farris, Deputy Executive Officer
Fax: (202) 514-0563
E-mail: Bette.Farris@usdoj.gov (Submission via e-mail is highly preferred.)
The major function of the Office of Legal Counsel (OLC) is to draft legal opinions and provide written opinions and oral advice in response to requests from the Attorney General, Counsel to the President, various agencies of the executive branch, and offices within the Department.  These opinions cover constitutional and statutory questions from a wide range of fields, including national security, criminal law, civil rights, fiscal law, and appointment and removal authorities.   OLC also reviews pending legislation for constitutionality and reviews proposed Executive Orders and proclamations, as well as proposed Orders of the Attorney General.
Projected No. of Volunteers: 1 -2 positions
Internship Location(s): Washington, D.C.
Application Materials: Resume, transcript (unofficial is acceptable), writing sample, three references, dates available to work, and number of hours available per week (must be available at least 24 hours per week).
Qualifications: First-year (second semester), second-and third-year law students.  Excellent research and writing skills with knowledge of Lexis/Nexis and Westlaw.
Application Deadlines: Summer: January 31
Minimum Weeks Required: 6-8 weeks
Academic credit:
Assignments: Student interns will have the opportunity to work on legal opinions by performing legal research, cite checking and proofreading. Special projects may also be assigned.
 
 
OFFICE OF LEGAL POLICY
950 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W., Room 4517
Washington, D.C. 20530-0001
ATTN: Matrina Matthews
Fax: (202) 616-4566
E-mail: matrina.matthews@usdoj.gov
The mission of the Office of Legal Policy (OLP) is to plan, develop and coordinate the implementation of major legal policy initiatives of high priority to the Department and the Administration. OLP functions as a focal point for the development and coordination of Department policy.
Projected No. of Volunteers: 6
Internship Location(s): Washington, D.C.
Application Materials: Resume, transcript (official or unofficial), three references, and hours and days available.
Qualifications: First-year (second semester), second- and third-year law students. Excellent research and writing skills with a knowledge of Lexis/Nexis and Westlaw.
Application Deadlines: Open until filled
Minimum Weeks Required: 6 weeks
Academic credit: Possible work-study credit.
Assignments: The Office of Legal Policy seeks law student interns to assist the office in developing and implementing policy initiatives and to aid the office in its work related to judicial nominations. Legal interns will be called upon to conduct legal and non-legal research and analysis, to prepare memoranda and talking points, and to support nearly all stages of policy development. In addition, interns will participate in the office’s work on judicial nominations, which runs from the nomination through the confirmation process.
 
 
OFFICE OF LEGISLATIVE AFFAIRS
950 Pennsylvania Ave., N.W., Room 1145
Washington, D.C. 20530
ATTN: Saundra M. Callier
Telephone: (202) 616-9864
Fax: (202) 307-0464
E-mail: olainternship@usdoj.gov (Applications by e-mail preferred)
The Office of Legislative Affairs (OLA) has responsibility for the development and implementation of strategies to advance the Department's legislative initiatives and other interests relating to Congress. OLA also articulates the Department's position on legislation proposed by Congress, facilitates the appearance of Department witnesses at congressional hearings, and manages the interagency clearance process led by OMB. Additionally, OLA coordinates the Department's responses to congressional committee oversight requests and other inquiries from individual Members and congressional staff. OLA also participates in the Senate confirmation process for federal judges and Department nominees, such as Assistant Attorneys General and United States Attorneys. These functions are important to the Department's cooperative and productive relationship with Congress.
Projected No. of Volunteers: 3
Internship Location(s): Washington, D.C.
Application Materials: Cover letter (semester and dates when available), resume with 3 references, and an analytical writing sample of approximately 10 pages or less). Please forward submission by e-mail to olainternship@usdoj.gov.
Qualifications: Students who will have finished their second year of law school. Students who are interested in the legislative process and who want exposure to a wide variety of offices and issues within the Department of Justice are encouraged to apply. Emphasis on critical analytical skills, writing, and professional work experience.
Application Deadlines: No earlier than February 1
Minimum Weeks Required: 8 weeks full time
Academic credit:  
Assignments: OLA provides student interns with the opportunity to work closely with attorneys to prepare and organize materials for Department witnesses testifying before Congress and other projects; attend congressional hearings and briefings; review congressional correspondence and hearing transcripts; respond to Congressional inquiries and requests for information, perform legislative and/or legal research; review and track legislation introduced by Congress; and perform administrative tasks as assigned.
 
 
OFFICE OF PRIVACY AND CIVIL LIBERTIES
1331 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W. Room 1000
Washington, D.C. 20530
ATTN: Joo Y. Chung, Director
Telephone: (202) 514-0208
Email: privacy@usdoj.gov
The mission of the Office of Privacy and Civil Liberties is to protect the privacy and civil liberties of the American people by: reviewing and overseeing the Department's privacy operations and ensuring privacy compliance, including compliance with the Privacy Act of 1974 and the privacy provisions of the E-Government Act of 2002; providing legal guidance on the federal privacy laws and regulations to Department components;  developing Departmental privacy compliance  policy; overseeing privacy-related reporting to OMB and Congress; reviewing legislative and interagency proposals as it relates to federal privacy issues; and refining DOJ’s policies relating to the protection of individual informational privacy specifically in the context of DOJ’s counterterrorism and law enforcement efforts. 
Projected No. of Volunteers: 1 – 2
Internship Location(s): Washington, D.C.
Application Materials: Cover letter, resume, law school transcript (official or unofficial), and a brief writing sample.
Qualifications: Completion of first year of law school prior to commencing employment.
Application Deadlines: February 15th
Minimum Weeks Required: Must be able to work full-time.
Academic credit: Course credit is available depending on school requirements.
Assignments: Legal research and analysis in support of the Office’s privacy compliance and privacy policy development responsibilities; assisting in all aspects of publishing The Department of Justice’s Privacy Act Overview, including proofing, editing, citechecking, and caselaw analysis; other duties as assigned.
 
 
OFFICE OF PROFESSIONAL RESPONSIBILITY
950 Pennsylvania Ave., N.W., Room 3266
Washington, D.C. 20530-0001
ATTN: Lyn Hardy
Telephone: (202) 514-3365
Fax: (202) 514-5050
E-mail: Lyn.Hardy@usdoj.gov (Applications by e-mail preferred)
The Office of Professional Responsibility (OPR) is one of the Department’s two internal investigative units. OPR investigates allegations of misconduct against Department attorneys relating to the exercise of their authority to investigate, litigate or provide legal advice. OPR also investigates allegations of misconduct by law enforcement personnel when they are related to allegations of misconduct by Department attorneys. Following its investigations, OPR reports its findings and conclusions to the Deputy Attorney General or other appropriate officials.
Projected No. of Volunteers: 2
Internship Location(s): Washington, D.C.
Application Materials: Cover letter (semester and dates when available), resume with 3 references, transcript (official or unofficial), and an analytical writing sample. Please forward submission by e-mail to Lyn.Hardy@usdoj.gov.
Qualifications: Students who will have finished their second year of law school by summer 2012. Students who are interested in criminal law and ethics issues, who want to learn how to conduct effective investigations and perform factual analysis, and who want exposure to a wide variety of offices and issues within the Department of Justice are encouraged to apply. Emphasis on critical analytical skills, writing, and work experience.
Application Deadlines: January 30
Minimum Weeks Required: 8 weeks, full time
Academic credit: We will be glad to work with you for school credit or clinical credit.
Assignments: OPR provides student interns with the opportunity to work closely with attorneys conducting investigations (including collecting and reviewing information and interviewing witnesses), analyzing the law and the facts, and drafting reports. Investigations may involve all components of the Department, including the U.S. Attorneys’ Offices. Interns can expect to research discrete legal issues, conduct factual analysis, review and organize documents, draft memoranda and reports, draft witness interview summaries, and perform other tasks as required.
 
 
OFFICE OF THE SOLICITOR GENERAL
950 Pennsylvania Ave., N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20530
ATTN: Deborah C. Allen, Deputy Executive Officer
Fax: (202) 514-9769
E-mail: OSGRecruit@usdoj.gov (Submission via e-mail is highly preferred.)
The major function of the Solicitor General’s Office is to supervise and conduct government litigation in the United States Supreme Court. Virtually all such litigation is channeled through the Office of the Solicitor General and is actively conducted by the Office. The United States is involved in about two-thirds of all the cases the U.S. Supreme Court decides on the merits each year. Another function of the Office is to review all cases decided adversely to the government in the lower courts to determine whether they should be appealed and, if so, what position should be taken. The Solicitor General also determines whether the government will participate as an amicus curiae, or intervene, in cases in any appellate court.
Projected No. of Volunteers: 2 - 4
Internship Location(s): Washington, D.C.
Application Materials: Resume, transcript (unofficial is acceptable), writing sample, three references, dates available to work, and number of hours available per week (must be available at least 24 hours per week).
Qualifications: Students who will have finished their second year of law school by the end of the preceding summer. Students who are interested in constitutional law, and who want exposure to a wide variety of offices and issues within the Department of Justice are encouraged to apply. Emphasis on critical analytical skills, writing, and work experience.
Application Deadline: March 15th
Minimum Weeks Required: 8 weeks
Academic credit: Possible work-study credit.
Assignments: Student interns will have the opportunity to attend Supreme Court arguments and work on Supreme Court cases by performing legal research, cite checking and proofreading. Special projects may also be assigned.
 
 
OFFICE OF THE PARDON ATTORNEY
1425 New York Avenue, Suite 11000
Washington, D.C. 20530
ATTN: Ronald L. Rodgers, Pardon Attorney
Telephone: (202) 616-6070
Fax: (202) 616-6069
E-mail: Ronald.Rodgers@usdoj.gov
The mission of the Office of the Pardon Attorney is to advise the President on the exercise of his power to grant clemency for offenses against the United States, pursuant to Article II, § 2 of the Constitution. The Office processes petitions for all forms of clemency, including pardon, commutation of sentence, and remission of fine, by conducting the necessary investigation on each petition and preparing a report and recommendation to the President for the signature of the Deputy Attorney General, as well as by preparing documents, such as warrants of clemency and notices of denial, necessary to implement the President’s decisions. The Office also acts as liaison with the applicant and the public throughout the pendency of the clemency case, and is the repository of records concerning grants of clemency over the years.
Projected No. of Volunteers: 2
Internship Location(s): Washington, D.C. – Preference will be given to law students in the metropolitan Washington, D.C. area.
Application Materials: Resume, transcript (official or unofficial), writing sample, and dates when available for internship.
Qualifications: Second-year law students. Must have word processing skills. Paralegal experience helpful but not required. Students with an interest in criminal justice, constitutional law, or administrative law would be good matches for this Office.
Application Deadline: Applications will be reviewed as received, and should be received no later than February 28th . Position will be open until filled.
Minimum Weeks Required: 9 weeks
Academic credit: Possible work-study.
Assignments: Interns will assist the Office’s attorneys and paralegals in case-processing tasks, such as obtaining the reports needed to evaluate a clemency case and preparing drafts of reports to the President on selected cases, and will prepare responses to correspondence. Special research projects may be assigned by Office attorneys as need dictates, and may include historical and legal research.
 
 
OFFICE OF TRIBAL JUSTICE
950 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W., Room 2314
Washington, D.C. 20530
ATTN: Intern Coordinator
Telephone: (202) 514-8812
Fax: (202) 514-9078
The Office of Tribal Justice (OTJ) coordinates DOJ's policies and positions on American Indian and Alaska Native issues. OTJ works with federally recognized tribes on a variety of issues, and fulfills the roles of liaison and primary point of contact for tribes dealing with DOJ and other federal agencies. OTJ also provides legal expertise on Indian legal issues within DOJ and to other federal agencies and serves as the clearinghouse for DOJ correspondence relating to Indian matters.
Projected No. of Volunteers: 4
Internship Location(s): Washington, DC
Application Materials: Please submit a resume, together with a cover letter, official transcript, three references, a writing sample and dates available.
Qualifications: All full-time, second- or third-year law students. Students should have excellent academic credentials, good writing skills, basic knowledge of federal Indian law and some familiarity with tribes.
Application Deadline: January 15, 2012
Minimum Weeks Required: 10 weeks
Academic credit: Academic credit for work experience possible.
Assignments: The internship is designed to give students the opportunity to gain first-hand experience working on challenging projects and cases principally involving issues of federal Indian law. Interns work closely with attorneys in OTJ on a wide range of Indian law issues and projects. Work may include legal research, drafting legal memoranda and briefs, participating in public policy development, reviewing proposed legislation, and responding to citizen correspondence. Also, interns may have the opportunity to attend Congressional hearings, oral arguments before the Supreme Court, and high-level meetings with OTJ attorneys.
Website: www.justice.gov/otj/index.html
 
TAX DIVISION
ATTN: Intern Coordinator
Telephone: (202) 514-6722
Email: lawinterns.taxdivision@usdoj.gov
Appellate Section: The Appellate Section handles appeals of civil tax cases in the U.S. Courts of Appeals and participates with the Office of the Solicitor General in proceedings before the Supreme Court. The cases present a variety of legal issues involving federal tax law, bankruptcy law, constitutional law, and commercial law, as well as the panoply of evidentiary, procedural, and jurisdictional issues that are the staple of any litigation docket.
Financial Litigation Unit (FLU): The FLU pursues collection after the civil trial sections of the Tax Division obtain money judgments. The FLU investigates sources of collection and litigates to assert the United States' interests in the assets found through post-judgment discovery, supplemental court proceedings and foreclosure suits.
Projected No. of Volunteers: 2 positions (Appellate); 3 positions (FLU)
Internship Location(s): Washington, D.C.
Application Materials: Please submit a resume, writing sample, and law school transcripts (official or unofficial) with a letter of intent to the email address indicated above.
Qualifications: Law students with a strong academic record and excellent legal research and writing skills.
Application Deadlines: February 15th
Minimum Weeks Required: Six weeks full-time
Academic credit: Work-study credit only may be available.
Assignments: Appellate: Legal interns work closely with Tax Division attorneys and are frequently asked to research legal issues that arise in pending cases. Interns may prepare legal memoranda and draft substantive motions or portions of a brief, or help attorneys prepare for oral argument. The Division attempts to ensure that interns assist in as many aspects of the Division's work as possible, and that interns are provided written or oral feedback on their assignments. Interns must be able to grasp issues quickly, conduct thorough and accurate research, and write clearly, concisely, and persuasively.

FLU: Working with attorneys and paralegals, interns participate in many aspects of civil litigation. They assist with post-judgment discovery, including drafting interrogatories, document requests and subpoenas, and gathering and analyzing judgment debtor's financial information. Interns also draft foreclosure complaints and motions and prepare research memoranda. There may also be opportunities to observe depositions and court hearings, help moot attorneys preparing for hearings or trials, and attend training sessions held for Tax Division attorneys.
 
 
U.S. MARSHALS SERVICE
OFFICE OF GENERAL COUNSEL

241 18th Street
Arlington, Virginia 22202
ATTN: Amanda Eller Choi
Telephone: (202) 353-3277
Fax: (202) 307-9456
Email: Amanda Eller Choi@usdoj.gov.
The U.S. Marshals Service’s (USMS) Office of General Counsel provides legal services and guidance to all headquarters and field components of the USMS for all matters that may arise in the conduct of USMS missions including judicial security, fugitive apprehension, prisoner transportation, asset seizure and forfeiture, as well as providing guidance and assistance in the areas of government ethics, administrative law and civil litigation.
Projected No. of Volunteers: 6 – 8
Internship Location(s): Arlington, VA (Crystal City)
Application Materials: Cover letter (dates when available), resume, transcript (official or unofficial), and writing sample.
Qualifications: First- and second-year law students.
Application Deadlines: Closed
Minimum Weeks Required: 6 weeks
Academic credit: Work study credit (if available through law school).
Assignments: USMS’s Office of General Counsel (OGC) offers interns the opportunity to work closely with attorneys in multiple aspects of OGC work. Interns will assist in the review and make recommendations for the adjudication of claims filed under the Federal Tort Claims Act. Interns can expect to conduct research, draft memoranda and correspondence, interact with agency officials, and perform other tasks as required.
 
 
U.S. TRUSTEE PROGRAM
441 G Street, N.W., Suite 6150
Washington, D.C. 20530
ATTN: Duane Currie, Human Resources Specialist
Telephone: (202) 616-1020
Fax: (202) 616-1192
E-mail: Duane.Currie@usdoj.gov (Applications by e-mail highly preferred)
The U.S. Trustee Program (USTP) is a component of the Department of Justice and has the legal authority to appear in every bankruptcy case filed in the United States, from chapter 7 liquidations to major chapter 11 business reorganizations. As a result, USTP employees headquartered in Washington, D.C., and in our 95 field offices throughout the country handle a wide range of challenging and significant matters as we strive to promote the integrity and efficiency of the bankruptcy system by enforcing bankruptcy laws and providing oversight of private trustees. Of particular importance of the Program’s efforts to address fraud and abuse by debtors, creditors, attorneys, and others in the bankruptcy system by taking formal and informal actions in a civil context and making criminal referrals to and working with the U.S. Attorneys.
Projected No. of Volunteers: Executive Office (2 – 3); Field Offices (varies by office)
Internship Location(s): Field offices nationwide, http://www.justice.gov/ust/eo/ust_org/office_locator.htm, and the Executive Office for United States Trustees (EOUST), Office of General Counsel in Washington, D.C.
Application Materials: Cover letter, resume, writing sample, and transcript (official or unofficial). Please indicate in your cover letter or e-mail your geographical location preference.
Qualifications: First-year (second semester) and second-year law students may apply for summer internships. Must be a U.S. citizen. Superior research and writing skills, an eye for detail, a desire to work as part of a small team of professionals, and a commitment to fairness and integrity in the administration of the bankruptcy laws are essential. Excellent opportunity for students with a background and interest in policy making, bankruptcy, administrative law, and legislative matters.
Application Deadlines: February 28th Applications may be considered on a rolling basis.
Minimum Weeks Required: 8 weeks, but many students stay longer (full summer strongly preferred).
Academic credit: Work-study credit only.
Assignments: Field Office: Assist field office attorneys in: preparing for bankruptcy court appearances, developing bankruptcy fraud referrals, screening cases for debtor abuse of the Bankruptcy Code and filing motions to dismiss cases, reviewing documents in Chapter 11 cases and filing motions and objections in such cases, and monitoring Section 341 meetings between debtors and creditors. Please include your geographic preferences in your cover letter.

Washington, D.C.: Assist EOUST Office of General Counsel (OGC), Appellate Practice and Civil Enforcement Unit attorneys in preparing litigation an appeals, providing advice on litigation matters to the field, interpreting the new Bankruptcy Abuse Prevention and Consumer Protection Act of 2005, responding to Congressional inquiries, and other duties relating to policy and administration.


The U.S. Department of Justice is an Equal Opportunity/Reasonable Accommodation Employer. Except where otherwise provided by law, there will be no discrimination because of color, race, religion, national origin, political affiliation, marital status, disability (physical or mental), age, sex, gender identity, sexual orientation, genetic information, status as a parent, membership or non-membership in an employee organization, on the basis of personal favoritism, or any non merit factor. The Department of Justice welcomes and encourages applications from persons with physical and mental disabilities. The Department is firmly committed to satisfying its affirmative obligations under the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, to ensure that persons with disabilities have every opportunity to be hired and advanced on the basis of merit within the Department of Justice. This agency provides reasonable accommodation to applicants with disabilities where appropriate. If you need a reasonable accommodation for any part of the application and hiring process, please notify the agency. Determinations on requests for reasonable accommodation will be made on a case-by-case basis. It is the policy of the Department to achieve a drug-free workplace and persons selected for employment will be required to pass a drug test which screens for illegal drug use prior to final appointment. Employment is also contingent upon the completion and satisfactory adjudication of a background investigation. Only U.S. citizens are eligible for employment with the Executive Office for Immigration Review and the United States Attorneys' Offices. Unless otherwise indicated in a particular job advertisement, non-U.S. Citizens may apply for employment with other organizations, but should be advised that appointments of non-U.S. Citizens are extremely rare; such appointments would be possible only if necessary to accomplish the Department's mission and would be subject to strict security requirements. Applicants who hold dual citizenship in the U.S. and another country will be considered on a case-by-case basis.

There is no formal rating system for applying veterans' preference to attorney appointments in the excepted service; however, the Department of Justice considers veterans' preference eligibility as a positive factor in attorney hiring. Applicants eligible for veterans' preference must include that information in their cover letter or resume and attach supporting documentation (e.g., the DD 214, Certificate of Release or Discharge from Active Duty and other supporting documentation) to their submissions. Although the "point" system is not used, per se, applicants eligible to claim 10-point preference must submit Standard Form (SF) 15, Application for 10-Point Veteran Preference, and submit the supporting documentation required for the specific type of preference claimed (visit the OPM website, www.opm.gov/forms/pdf_fill/SF15.pdf for a copy of SF 15, which lists the types of 10-point preferences and the required supporting document(s). Applicants should note that SF 15 requires supporting documentation associated with service-connected disabilities or receipt of nonservice-connected disability pensions to be dated 1991 or later except in the case of service members submitting official statements or retirement orders from a branch of the Armed Forces showing that his or her retirement was due to a permanent service-connected disability or that he/she was transferred to the permanent disability retired list (the statement or retirement orders must indicate that the disability is 10% or more).