Telecommunications Appendix A

(1)

Question-by-Question Results from the Component Questionnaire

For the purpose of analyzing the telecommunications data, the Department has divided agencies into the following categories:

Cabinet-level agencies and large agencies (10,000 or more employees)
Mid-sized agencies (1,000-9,999 employees)
Small agencies (100-999 employees)
Very small agencies (fewer than 100 employees)

See General Appendix A (list of agencies by size category).

1. Does your component provide telephonic access to members of the public who have speech or hearing impairments and who use TTY's (text typewriter, sometimes also called a "TDD," or "telecommunications device for deaf persons") by advertising and maintaining dedicated TTY telephone lines that are staffed in a manner equal to that of your standard telephone lines or by ensuring TTY access to your standard lines for incoming callers?

(Choose one)  Yes  No  N/A

Response "yes:" components providing direct access to TTY callers, comparable to others

Seventy-six of 146 components of cabinet level and large agencies provide service to incoming TTY callers that is comparable to the service provided to others (45%*). Fifteen of 17 mid-sized agencies (82%*) advertise and maintain TTY telephone lines that are staffed in a manner equal to that of their standard incoming telephone lines. Eleven of 22 components of small agencies (59%*) provide direct telephonic access to TTY callers. Eight of 21 very small agencies (46%*) provide direct telephonic access to TTY callers.

Response "no:" components not providing comparable direct access to TTY callers

Fifty-seven of 146 components of cabinet level and large agencies indicated that they do not provide direct access to TTY callers (49%*). Only 2 mid-sized agencies do not (18%). Eleven of 22 components of small agencies (41%*) and 12 of the 21 very small agencies chose "no" (50%).

Response "not applicable:" remaining components

Thirteen of 146 components of cabinet level and large agencies chose the response "not applicable," indicating either that the components misunderstood the question or that they do not have telephone lines available to members of the public who wish to call them (6%*). No mid-sized or small agencies chose this response. Only 1 very small agency chose the response "not applicable" (4%).

2. Is your incoming call sequencing system, if any, able to acknowledge a TTY call, send a "wait" message to the caller, and accept the call in sequence?

(Choose one)  Yes  No  N/A

Response "yes:" components maintaining incoming call sequencing systems that provide comparable access to TTY callers

Twenty-four of 146 components of cabinet level and large agencies (4%*) and 4 of 17 mid-sized agencies (18%*) maintain incoming call sequencing systems that are able to acknowledge TTY calls, send "wait" messages to the caller, and accept the TTY calls in sequence. Only 2 small agencies chose "yes" (9%*), compared with 6 of 21 very small agencies (41%*).

Response "no:" components maintaining incoming call sequencing systems that do not provide comparable access to TTY callers

Seventy-two of 146 components of cabinet level and large agencies (53%*) and 6 of 17 mid-sized agencies (30%*) have incoming call sequencing systems that are not directly usable by TTY users. Sixteen of 22 components of small agencies (78%*) and 10 of 21 very small agencies (42%*) chose "no."

Response "not applicable:" components presumably not maintaining incoming call sequencing systems

Fifty of 146 components of cabinet level and large agencies (42%*) and 7 of 17 mid-sized agencies (52%*) chose the "not applicable" response to question 2, likely indicating that they do not have incoming call sequencing systems. Four of 22 components of small agencies (13%*) and 5 of 21 very small agencies (17%*) chose "not applicable."

3. Do all employees who communicate telephonically with members of the public or with other Federal employees have access to TTY's or equivalent technology at their workstations to receive calls placed by TTY users?

(Choose one)  Yes  No  N/A

Response "yes:" components providing TTY's or equivalent technology to all employees who use telephones

Thirty-eight of 146 components of cabinet level and large agencies (4%*) and 5 of 17 mid-sized agencies provide access to TTY's or equivalent technology at their employees' workstations (35%*). Only 1 small agency chose "yes" (3.5%*), while 6 of 21 very small agencies did so (33%*).

Response "no:" components not providing TTY's or equivalent technology to all employees who use telephones

One hundred one of 146 components of cabinet level and large agencies (95%*) and 12 of 17 mid-sized agencies do not provide access to TTY's or equivalent technology at employees' workstations (65%*). Eighteen of 22 components of small agencies (87%*) and 14 of 21 very small agencies chose "no" (64%).

Response "not applicable:" remaining components

Seven of 146 components of cabinet level and large agencies (less than 1%*), no mid-sized agencies, 3 of 22 components of small agencies (9%*), and only 1 very small agency (3%) chose "not applicable."

4. Have all employees who communicate telephonically with members of the public or with other Federal employees who do not have access to TTY's or equivalent technology at their workstations received specific training on how to make and receive calls through the Telephone Relay Service?

(Choose one)  Yes  No  N/A

Response "yes:" components routinely training employees to use the Telephone Relay Service

Eighteen of 146 components of cabinet level and large agencies (1%*) and 4 of 17 mid-sized agencies (17%*) routinely train their employees in how to make and accept calls through the Telephone Relay Service. Four of 22 components of small agencies (10%*) and 4 of 21 very small agencies (24%*) chose "yes."

Response "no:" components not routinely training employees to use the Telephone Relay Service

One hundred nine of 146 components of cabinet level and large agencies (84%*) and 12 of 17 mid-sized agencies (79%*) do not routinely train their employees how to use the Telephone Relay Service. Sixteen of 22 components of small agencies (82%*) and 15 of 21 very small agencies (69%*) chose "no."

Response "not applicable:" components either providing TTY's at all workstations or not understanding the question

Nineteen of 146 components of cabinet level and large agencies (15%*) and only 1 mid-sized agency (3%*) chose "not applicable." These agencies presumably either provide TTY's or equivalent technology at all workstations or they misunderstand the question. Two small agency components chose "not applicable (8%*), as did 2 very small agencies (7%*).

5. If your component uses any automated information services with prerecorded voice messages, for each such message, is the same information available in a text messaging mode that would support equivalent information access by TTY users?

(Choose one)  Yes  No  N/A

Response "yes:" components making their automated information services available to TTY callers

Nineteen of 146 components of cabinet level and large agencies (3%*) and 4 of 17 mid-sized agencies (19%*) make automated information services available to TTY users to the same extent as they are available to those who can hear pre-recorded voice messages. Only 2 small agencies (8%*) make their automated information services accessible to TTY callers. No very small agency chose "yes."

Response "no:" components not making their automated information services available to TTY callers

Ninety-nine of 146 components of cabinet level and large agencies (94%*) and 12 of 17 mid-sized agencies (71%*) do not make automated information services available to TTY users to the same extent as they are available to those who can use pre-recorded voice messages. Seventeen of 22 components of small agencies (86%*) and 15 of 21 very small agencies (70%*) chose "no."

Response "not applicable:" remaining components presumably not using automated information services with prerecorded voice messages

Twenty-eight of 146 components of cabinet level and large agencies (2%*) and only 1 mid-sized agency (10%*) chose "not applicable," presumably indicating that it does not offer automated information services with pre-recorded voice messages. Three of 22 components of small agencies (6%*) and 6 of 21 very small agencies (30%*) chose "not applicable."

6. Do the TTY's (or equivalent technology) used by your component support other types of signals other than Baudot tones?

(Choose one)  Yes  No  N/A

Response "yes:" components providing TTY's that support types of signals other than Baudot tones

Twenty-six of 146 components of cabinet level and large agencies (7%*) and 2 of 17 mid-sized agencies (21%*) use TTY's or equivalent technology that supports signals other than just Baudot tones. Only 2 small agencies (9%*) answered "yes," as did 2 very small agencies (16%*).

Response "no:" components providing TTY's that only support Baudot tones

Eighty-one of 146 components of cabinet level and large agencies (33%*) and 12 of 17 mid-sized agencies (62%*) use TTY's or equivalent technology that does not support signals other than Baudot tones. Twelve of 22 components of small agencies (67%*) and 9 of 21 very small agencies (47%*) chose "no."

Response "not applicable:" remaining components

Thirty-nine of 146 components of cabinet level and large agencies (60%*) and 3 of 17 mid-sized agencies (17%*) do not use TTY's or equivalent technology. Eight of 22 components of small agencies (24%*) and 10 of 21 very small agencies (37%*) chose "not applicable."

7. If your component uses pagers, is the system designed to handle both audible and visual display pagers?

(Choose one)  Yes  No  N/A

Response "yes:" components providing a choice of audible or visual display pagers

Ninety-seven of 146 components of cabinet level and large agencies (84%*) and 14 of 17 mid-sized agencies (86%*) have accessible paging systems that provide users a choice of audible or visual display pagers. Eight of 22 components of small agencies (33%*) and 2 of 21 very small agencies (16%*) chose "yes."

Response "no:" components providing pagers, but not offering a choice of audible or visual displays

Twenty-nine of 146 components of cabinet level and large agencies (7%*) and 3 of 17 mid-sized agencies (14%*) use paging systems that are not designed to handle both audible and visual display pagers. Seven of 22 components of small agencies (27%*) and 2 of 21 very small agencies (19%*) chose "no."

Response "not applicable:" components presumably not providing pagers

Twenty of 146 components of cabinet level and large agencies (9%*) chose "not applicable," presumably indicating that they do not provide pagers to any employees. No mid-sized agencies chose this answer. Seven of 22 components of small agencies (40%*) and 17 of 21 very small agencies (65%*) chose "not applicable."

8. If your component uses pagers, is there a non-audible alternative to a "beep" notification for incoming pages, such as a vibration signal?

(Choose one)  Yes  No  N/A

Response "yes:" components providing pagers equipped vibration capability or other means of giving a non-audible alternative to a "beep" notification for incoming pages

One hundred fourteen of 146 components of cabinet level and large agencies (84%*) and 16 of 17 mid-sized agencies (96%*) provide pagers that are equipped with a non-audible alternative to a "beep" notification for incoming pages. Thirteen of 22 components of small agencies (52%*) and 3 of 21 very small agencies (26%*) chose "yes."

Response "no:" components providing pagers that are not equipped with any non-audible alternative to a "beep" notification for incoming pages

Fourteen of 146 components of cabinet level and large agencies (7%*) and only 1 mid-sized agency (4%*) indicated that its pagers are not equipped with any non-audible alternative to a "beep" notification for incoming pages. Two of 22 components of small agencies (8%*) and no very small agency chose "no."

Response "not applicable:" components presumably not providing pagers

Eighteen of 146 components of cabinet level and large agencies (8%*) and no mid-sized agencies chose "not applicable." Seven of 22 components of small agencies (40%*) and 18 very small agencies (74%*) chose "not applicable."

9. If provided, are the following enhanced features of your component's telephone system accessible to persons with visual impairments or can they easily be made accessible using compatible assistive technology?

a. caller ID

b. message waiting notification

c. all other visual information or status cues

9(a): Response "yes:" components providing a means for employees who are blind or who have low vision to use caller ID

Fifty-six of 146 components of cabinet level and large agencies (23%*) and 7 of 17 mid-sized agencies (36%*) indicated that they have a non-visual means of providing caller ID. Four of 22 components of small agencies (18%*) and 4 of 21 very small agencies (19%*) chose "yes."

9(a): Response "no:" components not providing a means for employees who are blind or who have low vision to use caller ID

Fifty-six of 146 components of cabinet level and large agencies (35%*) and 6 of 17 mid-sized agencies (51%*) indicated that they do not provide a means of making the caller ID feature accessible to persons who are blind or who have low vision. Nine of 22 components of small agencies (48%*) and 5 of 21 very small agencies (31%*) chose "no."

9(a): Response "not applicable:" components presumably not providing caller ID

Thirty-four of 146 components of cabinet level and large agencies (42%*) and 4 of 17 mid-sized agencies (13%) chose "not applicable," presumably indicating that they do not provide a caller ID feature for their telephone system. Nine of 22 components of small agencies (34%*) and 12 of 21 very small agencies (50%*) chose "not applicable."

9(b): Response "yes:" components providing a means for employees who are blind or who have low vision to use message waiting notification

Ninety-one of 146 components of cabinet level and large agencies (46%*) and 10 of 17 mid-sized agencies (59%) indicated that they provide a non-visual alternative to their message waiting notification service. Eleven of 22 components of small agencies (49%*) and 9 of 21 very small agencies (40%*) chose "yes."

9(b): Response "no:" components not providing a means for employees who are blind or who have low vision to use message waiting notification

Thirty-seven of 146 components of cabinet level and large agencies (31%*) and 7 of 17 mid-sized agencies (41%*) indicated that they do not provide a means for employees who are blind or who have low vision to use their message waiting notification service. Seven of 22 components of small agencies (35%*) and 4 of 21 very small agencies (21%*) chose "no."

9(b): Response "not applicable:" components presumably not providing message waiting notification

Eighteen of 146 components of cabinet level and large agencies (23%*) and no mid-sized agencies chose "not applicable," presumably indicating that they do not provide message waiting notification for their employees. Four of 22 components of small agencies (16%*) and 8 of 21 very small agencies (39%*) chose "not applicable."

9(c): Response "yes:" components providing a means for employees who are blind or who have low vision to use all other visual information or status cues on telephones

Fifty-five of 146 components of cabinet level and large agencies (20%*) and 7 of 17 mid-sized agencies (37%*) provide a means for employees who are blind or who have low vision to use all other visual information or status cues that are provided with their telephone services. Six of 22 components of small agencies (18%*) and 11 of 21 very small agencies (55%*) chose "yes."

9(c): Response "no:" components not providing a means for employees who are blind or who have low vision to use all other visual information or status cues on telephones

Sixty-one of 146 components of cabinet level and large agencies (56%*) and 8 of 17 mid-sized agencies (58%*) do not provide a means for employees who are blind or who have low vision to use all other visual information or status cues that are provided with their telephone services. Ten of 22 components of small agencies (57%*) and 3 of 21 very small agencies (17%*) chose "no."

9(c): Response "not applicable:" components presumably not providing any other visual information or status cues on telephones

Thirty of 146 components of cabinet level and large agencies (24%*) and two mid-sized agencies (5%*) chose "not applicable," presumably indicating that they do not have any other visual information or status cues provided with their telephone services. Six of 22 components of small agencies (25%*) and 7 of 21 very small agencies (28%*) chose "not applicable."

10. If your component operates any telephone lines that require serial choices for proper connection (e.g., "press 1 for [blank], press 2 for [blank], etc."), or if the system requires a caller to spell a person's name with the telephone keypads for connection purposes, answer the following:

a. Is there always an option to press 0 to connect with an operator for assistance?

b. If "yes," are the operators available at all times the lines are in use?

c. If timed defaults are used, is there a way for the caller to set the default time?

d. Is there a voice-operated option for persons who cannot press telephone keypads?

e. Is the system accessible to TTY users?

10(a) & (b) Response "yes:" agencies providing operator assistance from their automated incoming call connection systems

Seventy-five of 146 components of cabinet level and large agencies (13%*) provide operator assistance from their automated incoming call connection systems. Of these, 33 components' operators are available at all times the lines are in use (3%*) while 42 components' operators are not (9%*).

Twelve of 17 mid-sized agencies (80%*) provide operator assistance from their automated incoming call connection systems. Of these, 7 agencies' operators are available at all times the lines are in use while 5 agencies' operators are not (30%*).

Fourteen of 22 components of small agencies (72%*) provide operator assistance from their automated incoming call connection systems. Six of these have operators who are available at all times the lines are in use (19%*) while 8 others are not (53%*).

Eleven of 21 very small agencies (65%*) provide operator assistance from their automated incoming call connection systems. Seven of these have operators who are available at all times the lines are in use (43%*) while 4 do not (22%*).

10(a) Response "no:" agencies not providing operator assistance from their automated incoming call connection systems

Relatively few agencies do not provide operator assistance for their automated incoming call connection systems, including 36 of 146 components of cabinet level and large agencies (83%*), 4 of 17 mid-sized agencies (18%*), and 4 of 22 components of small agencies (19%*). Only 2 of 21 very small agencies (6%*) chose "no."

10(a) Response "not applicable:" agencies presumably not providing automated incoming call connection systems

Thirty-five of 146 components of cabinet level and large agencies (4%*) chose "not applicable," presumably indicating that they do not provide automated incoming call connection systems. Only 1 of 17 mid-sized agencies chose "not applicable" (2%*). Four of 22 components of small agencies (9%*) and 8 of 21 very small agencies (28%*) also chose "not applicable."

10(c) Response "yes:" agencies using timed defaults that can be adjusted by the caller for their automated incoming call connection systems

Nine of 146 components of cabinet level and large agencies (1%*) indicated that they use timed defaults on their automated incoming call connection systems that can be adjusted by the caller. No mid-sized, small, or very small agencies chose "yes."

10(c) Response "no:" agencies maintaining automated incoming call connection systems which use timed defaults that cannot be adjusted by the caller

Seventy-three of 146 components of cabinet level and large agencies (65%*) and 12 of 17 mid-sized agencies (63%*) use automated incoming call connection systems which have timed defaults that cannot be adjusted by callers. Eight of 22 components of small agencies (49%*) and 5 of 21 very small agencies (24%*) chose "no."

10(c) Response "not applicable:" agencies not maintaining automated incoming call connection systems or maintaining systems which do not use timed defaults

Sixty-four of 146 components of cabinet level and large agencies (34%*) and 5 of 17 mid-sized agencies (37%*) do not maintain automated incoming call connection systems or maintain systems which do not use timed defaults. Fourteen of 22 components of small agencies (51%*) and 16 of 21 very small agencies (76%*) chose "not applicable."

10(d) Response "yes:" agencies maintaining automated incoming call connection systems which allow callers to use a voice operated option

Seventeen of 146 components of cabinet level and large agencies (6%*) and 3 of 17 mid-sized agencies (13%*) maintain automated incoming call connection systems which allow callers to operate the system through voice, rather than requiring them to activate touch-tone buttons. No small agencies chose "yes," while 4 of 21 very small agencies chose this answer (19%*).

10(d) Response "no:" agencies maintaining automated incoming call connection systems which do not allow callers to use a voice operated option

Ninety-five of 146 components of cabinet level and large agencies (89%*) and 13 of 17 mid-sized agencies (85%*) maintain automated incoming call connection systems which require callers to activate touch-tone buttons. Eighteen of 22 components of small agencies (91%*) and 11 of 21 very small agencies (69%*) chose "no."

10(d) Response "not applicable:" agencies presumably not maintaining automated incoming call connection systems

Thirty-four of 146 components of cabinet level and large agencies (5%*) chose "not applicable," presumably indicating that they do not have automated incoming call connection systems. Only 1 mid-sized agency chose "not applicable" (2%*). Four of 22 components of small agencies (9%*) and 6 of 21 very small agencies (12%*) chose this response.

10(e) Response "yes:" agencies maintaining automated incoming call connection systems that are accessible to TTY users

Thirty-eight of 146 components of cabinet level and large agencies (5%*) and 4 of 17 mid-sized agencies (29%*) maintain automated incoming call connection systems that are accessible to TTY users. Two of 22 components of small agencies (16%*) and 4 of 21 very small agencies (22%*) chose "yes."

10(e) Response "no:" agencies not maintaining an automated incoming call connection system that is accessible to TTY users

Seventy-three of 146 components of cabinet level and large agencies (72%*) and 12 of 17 mid-sized agencies (69%*) maintain automated incoming call connection systems, but reported that those systems are not accessible to TTY users. Sixteen of 22 components of small agencies (75%*) and 9 of 21 very small agencies (50%*) chose "no."

10(e) Response "not applicable:" agencies presumably not maintaining an automated incoming call connection system

Thirty-five of 146 components of cabinet level and large agencies (23%*) chose "not applicable," presumably indicating that they do not maintain an automated incoming call connection system. Only 1 mid-sized agency chose "not applicable" (2%*). Four of 22 components of small agencies (9%*) and 8 of 21 very small agencies (28%*) also chose this response.

11. What is the best description of the overall extent to which your telecommunications systems are accessible to and usable by persons with disabilities?

(a) major applications are generally accessible;

(b) generally accessible (a few problems exclude some persons with disabilities from "fringe" areas of our major applications, but generally all people with disabilities can use and navigate all major applications appropriately);

(c) problems with some of our major applications exclude one or more communities of people with disabilities from using them, but other major applications are generally accessible; or

(d) major applications are generally inaccessible to one or more communities of persons with disabilities.

Response "a:" agencies describing their major telecommunications applications as generally accessible

Nineteen of 146 components of cabinet level and large agencies (5%*) and 3 of 17 mid-sized agencies (20%*) describe their major telecommunications applications as generally being accessible to persons with disabilities. Only 2 of 22 components of small agencies (4%*) chose response "a," along with 4 of 21 very small agencies (21%*).

Response "b:" agencies describing their major telecommunications applications as generally accessible, while recognizing problems in fringe areas

Fifty-four of 146 components of cabinet level and large agencies (6%*) and 8 of 17 mid-sized agencies (48%*) describe their major telecommunications applications as generally accessible, though they recognize there are some fringe aspects of these applications that pose accessibility problems to some users with disabilities. Seven of 22 components of small agencies (34%*) and 6 of 21 very small agencies (42%*) also chose "b."

Response "c:" agencies describing some of their telecommunications applications as excluding one or more communities of persons with disabilities

Forty of 146 components of cabinet level and large agencies (40%*) and 2 of 17 mid-sized agencies (18%*) indicated that some of their telecommunications applications are not accessible to one or more communities of persons with disabilities. Nine of 22 components of small agencies (38%*) and 6 of 21 very small agencies (25%*) chose "c."

Response "d:" agencies describing their major telecommunications applications as excluding one or more communities of persons with disabilities

Thirty-three of 146 components of cabinet level and large agencies (49%*) and 4 of 17 mid-sized agencies (14%*) describe their major telecommunications applications as excluding one or more communities of persons with disabilities. Four of 22 components of small agencies (24%*) and 5 of 21 very small agencies (12%*) chose "d."


1. This document is available on the Department of Justice's section 508 Web site (www.usdoj.gov/crt/508). People with disabilities may request copies in Braille, large print, or on computer disk by calling 1-800-514-0301 (voice) or 1-800-514-0383 (TTY).


Back to the Table of Contents

Updated August 6, 2015