Justice News

Department of Justice
Executive Office for Immigration Review

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday, September 9, 2013
New York Immigration Judge Participates in Naturalization Ceremony

NEW YORK -- Immigration Judge Terry A. Bain from the Executive Office for Immigration Review, New York Immigration Court, delivered the keynote speech and administered the oath of allegiance to approximately 150 candidates during a naturalization ceremony at 26 Federal Plaza in New York on September 6, 2013. The New York District Office of U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, Department of Homeland Security, hosted the ceremony.

Biographical Information

Attorney General Janet Reno appointed Judge Bain in February 1994. Judge Bain received a bachelor of arts degree in 1973 from George Washington University, and a juris doctorate in 1980 from Brooklyn Law School. From 1986 to 1994, she worked as an attorney for Whitman, Breed, Abbott & Morgan in New York. From 1981 to 1986, she worked in private practice with Barst & Mukamal in New York. Judge Bain is a member of the New York State Bar.

- EOIR -

The Executive Office for Immigration Review (EOIR) is an agency within the Department of Justice. Under delegated authority from the Attorney General, immigration judges and the Board of Immigration Appeals interpret and adjudicate immigration cases according to United States immigration laws. EOIR’s immigration judges conduct administrative court proceedings in immigration courts located throughout the nation. They determine whether foreign-born individuals—whom the Department of Homeland Security charges with violating immigration law—should be ordered removed from the United States or should be granted relief from removal and be permitted to remain in this country. The Board of Immigration Appeals primarily reviews appeals of decisions by immigration judges. EOIR’s Office of the Chief Administrative Hearing Officer adjudicates immigration-related employment cases. EOIR is committed to ensuring fairness in all of the cases it adjudicates.

Updated February 26, 2015