Meet Luis

Valuing Diversity

Meet Luis

As the son of immigrant parents and the first in my family
to go to college, I was inspired by the Attorney General’s
call to public service and the Department’s need to attract
individuals from all backgrounds with a strong desire to help our
country live up to its ideals.


Photo of Luis

I first came to the Department from Los Angeles as a summer intern
assigned to the Misdemeanor Trial Section of the U.S. Attorney’s
Office in the District of Columbia. I decided to go to law school
and thought the Department would provide the perfect opportunity to
become immersed in the law. Between the fast-paced and demanding environment
of the Section, I looked for opportunities to learn about all of the
different ways the Department made a difference in people’s
lives. I quickly learned that the Department’s impact is tied
directly to the dedication, commitment, and passion of the people
who work every day to fulfill its mission, a message that the Attorney
General made clear during the welcoming address for new interns. As
I sat in the Great Hall listening to the Attorney General, I was inspired
by the call to public service and the Department’s need to attract
individuals from all backgrounds with a strong desire to help our
country live up to its ideals. As the son of immigrant parents and
the first in my family to go to college, I was convinced that I could
make valuable contributions to the Department’s purpose. While
attending law school in California and with encouragement from my
mentors and family, I applied to the Attorney General’s Honor
Program and found my way back to D.C.

As an attorney, the Department has lived up to my expectations
and more, providing me with many opportunities to make a meaningful
difference in people’s lives. The work of the Civil Rights
Division is challenging, demanding, and greatly rewarding. I
began a day before the 9/11 attacks and the support from my peers
and supervisors was evident from the moment I entered on duty.
As a group of us evacuated the downtown area in my supervisor’s
car, we wondered about the uncertainties that lay ahead. We knew
the challenges facing our country had multiplied, but we also recognized
that countless individuals who were voiceless and in need continued
to depend on our enforcement efforts. Rather than return to Los
Angeles to be closer to my family, my resolve to remain in D.C.
and fulfill our mission only grew stronger.

Although I was given significant responsibility early on, I had
the fortune of working with outstanding experienced attorneys.
Each had different styles and strengths, but all were equally effective.
As a new attorney, it was important to be able to develop my skills
and know that my supervisors and colleagues supported my professional
growth. I was assigned a formal mentor who helped me navigate the
vagaries of government service and my Section’s management
was accessible for guidance and advice. The impact of this support
early in my career and the contributions I’ve been able to
make have been critical factors in my decision to remain in the
Department and a reminder of my own responsibilities to foster
the same enthusiasm and growth in newer attorneys who are dedicated
to public service.