Members

Commissioner Biographies

Co-Chairs:

James M. Cole

Willie May, Ph.D

Vice-Chairs:

Nelson Santos

John Butler, Ph.D.

Commission Staff:

Brette Steele

Robin Jones

Commission Members:

Suzanne Bell, Ph.D.

Frederick Bieber, Ph.D.

Thomas Cech, Ph.D.

Cecelia Crouse, Ph.D.

Gregory Czarnopys

M. Bonner Denton, Ph.D.

Vincent Di Maio, M.D.

Troy Duster, Ph.D.

Jules Epstein

Stephen Fienberg, Ph.D.

Andrea Ferreira-Gonzalez, Ph.D.

John Fudenberg

S. James Gates, Jr., Ph.D.

Dean Gialamas

Paul Giannelli

Hon. Barbara Hervey

Susan Howley

Ted Hunt

Linda Jackson

John Kacavas

Pamela King

Marc LeBeau, Ph.D.

Julia Leighton

Hon. Bridget Mary McCormack

Peter Neufeld

Phil Pulaski

Matthew Redle

Michael “Jeff” Salyards, Ph.D.

Ryant Washington

Ex-Officio Members:

Hon. Jed Rakoff

David Honey, Ph.D.

Marilyn Huestis, Ph.D.

Gerald LaPorte

Patricia Manzolillo

Frances Schrotter

Kathryn Turman

Mark Weiss, Ph.D.

Co-Chairs:
James M. Cole
James Cole was sworn in as the Deputy Attorney General on Monday, January 3, 2011. Mr. Cole first joined the Department in 1979 as part of Attorney General’s Honors Program and served for 13 years - first as a trial attorney in the Criminal Division, and later as the Deputy Chief of the Division's Public Integrity Section, the office that handles investigation and prosecution of corruption cases against officials, and employees at all levels of government.   He entered private practice in 1992 and was a partner at Bryan Cave LLP from 1995 to 2010, specializing in white collar defense. He served as a court-appointed independent monitor to a large insurance company to establish and oversee corporate compliance programs and ensure it adhered to laws and regulations. He also counseled businesses on securities, regulatory, and criminal law issues. While in private practice in 1995, Mr. Cole was tapped to serve as Special Counsel to the House Ethics Committee. In that role, he led an investigation into allegations that former House Speaker Newt Gingrich had improperly used tax-exempt money for partisan purposes and misled the Committee in its inquiry. His investigation led to a bipartisan resolution that was approved by an overwhelming majority of the full House, and resulted in a formal reprimand of Speaker Gingrich and a requirement that he pay penalties. Mr. Cole has been a member of the adjunct faculty at Georgetown University Law Center, teaching courses on public corruption law and legal ethics, and has lectured at Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government. He is a former chair of the American Bar Association (ABA) White Collar Crime Committee and served as the Chair Elect of the ABA Criminal Justice Section. He received his B.A. from the University of Colorado and his J.D. from the University of California-Hastings.

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Willie May, Ph.D.
Dr. Willie E. May is currently serving as the Acting Director of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). He also serves as Acting Under Secretary of Commerce for Standards and Technology, a new position created in the America COMPETES Reauthorization Act of 2010. Prior to this assignment, Dr. May served as Associate Director for Laboratory Programs, where he was responsible for oversight and direction of NIST’s seven laboratory programs and served as the principal deputy to the NIST Director. As Acting NIST Director, Dr. May provides high-level oversight and direction for NIST. The agency promotes U.S. innovation and industrial competitiveness by advancing measurement science, standards, and technology. NIST’s FY 2014 resources total $850.0 million indirect appropriations, an estimated $47.3 million in service fees, and $107.0 million from other agencies. The agency employs about 3,000 scientists, engineers, technicians, support staff, and administrative personnel at two main locations in Gaithersburg, Md., and Boulder, Colo. NIST also hosts about 2,700 associates from academia, industry, and other government agencies, who collaborate with NIST staff and access user facilities. In addition, NIST partners with more than 1,300 manufacturing specialists and staff at more than 400 MEP service locations around the country. Dr. May has several leadership responsibilities in addition to those at NIST. He is Vice President of the 18-person International Committee on Weights and Measures (CIPM), President of the CIPM's Consultative Committee on Metrology in Chemistry and Biology; Executive Board Member for the Joint Committee on Traceability in Laboratory Medicine; Board of Visitors for the University of Maryland College Park’s College of Computer, Mathematical, and Natural Sciences.

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Vice-Chairs:
Nelson Santos
Mr. Santos has worked for the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) for over 26 years.  He began his career as a Forensic Chemist in Miami, Florida and has held supervisory/managerial positions in Miami, Chicago and Washington, DC. In 2006, Mr. Santos was promoted to the Senior Executive Service, where he is responsible for directing the operations of eight regional laboratories, six sub-regional laboratories and one research laboratory.  In 2010, he moved into his current position as the Deputy Assistant Administrator for the Office of Forensic Sciences. In this capacity, he leads the largest de-centralized forensic science laboratory system in the federal government consisting of over 550 scientific, technical, and administrative personnel. Mr. Santos has lead significant efforts to enhance DEA laboratory system operations to include achieving ISO accreditation of all DEA laboratories; implementing a system-wide  integrated laboratory information management system (LIMS); developing and implementing DEA’s first centralized training program for forensic chemist; enhancing the quality assurance program’s oversight role in laboratory operations; reorganizing drug research activities and functions; streamlining and automating the delivery of digital evidence analyses results and reorganizing the latent print program to provide for increased technical oversight.  Throughout his career Mr. Santos has been active in the national and international forensic science community holding several key leadership positions in prominent organizations.  From 2010-2013, Mr. Santos served as the Chair of Interpol’s Forensic Science Symposium Committee where he was responsible organizing Interpol’s triennial forensics conference serving forensic science managers. He was the DEA member-representative to the White House Subcommittee of Forensic Science and served for five years as Chair of the Scientific Working Group for the Analysis of Seized Drugs (SWGDRUG).  Mr. Santos Chaired the Council of Federal Forensic Laboratory Directors (CFFLD) for three years, and from 2004-2006 he served on the Board of the American Society of Crime Laboratory Directors (ASCLD).  He remains an active member of ASCLD, American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM), the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) Forensics Committee and Interpol’s Forensic Science Managers Organizing Committee.   Mr. Santos holds a Bachelor of Arts in Chemistry from Florida International University and a Master in Public Administration from George Mason University.

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John Butler, Ph.D.
Dr. Butler has authored 150 scientific articles and invited book chapters. In 2011, ScienceWatch named him the #1 worldwide high-impact author in legal medicine and forensic science for the previous decade based on citations to his work. He has served as an invited guest to the FBI’s Scientific Working Group on DNA Analysis Methods (SWGDAM) for 14 years and currently chairs the Autosomal STR Interpretation Committee. As a member of the World Trade Center Kinship and Data Analysis Panel (2002-2005), he aided the New York City Office of Chief Medical Examiner in their work to identify the remains of victims of the 9/11 terrorist attacks. He also served for four years (2009-2013) on the Virginia Department of Forensic Sciences Science Advisory Committee. He is a member of the American Academy of Forensic Sciences and the International Society for Forensic Genetics and serves an Associate Editor for Forensic Science International: Genetics and on the editorial board for the Journal of Forensic Sciences.His awards include the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (2002), the Department of Commerce Silver Medal (2002) and Gold Medal (2008), the Arthur S. Flemming Award (2007), the Edward Uhler Condon Award (2010), Brigham Young University’s College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences Honored Alumnus (2005), and the Scientific Prize of the International Society for Forensic Genetics (2003).

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Commission Staff:
Brette Steele
Brette Steele serves as Senior Advisor on Forensic Science, Senior Counsel to the Deputy Attorney General, and Designated Federal Official to the National Commission on Forensic Science.  In that capacity, she ensures compliance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act and serves as the Commission’s primary point of contact with the Office of the Deputy Attorney General and the Office of the Attorney General.  Before joining the Office of the Deputy Attorney General, she coordinated the Department of Justice Forensic Science Working Group through the Office of Legal Policy.  Steele graduated with a B.A. from University of California, Berkeley, and a J.D. from UCLA School of Law.  Following law school, she clerked for Judge Dorothy W. Nelson on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit and worked as an associate in the Supreme Court and Appellate Group of Mayer Brown LLP.

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Robin Jones
As Program Manager for the National Commission on Forensic Science, Ms. Jones manages daily operations and provides subject matter expertise to the Commission Chairs and Designated Federal Official.  Ms. Jones has been spearheading and managing forensic science initiatives within the Department of Justice since 1997 when she served as principal staff for Attorney General Janet Reno’s National Commission on the Future of DNA Evidence which received the Attorney General’s Award for Outstanding Contributions to Community Partnerships for Public Safety.  From 2001 to 2009, Ms. Jones worked at the Office of Justice Programs supporting executive-level policy initiatives on forensic science for the Department, including the Department’s response to the 2009 National Academy of Science report on forensic science; briefing material for Congress on the Department’s forensic science programs and initiatives; and management of national symposia and conferences on forensic science.  Notably, she was integral to the development of the President’s five billion-dollar DNA Initiative, “Advancing Justice Through DNA Technology,” an effort that received the Service to America Medal for Justice and Law Enforcement (9/07), the Attorney General’s Initiative on DNA Laboratory Backlogs, and the National Institute of Justice’s Postconviction DNA Testing Assistance program.  Ms. Jones also assisted in the coordination of the Department’s response to the 9/11 tragedy, including working with the National Human Genome Research Institute and the New York City Police Department to develop How DNA Can Help Identify Individuals, a resourcefor families of victims of the attacks.  From 2009 - 2012 Ms. Jones served as Executive Secretary for the National Science and Technology Council’s Subcommittee on Forensic Science, an effort administered through the Office of Science and Technology Policy, Executive Office of the President. Prior to coming to the Department, Ms. Jones was a Legislative Assistant for the Chairman of the Florida Congressional Delegation and Chairman of the Ways and Means Committee, Representative E. Clay Shaw, Jr.  Ms. Jones received her Bachelor of Science degree from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University.

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Commission Members:
Suzanne Bell, Ph.D.
Dr. Bell is originally from Los Alamos, New Mexico.  She obtained a BS degree in 1981 from Northern Arizona University with a dual major in chemistry and police science (criminal justice) and an MS in Forensic Science from the University of New Haven in 1983.  She worked at the New Mexico State Police Forensic Laboratory from 1983-1985 and for the Los Alamos National Laboratory from 1985-1992.  She obtained a PhD in Chemistry from New Mexico State University in 1991 and returned there to complete a post-doctoral appointment.  She joined the Chemistry Department at Eastern Washington University in 1994.  She worked with the Washington State Patrol to establish a BS option in the chemistry department in forensic chemistry.  In 2003, she moved to a research position and joined the faculty of West Virginia University in the Chemistry Department, Analytical Division where she assists both the department and the Forensic and Investigative Sciences (FIS) in the forensic chemistry track.  She oversees MS students from FIS program as well as her chemistry PhD students. To date, she has mentored nine graduating PhD students.  She was tenured in 2011 and is now an Associate Professor with research interests in gunshot residue, forensic toxicology, ion mobility spectrometry, and chemical data analysis. Dr. Bell is active in international forensic science education and training, having traveled to China, Portugal, and Brazil to present workshops and teach forensic chemistry.  She is a member of the Scientific Working Group for Seized Drug Analysis (SWGDRUG) as well as the American Academy of Forensic Sciences (AAFS) and the American Chemical Society (ACS).  She has written several text and reference books including Forensic Chemistry, the Oxford Dictionary of Forensic Science, and the 4th Edition of An Introduction to Forensic Science (editor). 

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Frederick Bieber, Ph.D.
Dr. Frederick R. Bieber is a Medical Geneticist at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Associate Professor of Pathology at Harvard Medical School.  His work focuses on the forensic aspects of DNA-based human identification.  He has testified as an expert witness in state, federal, and military courts.  As an officer in the United States Army Reserve he served at the U.S. Army Criminal Investigation Laboratory (USACIL) and the Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory (AFDIL).  Professor Bieber served on the World Trade Center Kinship and Data Analysis Panel (KADAP), working with the NYC Office of the Chief Medical Examiner in the DNA-based identification of victims of the September 11th attack on the twin towers, and as a member of the Hurricane Victim DNA Identification Expert Group (HVDIEG), assisting the Louisiana State Police in the identification of victims of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita.  Dr. Bieber has served as a member of numerous state and federal forensic advisory boards, including the Scientific Advisory Board of the Virginia Department of Public Safety and the FBI DNA Advisory Board.  He currently serves on the Advisory Committee of the National DNA Databank of Canada, the DNA Subcommittee of the New York State Forensic Commission, and as Chair of the Quality Assurance oversight committee of the United States Army DNA Identification Laboratory (AFDIL).   He served as Senior Advisor in Forensic Science to the Executive Office of Public Safety in Massachusetts, and to the Commissioner of the Connecticut Department of Environmental Services and Public Protection.  For his public and community service Dr. Bieber has received many awards, including Distinguished Service and Public Service Awards from the Massachusetts District Attorney's Association, Massachusetts House of Representatives, Massachusetts State Police, Louisiana State Police, Federal Bureau of Investigation, and the U.S. Department of Justice.

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Thomas Cech, Ph.D.
Dr. Cech was raised and educated in Iowa, earning his B.A. in chemistry from Grinnell College in 1970. He obtained his Ph.D. in chemistry from the University of California, Berkeley, and then engaged in postdoctoral research in the department of biology at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Massachusetts.  In 1978 he joined the faculty of the University of Colorado Boulder, where he became a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator in 1988 and Distinguished Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry in 1990.  In 1982 Dr. Cech and his research group announced that an RNA molecule from Tetrahymena, a single-celled pond organism, cut and rejoined chemical bonds in the complete absence of proteins. Thus RNA was not restricted to being a passive carrier of genetic information, but could have an active role in cellular metabolism. This discovery of self-splicing RNA provided the first exception to the long-held belief that biological reactions are always catalyzed by proteins. In addition, it has been heralded as providing a new, plausible scenario for the origin of life; because RNA can be both an information-carrying molecule and a catalyst, perhaps the first self-reproducing system consisted of RNA alone.  In January 2000, Dr. Cech moved to Maryland as president of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, which is the nation’s largest private biomedical research organization. In addition, HHMI has an $80 million/year grants program that supports science education at all levels (K-12 through medical school) and international research.  In April 2009, Dr. Cech returned to full-time research and teaching at the University of Colorado Boulder, where he also directs the BioFrontiers Institute.  Dr. Cech's work has been recognized by many national and international awards and prizes, including the Heineken Prize of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Sciences (1988), the Albert Lasker Basic Medical Research Award (1988), the Nobel Prize in Chemistry (1989), and the National Medal of Science (1995). In 1987 Dr. Cech was elected to the U.S. National Academy of Sciences and also awarded a lifetime professorship by the American Cancer Society.

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Cecelia Crouse, Ph.D.
Dr. Crouse is currently the Crime Laboratory Director of the ASCLD-LAB ISO-17025 accredited Palm Beach County Sheriff’s Office Crime Laboratory.  She has been with the PBSO laboratory for 21 years including sixteen years as the Manager of the Forensic Biology Unit.  She received a B.S. from Michigan State University and Ph.D. from the University of Miami, Department of Microbiology and Immunology and conducted a Post-doctoral Virology Fellowship in the Department of Ophthalmology of the UM Bascom Palmer Eye Institute.  Prior to graduate school, Dr. Crouse was a Plant Genetics Research Associate with Eli Lilly and Company. Dr. Crouse has authored or co-authored over forty scientific manuscripts and invited book chapters.   Research and forensic validation studies have been presented at over sixty meetings both nationally and internationally.  Dr. Crouse has been a past or present member of the following: Accreditation and Certification Interagency Working Group (IWG) under the National Science and Technology Council Subcommittee (NSTC) on Forensic Science, Florida Association of Crime Laboratory Directors, United States American Prosecutors Research Institute DNA Faculty Member; Attorney General Janet Reno’s Laboratory Funding Group for the National Commission for the Future of DNA Evidence.  Attorney General John Ashcroft’s Attorney General’s Initiative on DNA Laboratory Analysis Backlog. the FBI Scientific Working Group on DNA Analysis, National Institute of Justice DNA Technical Working Group; The National Institute Justice Advisory Board for DNA Expert Systems,  Journal of Forensic Science Editorial Board,  Department of Defense Quality Assurance Oversight Committee for the US Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory, International Commission on Missing Persons Expert Panel Review Quality Assurance Quality Control as well as local and state committees and several law enforcement advisory boards.

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Gregory Czarnopys
Gregory Czarnopys has worked at the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) since 1989 when he began his career as a forensic chemist at the Forensic Science Laboratory - Washington.   As a manager, supervisor and chemist, he has dedicated himself to scientific methods that advance ATF’s ability to solve violent crime and provide unbiased expert testimony in criminal proceeding.  Mr. Czarnopys provided forensic support following the first World Trade Center bombing in 1993; the 1996 explosion of Trans World Airlines Flight 800, which crashed into the Atlantic Ocean in East Moriches, New York, killing 230; the 1995 bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City; the D.C. snipers in 2002, the Atlanta abortion clinic bombings between 1996-1998; Washington, DC serial arson cases and the 9/11 terrorist attacks.  Over the years, Czarnopys has assumed increasing levels of responsibility at ATF as a supervisor and manager. In 2001, he was named chief, Arson and Explosives Section, FSL-W; in 2007, he was named chief, FSL-W, and in 2007, he became the deputy director, ATF Laboratory Services.  As a leader in the forensic science community, Czarnopys has directed numerous projects, task forces and programs that have advanced scientific disciplines around the world.  As a National Response Team (NRT) chemist, from 1991-2000, he led research that addressed ATF concerns regarding contamination at the scene of explosions related to clothing worn on the scene, training and remediation of explosives.  The completion of his study resulted in the establishment of ATF protocols and procedures regarding the processing of explosive materials both on the scene and in the laboratory.  Other scientific projects shepherded by Czarnopys during the last 15 years include disciplines such as DNA, trace evidence, tobacco analysis, fire research and the NIBIN program all of which are at the forefront of ATF’s efforts to solve violent crime and protect the public.  He recently oversaw the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) -17025 accreditation of all four ATF laboratories.  As a result of his efforts, ATF is a leader within the forensic science community and is a sought after partner in field.   Czarnopys received a bachelor of sciences degree in criminalistics from Michigan State University (1988) and has attended ATF supervisory and managerial training classes since 2001.  In 2007, he attended a two-week leadership training program presented by the prestigious Center for Creative Leadership.  In addition, he completed the formal segment of the ATF Leadership Development Program and the Treasury Executive Institute/Executive Forum.  Mr. Czarnopys is an expert guest speaker and an active participant in scientific forums such as the American Society of Crime Laboratory Directors (ASCLD), past member of the Subcommittee on Forensic Sciences and is the current chair of the Council of Federal Forensic Laboratory Directors.

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M. Bonner Denton, Ph.D.
M. Bonner Denton received his Bachelor of Science-Chemistry and Bachelor of Arts-Psychology degrees in 1967 from Lamar State College of Technology and his Ph.D. - Chemistry in 1972 from the University of Illinois.  Today Denton is a Galileo Professor of Chemistry and Professor of Geological Sciences at the University of Arizona.  Research interests include analytical instrumentation, optical spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, separation science, and scientific imaging.  Over the years Denton and his group have developed methodologies that are today widely used in the field of forensic science.  He pioneered the development of high resolution array detector technology for both ultra-sensitive spectroscopic analysis and microscopic imaging.  The high performance achievable in modern Raman, Fluorescence and Atomic Emission Spectroscopies, is directly traceable to contributions made by Denton and his research group.  Currently Denton is applying new advanced detector innovations leading to the development of ultra-trace level explosives detection instrumentation capable of detecting small quantities of explosives at over forty meters standoff distances.  Denton is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry; Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science; Fellow of the Society for Applied Spectroscopy; and Fellow of the American Chemical Society.  He has published over 200 peer reviewed publications and holds 15 patents in the field of chemical instrumentation.

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Vincent Di Maio, M.D.
Dr. Di Maio obtained his Medical Degree from the State University of New York, Downstate Medical Center, in 1965.  He did a year internship in Pathology at Duke University Hospital, Durham, N.C., followed by three years of residency in Pathology at the Downstate-Kings County Medical Center in Brooklyn, New York.  This was followed by a one year fellowship in Forensic Pathology at the Maryland Medical Examiner’s Office.  He was then Board Certified in Anatomical, Clinical and Forensic Pathology.  From July 1, 1970 - June 30, 1972, he was a Major in the Army Medical Corps assigned to the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology in Washington, D.C. where he was Chief of the Legal Medicine Section and Chief of the Wound Ballistic Section.  Dr. Di Maio was a Medical Examiner in Dallas, TX, from July 1, 1972 - February 28, 1981.  He served as Chief Medical Examiner in Bexar County, Texas, (San Antonio), from March l, 1981, until his retirement on December 31, 2006.  He was Director of Bexar County Criminal Investigation Laboratory from March 1, 1981 - April 15, 1997. He was a Professor in the Department of Pathology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, from February 1, 1987, to December 31, 2006.  Dr. Di Maio is Presiding Officer of the Texas Forensic Science Commission and is Editor-in-Chief of the American Journal of Forensic Medicine and Pathology.  He is the author/co-author of four texts:  Excited Delirium Syndrome; Forensic Pathology; Gunshot Wounds and Handbook of Forensic Pathology.  In addition, he is the author/co-author of 88 scientific articles, 14 scientific letters and 15 book chapters.

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Troy Duster, Ph.D.
Troy Duster is Senior Fellow at the Warren Institute on Law and Social Policy and Chancellor’s Professor at the University of California, Berkeley.  He is the past-president of the American Sociological Association, former member of the Social Science Research Council, and he served as chair of the Board of Directors of the Association of American Colleges and Universities.  Relevant publications include, The Legislation of Morality: Law, Drugs, and Moral Judgment (Free Press) and Backdoor to Eugenics (Routledge) - and he is co-author of Unlocking America: Why and How to Reduce America’s Prison Population, with J. Austin, et al., Washington, DC: The JFA Institute.  From 1996-98, he was member and then chair of the joint NIH/DOE advisory committee on Ethical, Legal and Social Issues in the Human Genome Project.  He is also Emeritus Silver Professor of Sociology and former Director of the Institute for the History of the Production of Knowledge at New York University.

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Jules Epstein
Jules Epstein is Professor of Law at Widener University School of Law, where he teaches Evidence, Criminal Procedure and Criminal Law, and Director of the school’s Taishoff Advocacy, Technology and Public Service Institute.  He has published extensively regarding  the death penalty, eyewitness identification and evidence, and is faculty for the National Judicial College, teaching Evidence and Capital Case courses. In the area of forensics, Professor Epstein has worked on two DNA workgroups and in capital case trainings for NIJ, and on a working group on latent print issues for the National Institute for Standards and Technology that led to publication of LATENT PRINT EXAMINATION AND HUMAN FACTORS: IMPROVING THE PRACTICE THROUGH A SYSTEMS APPROACH ((NIST Interagency Report 7842, 2012)  He is co-editor of  THE SCIENTIFIC EVIDENCE REVIEW (ABA, 2013) and THE FUTURE OF EVIDENCE (ABA, 2011) and served as section editor for the ENCYCLOPEDIA OF FORENSIC SCIENCES, 2nd Edition.  Professor Epstein has lectured on forensics to judges and attorneys.

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Stephen Fienberg, Ph.D.
Stephen E. Fienberg is Maurice Falk University Professor of Statistics and Social Science at Carnegie Mellon University, and co-director of the Living Analytics Research Centre (jointly operated by Carnegie Mellon and Singapore Management University), with appointments in the Department of Statistics, the Machine Learning Department, the Heinz College, Cylab, and the Human Rights Science Center.  He served as Dean of the College of Humanities and Social Sciences and taught at the University of Chicago, the University of Minnesota, and York University, where he served as Vice President Academic.  He has been Vice President of the American Statistical Association and President of the Institute of Mathematical Statistics and the International Society for Bayesian Analysis.  His research includes the development of statistical methods, especially tools for the analysis of categorical data, networks, and privacy protection, from both likelihood and Bayesian perspectives.  He is the author or editor of over 25 books and 500 papers and related publications and is a member of the U. S. National Academy of Sciences, and a fellow of the Royal Society of Canada, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the American Academy of Political and Social Science.  In the late 1970s, he led the effort to create the American Statistical Association's Committee on Law and Justice Statistics and served as its first chair. He has been a co-organizer of the triennial International Conference on Forensic Statistics, and was the lead organizer of the 2005 NAS Sackler Colloquium on Forensic Science: The Nexus of Science and the Law, and subsequently served as co-chair, with former Attorney General Janet Reno and the Honorable Judge William Webster, of the American Judicature Society's Commission on Forensic Science and Public Policy, whose goals included “the independent consideration and adoption of forensic science standards, guidelines and best practices when appropriate."

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Andrea Ferreira-Gonzalez, Ph.D.
Andrea Ferreira-Gonzalez, Ph.D. is currently Professor and Chair of the Division of Molecular Diagnostics in the Department of Pathology at Virginia Commonwealth University. She is also the Director of the Molecular Diagnostics Laboratory at Virginia Commonwealth University Health System.  She is an expert in molecular diagnostics in the area of genetics, oncology, coagulation and infectious diseases.  She has been recognized both nationally and internationally for her work in the field of molecular diagnostics. Her publication record demonstrates over 80 publications in peer-reviewed literature and she has been sought after to contribute eight chapters to books in clinical molecular analysis. Dr Ferreira-Gonzalez is a consultant on the Clinical Genetics Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee, Center for Devices and Radiological Health for the Food Drug Administration.  She served as a member of the Secretary of HHS Advisory Committee on Genetics, Health and Society (SACGHS) and the Chair of the SACGHS Task Force on Genetic Testing Oversight.  In addition, she served on the Secretary of HHS Personalized Healthcare Workgroup. She also served as member of Clinical Laboratory Improvement Advisory Committee (CLIAC) to HHS. She has been involved in the development of clinical guidelines with the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute.  Dr Ferreira-Gonzalez also served as President and Chair of the Professional Relations Committee for the Association for Molecular Pathology.  She is currently the chair of the LDT Working group for AMP Professional Relations Committee.

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John Fudenberg
John Fudenberg is the Assistant Coroner for The Clark County Office of the Coroner/Medical Examiner (CCOCME) in Las Vegas, NV.  The Assistant Coroner position in the second in command of the office, there are over 15,000 deaths annually in Clark County.  CCOCME is the only Coroner’s Office accredited by both the International Association of Coroner’s and Medical Examiners (IAC&ME) and the National Association of Medical Examiners (NAME).  John has been employed with the CCOCME for 10+ years and has 16+ years of law enforcement experience from Minnesota and Las Vegas.  John is the President or the International Association of Coroner’s and Medical Examiners (IAC&ME) and serves as the Chair of the Scientific Working Group on Medicolegal Investigations (SWGMDI).

S. James Gates, Jr., Ph.D.
Sylvester James (Jim) Gates, Jr., a theoretical physicist known for his work on supersymmetry, supergravity, and superstring theory at the frontiers of his field, received B.S. (mathematics & physics) degrees in 1973 and a Ph.D. (physics) in 1977 all from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.  His thesis was the first at MIT on supersymmetry, a topic that has dominated fundamental theoretical physics since.  He is currently University System of Maryland Regents Professor, the Toll Professor of Physics, and Center for Particle and Theory Director.  He serves
on the U.S. President's Council of Advisors on Science & Technology (PCAST), and the Maryland State Board of Education.  His scientific work, together with that on STEM (science, technology, engineering, & mathematics) education policy, lead to engagements with the public and policy makers around the globe on the topics of science, STEM education and policy, and diversity.  Since 1972 he has taught as a college-level instructor (mathematics/Physics) at the Univ. of Maryland, M.I.T., Caltech, Howard Univ., and Gustavus Adolphus College.  He has been recognized as the recipient of College Science Teacher of the Year (Washington Academy of Sciences-1999), and the Klopsteg Award (American Association of Physics Teachers -2005).  Since 1996, with ‘‘Breakthrough: The Changing Face of Science in America,’’ he appeared in seven documentaries with an eighth (‘‘Mystery of Matter: A Search for the Elements’’) scheduled for broadcast in 2014.  This led to recognition with the Public Understanding of Science and Technology Award (AAAS-2006).  His presence on the web is such that over one million hits have been recorded on websites affiliated with his activities.  Prof. Gates is the recipient of the 2011 Medal of Science, the 2013 Mendel Medal, and a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the American Philosophical Society, the American Academy of Arts & Science, the American Physical Society, the National Society of Black Physicists, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science, being a Fellow of the last three organizations and the Stellenbosch Institute for Advanced Study in South Africa.   His election to the NAS makes him the first African-American physicist so recognized in its 150 year-long history.

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Dean Gialamas
Dean Gialamas is the Director of the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department Scientific Services Bureau, an ASCLD/LAB-International / ISO 17025 accredited laboratory that operates from ten facilities within Los Angeles County and employs over three hundred technical and support personnel (sworn and civilian) who serve a population six million residents and over one hundred local, state and federal agencies.  Over his 24-year career, he has worked in both public and private forensic laboratories.  He is an active member of several professional organizations and has been appointed to several state and federal task forces and workgroups regarding forensic science issues.  He serves on the editorial board of the Forensic Science Policy & Management Journal, served on a White House Subcommittee on Forensic Science Interagency Working Group, is a Past-President of the American Society of Crime Laboratory Directors, and President-Elect for the Califonia Association of Crime Laboratory Directors.  Dean also served as an instructor for several criminal justice agencies and universities, and he currently consults on forensic science management and leadership principles and issues.  Dean holds dual majors in Chemistry and Biology from UC Irvine and a Master’s degree in Criminalistics from Cal State Los Angeles.  He is professionally certified in forensic science by the American Board of Criminalistics and is a proud graduate of the West Point Leadership & Command Program.

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Paul Giannelli
Paul C. Giannelli is a Distinguished University Professor and the Albert J. Weatherhead III & Richard W. Weatherhead Professor of Law at Case Western Reserve University.  He received his J.D. degree from the University of  Virginia, where he served as Articles Editor of the Virginia Law Review.  His other degrees include an LL.M. from the University of  Virginia, an M.S. in Forensic Science from George Washington University, and a B.A. summa cum laude from Providence College.  After law school, he served as both a prosecutor and defense counsel in the military.  Professor Giannelli has written extensively in the field of evidence and criminal procedure, especially on the topic of scientific evidence.  He has authored or co-authored twelve books, including Scientific Evidence (5th ed. 2012), and has written over 200 articles, book chapters, reports, book reviews, and columns, including articles in the Columbia, Virginia, Cornell, Vanderbilt, Illinois, Fordham, North Carolina, Wisconsin, Ohio State, and Hastings law reviews.  Other articles have been published in specialty journals at Northwestern, Georgetown, Texas, and N.Y.U.  In addition, his work has appeared in interdisciplinary journals, such as the Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics, Issues in Science and Technology (National Academies), International Journal of Clinical & Experimental Hypnosis, and the Journal of Forensic Sciences.  He is also co-author of a chapter on forensic science in Federal Judicial Center/National Academy of Sciences, Reference Manual on Scientific Evidence (3d ed. 2011).  Professor Giannelli’s work has been cited in nearly 700 judicial opinions throughout this country (including seven decisions of the U.S. Supreme Court), as well as in foreign courts.  In addition, he has testified before the U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee and served as:  Reporter for the American Bar Association Criminal Justice Standards on DNA Evidence; co-chair of the ABA Ad Hoc Committee on Innocence; and a member, National Academy of Sciences, Bullet Lead Elemental Composition Comparison Committee. 

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Hon. Barbara Hervey
Judge Barbara Hervey began her career in private practice before joining the Bexar County District Attorney’s Office where she worked for over 16 years prosecuting and training office personnel. She later became a judge at the Texas Court of Criminal Appeals—the supreme court for criminal matters in Texas—in November of 2000.  During her time at the Court, Judge Hervey helped to establish the Texas Criminal Justice Integrity Unit, which identifies areas of the criminal-justice system that can be strengthened. She also serves as the chair of the Court of Criminal Appeals’ Grants Committee, which awards approximately $18 million per biennium to educate actors in the Texas criminal-justice system, including topics highlighted by the Unit.  Judge Hervey was a member of the Timothy Cole Advisory Panel on Wrongful Convictions, and she is an Adviser on the American Law Institute’s panel to rewrite the Model Penal Code: Sexual Assault and Related Offenses. She also serves as a member of the Rules Committee of the Texas Court of Criminal Appeals and is a life fellow at the Texas State Bar Foundation.  Previously, she served on the Governor’s Ad Hoc Committee to Rewrite the Texas Code of Criminal Procedure, was a faculty member of the National College of District Attorneys, was honored as a distinguished alumna, and was awarded the Rosewood Gavel Award for Outstanding Judicial Service.  Judge Hervey has been has been an author of and speaker of over 250 lectures, including at the National Academy of Sciences and the White House Subcommittee on Forensic Science. She also participated in a wrongful-conviction study conducted by the International Association of Police Chiefs in 2013.  Judge Hervey and her husband Richard Langlois live in San Antonio, Texas and have three children: Edward, Christopher, and Melissa, and two grandchildren.

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Susan Howley
Susan Smith Howley has worked with the National Center for Victims of Crime since 1991, serving as its Director of Public Policy since 1999. From 2002 through 2005, she also served as the Center’s Director of Victim Services.  During that time, she has worked to promote the rights and interests of crime victims, advocating for laws and policies that help victims pursue justice and recover from crime.  She has also led major projects to improve the national response to victims, including co-leading Vision 21: Building Capacity, a project to examine the challenges and solutions to building the capacity of crime victim service providers, and directing a project to develop recommendations to bridge the gap between research and practice in victim services. She also oversees the National Center’s work to promote victim-centered policies and practices in the processing of backlogged sexual assault forensic evidence. Ms. Howley has served on the National Advisory Committee on Violence Against Women, the Victims Advisory Group to the U.S. Sentencing Commission, and the Sexual Assault Advisory Committee for the Peace Corps. She was the 2011 winner of the Congressional Victims’ Rights Caucus’ Lois Haight Award for Excellence and Innovation. She received a J.D. in 1987 from Georgetown University Law Center.

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Ted Hunt
Ted Hunt is Chief Trial Attorney at the Jackson County Prosecutor’s Office in Kansas City, Missouri. He has been a prosecuting attorney for over 22 years. In that time, he has prosecuted more than 100 felony jury trials, the vast majority of which have involved the presentation of forensic evidence. He is a teaching faculty member for a number of organizations that train prosecutors, law enforcement, and laboratory analysts on various aspects of the courtroom litigation of forensic evidence. Mr. Hunt is also a member of the Board of Directors for the American Society of Crime Lab Directors Laboratory Accreditation Board (ASCLD/LAB); a member of the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) Forensic Science Committee; and a member of the Missouri Crime Laboratory Review Commission.

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Linda Jackson
Linda Jackson currently serves as Director of the Virginia Department of Forensic Science (VADFS).  VADFS provides scientific analysis of evidential material for all law enforcement agencies, Commonwealth’s attorneys, medical examiners and other agencies in the Commonwealth as prescribed by law; provides expert testimony at trial; maintains a DNA Data Bank; and trains law enforcement personnel on forensic related subjects.  Ms. Jackson has a B.S. degree from Wake Forest University and an M.S. in Chemistry from the University of North Carolina at Charlotte.  She began her career with DFS in 1995 as a Controlled Substances Examiner and then was promoted to Section Supervisor, Controlled Substances Section Chief and Chemistry Program Manager before assuming her current position.  As Chemistry Program Manager, she managed all technical aspects of Controlled Substances, Toxicology and Trace Evidence disciplines.  Ms. Jackson has been a member of the international Scientific Working Group for Seized Drug Analysis (SWGDRUG) since its inception in 1997 and currently serves as Vice Chair.  She is a certified assessor for the ASCLD/LAB-International program since 2004.  She is a member of the American Academy of Forensic Sciences (AAFS), the Mid-Atlantic Association of Forensic Scientists (MAAFS), Clandestine Laboratory Investigating Chemists Association (CLIC), the Virginia Commonwealth University Department of Forensic Science Graduate Academic Committee and served on the federal Interagency Working Group on Standards, Practices and Protocols. 

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John Kacavas
John P. Kacavas was appointed United States Attorney for the District of New Hampshire by President Barack Obama on August 13, 2009.  John is Chairman of the Attorney General=s Advisory Committee (AGAC) Forensic Science Working Group, and he was a member of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy Subcommittee on Forensic Science.  He also serves on the AGAC Subcommittee on Criminal Practice, the Child Exploitation and Obscenity Working Group, and he sits on the New England High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area (HIDTA) Executive Board.  Following his admission to the New Hampshire Bar in 1990, John began his career in public service when he became a homicide prosecutor with the New Hampshire Attorney General=s Office.  From 1993 to 1999, he served as an assistant attorney general, senior assistant attorney general and Chief of the homicide unit.  John then joined the U.S. Department of Justice as a trial attorney in the Criminal Division in Washington, D.C. from 1999 to 2000.  Before becoming U.S. Attorney, John spent the previous nine years in private criminal defense practice, having founded the firm of Kacavas Ramsdell & Howard in Manchester.  John graduated with a B.A. in political science from St. Michael’s College, an M.A. in international affairs from the American University School of International Service in Washington, D.C., and a J.D. from Boston College Law School.

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Pamela King
Pam King works full-time as an attorney for the Office of the Public Defender for the State of Minnesota.  She is a member of the Trial Team. In this role, Ms. King's caseload consists of cases involving complex litigation and/or  forensic science. She also consults with public defenders on a variety of issues including forensic DNA, forensic pathology, toxicology and drug chemistry. In 2011 she was named one of Minnesota Lawyers' Attorneys of the Year for her role as part of the defense team in Minnesota's source code litigation. She has been a participant and is now the leader of the Minnesota State Public Defender DNA Institute, working with a small group of lawyers to become proficient in forensic DNA testing and interpretation. She presents and teaches regularly in Minnesota and nationally on forensic science issues as well as litigation skills. Ms. King is a member of the American Academy of Forensic Sciences, the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers, the National College of DUI Defense Lawyers, the Minnesota Society for Criminal Justice, as well as the Olmsted County and Dodge County Bar Associations. She graduated from William Mitchell College of Law and completed her undergraduate at Drake University. Prior to working for the Minnesota State Public Defender, Ms. King had a private practice representing clients at the trial court level in the areas of criminal and family law. During this time she also held a part-time public defender contract.

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Marc LeBeau, Ph.D.
Marc A. LeBeau, PhD, is the Senior Scientist of the Scientific Analysis Section of the FBI Laboratory. He has worked as a Forensic Chemist and Toxicologist for the FBI since 1994 and has testified as an expert in federal, state, and county courts throughout the United States. From 2000 to 2011, Dr. LeBeau served as the Chemistry Unit Chief for the FBI Laboratory.  Dr. LeBeau holds a Bachelors degree in Chemistry and Criminal Justice from Central Missouri State University (1988) and a Master of Science degree in Forensic Science from the University of New Haven (1990). He was employed in the St. Louis County Medical Examiner’s Office (1990-1994), before beginning his career with the FBI.  In 2005, he received his Doctorate in toxicology from the University of Maryland, Baltimore.  As a Diplomat of the American Board of Forensic Toxicology, Dr. LeBeau is active in numerous scientific organizations.  He is a member and Past-President of the Society of Forensic Toxicologists.  Additionally, Dr. LeBeau serves as the Treasurer of The International Association of Forensic Toxicologists, is a Fellow of the American Academy of Forensic Sciences, and a member of the American Society of Crime Laboratory Directors. Dr. LeBeau has served as the chairman of the Scientific Working Group on the Forensic Analysis of Chemical Terrorism (SWGFACT) and co-chair to the Scientific Working Group on the Forensic Analysis on Chemical, Biological, Radiological, and Nuclear Terrorism (SWGCBRN). He is currently a subcommittee chair of the Scientific Working Group for Forensic Toxicology (SWGTOX).  In 2004, Dr. LeBeau won the FBI Director’s Award for Outstanding Scientific Advancement and in 2008 he was the recipient of the End Violence Against Women (EVAW) International Visionary Award.

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Julia Leighton
Julia Leighton is the general counsel for the Public Defender Service for the District of Columbia (PDS). As general counsel, Ms. Leighton advises the PDS’s Board of Trustees, the PDS management team, and PDS lawyers on a wide variety of legal issues. Ms. Leighton is also a former member of the D.C. Bar Legal Ethics Committee and a current member of the D.C. Rules of Professional Conduct Review Committee. In addition to serving as general counsel, Ms. Leighton is a member of PDS’s Forensic Practice Group and was a 2001 founding member. Prior to becoming PDS’s general counsel, Ms. Leighton spent eleven years litigating criminal cases; eight years as a staff attorney at PDS, and three years as a trial attorney in the Environmental Crimes Section of the U.S. Department of Justice. Ms. Leighton received a B.A. in Economics from Bowdoin College Magna Cum Laude, and her J.D. from the Georgetown University Law Center, Cum Laude.

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Hon. Bridget Mary McCormack
Justice Bridget Mary McCormack joined the Michigan Supreme Court in 2013.  Before her election, she was a law professor and associate dean at the University of Michigan Law School.  Justice McCormack continues to teach there as a Lecturer.  Justice McCormack is a graduate of the New York University Law School.  She spent the first five years of her legal career in New York, first with the Legal Aid Society and then the Office of the Appellate Defender.  In 1996, she became a faculty fellow at the Yale Law School.  In 1998, she joined the University of Michigan Law School faculty and where she taught various clinical courses as well as criminal law and legal ethics.  As the Associate Dean for Clinical Affairs, she substantially grew Michigan’s clinical offerings, founding new clinics focusing on Domestic Violence, Pediatric Health, Mediation, Low Income Taxpayers, International Transactions, Human Trafficking, Juvenile Justice, and Entrepreneurship.  In 2008, she cofounded the Michigan Innocence Clinic, in which she supervised students representing wrongfully convicted Michiganders.  The clinic was the first law school innocence clinic exclusively handling non-DNA cases and exonerated seven people in its first three years. Her clinic innocence work focused, in large part, on forensic science issues. Justice McCormack currently chairs the Supreme Court's Limited English Proficiency Implementation Advisory Committee and participates with a number of professional organizations including the American Bar Association Access to Justice committee, the American Bar Association Working Group on Pro Bono and Public Service, the advisory board of the National Consortium on Racial and Ethnic Fairness in the Courts, the judicial elections committee of the National Association of Women Judges, and serves as a board member of the National Board of Legal Specialty Certification.  In 2013, Justice McCormack was elected to The American Law Institute.

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Peter Neufeld
Peter Neufeld co-founded and co-directs the Innocence Project, an independent non-profit.  The Project currently represents hundreds of inmates across the country seeking post-conviction release through DNA testing.  In its twenty two years of existence, the Innocence Project has been responsible in whole or in part for exonerating more than half of the three hundred and twelve men and women to be cleared through post-conviction DNA testing. The Innocence Project has been transformed from a clinical program with the single focus of exonerating the wrongfully convicted into a leadership role in identifying and addressing the systemic causes of wrongful convictions while at the same time enhancing public safety.  The Project has been instrumental in reforming police practices in eye witness identification, interrogation, and forensic science. In February 2000, Actual Innocence: Five Days to Execution, and Other Dispatches From the Wrongly Convicted, co-authored by Peter, Barry Scheck, and Jim Dwyer was published by Doubleday. The second edition was published by Penguin in 2003. In 2014, Peter collaborated with the New York Hall of Science on the creation and publication of the interactive iBook, False Conviction: Innocence, Guilt & Science authored by Jim Dwyer. In addition to his pro bono responsibilities at the Innocence Project, Peter is a partner in the law firm Neufeld, Scheck & Brustin, specializing in civil rights and constitutional litigation. Since 1995, Peter has served as a member of the New York State Commission on Forensic Science, which regulates all state and local crime laboratories. He is also a trustee of the Montefiore Medical Center and the Albert Einstein College of Medicine. A 1972 graduate of the University of Wisconsin, Peter received his law degree in 1975 from New York University School of Law.

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Phil Pulaski
Chief of Detectives Phil T. Pulaski entered the NYPD in September 1980 and began his career as a Police Officer in the 77th Precinct. Currently, he is Chief of the NYPD’s Detective Bureau that is comprised of approximately 3700 personnel and includes the Police Laboratory, Crime Scene Unit, Latent Print Section, Bomb Squad, Computer Crimes Squad and Forensic Artist Unit. He has 19 years of senior executive experience in forensic science and manages one of the largest forensic science organizations in the United States.  Shortly after September 11, 2001, Chief Pulaski, was designated the Commanding Officer of the NYPD element of the FBI / NYPD Joint Terrorism Task Force where, together with his FBI counterpart, he managed and directed local, national and international terrorism related investigations and intelligence operations, including the 9-11 World Trade Center / Pentagon attacks and October 2001 Anthrax attacks. Chief Pulaski also previously served as the Deputy Commissioner of Operations, and as Commanding Officer of the Intelligence Division, Counter Terrorism Bureau, Detective Borough Manhattan, Detective Borough Bronx, Special Investigations Division, Forensic Investigations Division, Internal Affairs Bureau Group 32 and Arson & Explosion Squad. He has also served as a Managing Attorney in the Legal Bureau, Acting Director of the Police Laboratory and Coordinator of the NYPD’s Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear and Explosives (CBRNE) investigative programs.  Chief Pulaski holds a Juris Doctor from St. John’s University School of Law, Queens NY, and has practiced law for the NYPD for more than 30 years. He also holds a Bachelor’s Degree in Chemical Engineering and a Master’s Degree in Civil Engineering from Manhattan College, Bronx NY. Chief Pulaski worked 4 years as an engineer for the United States Environmental Protection Agency and he also worked as an adjunct assistant professor at John Jay College of Criminal Justice.

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Matthew Redle
“Matt” Redle is the County and Prosecuting Attorney for Sheridan County, Wyoming. He was first elected to that position in 1986. Mr. Redle is a graduate of the Creighton University School of Law. Since 2004, Matt has served on the Permanent Rules Advisory Committee, Criminal Division for the Wyoming Supreme Court. Mr. Redle is a Past Vice-President of the National District Attorneys Association Board of Directors. He is a Vice-Chair and member of the American Bar Association Criminal Justice Section Council. Mr. Redle is a member of the ABA Criminal Justice Standards Committee. Mr. Redle is a member of the Juvenile Prosecutor Leadership Network at the Center for Juvenile Justice Reform, Georgetown Public Policy Institute, Georgetown University. He has spoken on topics relating to science, the law and legal ethics at events sponsored by the American Academy of Forensic Science, the American Bar Association, the National District Attorneys Association, the National Institute of Justice, the National Sexual Violence Resource Center, and the Criminal Justice Section of the Indiana State Bar, among others. On September 9, 2009 Mr. Redle was privileged to testify before the United States Senate Committee on the Judiciary in a hearing entitled “Strengthening Forensic Science in the United States.”

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Michael “Jeff” Salyards, Ph.D.
Dr. Salyards is the Executive Director of the Defense Forensic Science Center. He has served in this position since December 2012. From 2009-2012, he served as the Chief Scientist. Before coming to this position, he was a Principal Analyst with Analytic Services and authored a study about the best methods to train military personnel to collect forensic material during the conduct of military operations. He holds a PhD in Chemistry from Montana State University, a Masters of Forensic Sciences from The George Washington University and has completed a Fellowship in Forensic Medicine from the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology. A former Director of the Defense Computer Forensic Laboratory and AFOSI Special Agent, he has 26 years of combined experience in investigations, forensic consulting and teaching. He served as the Deputy for Operations and Assistant Professor at the Air Force Academy Chemistry Department and was honored with the Outstanding Academy Educator Award. Dr. Salyards has served on the Board of Directors for the American Society of Crime Laboratory Directors/Laboratory Accreditation Board, the Department of Justice National Steering Committee for Regional Computer Forensic Laboratories, the Council of Federal Forensic Laboratory Directors, the ASCLD Board of Directors, and as a Commissioner for the Forensic Education Programs Accreditation Commission. He is a Fellow of the American Academy of Forensic Sciences and has an impressive list of publications and presentations. In January of 2014, he was appointed to the National Commission on Forensic Science. Dr. Salyards is a retired commissioned officer in the United States Air Force. He has been married for 23 years and has three daughters.

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Ryant Washington
Sheriff Ryant L. Washington has served law enforcement since 1990. Prior to his election in 1999, he had served as a Fluvanna County Deputy Sheriff and as a Virginia State Trooper. His educational background consists of a diploma in Business Administration from National Business College; Graduate of Executive Management Training at the National Sheriffs Institute; classes on leadership at the University of Virginia's Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service; and classes in the management of law enforcement agencies at the Southern Police Institute at the University of Louisville. Sheriff Washington's background also includes a variety of leadership positions on local and statewide boards, committees and commissions. He has served as the Virginia Sheriffs Association representative on the Governor's Substance Abuse Service Council; The State Interoperability Committee; Virginia State Police Records Management System study; Foundation of Virginia; Crimes Commission Protective Order Task Force; Supreme Court of Virginia Magistrate study representative; and the Racial Profiling Committee. In 2009 Sheriff Washington was nominated by Senator Mark Warner and Senator Jim Webb to President Barack Obama as a nominee to be appointed as United States Marshal for the Eastern District of Virginia. He is Past President of the Virginia Sheriff’s Association, currently Legislative Chairman of the Virginia Sheriff’s Association, on the Board of Directors for the National Sheriff’s Association representing Virginia Sheriffs, currently serves on the Boards of the Central Virginia Regional Jail Authority, and Piedmont Community College Police Science Advisory Board. He was also appointed by Governor Terry McAuliffe to serve on his administrations transition committee.  In addition, Ryant's community involvement is shown as a former Board of Directors member of the Fluvanna Chamber of Commerce, associate member of the Fluvanna Ruritan Club, member of the National Organization of Black Law Enforcement Officers and a former charter member of the Fluvanna Rotary Club.

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Ex-Officio Members:

Hon. Jed Rakoff
Jed S. Rakoff is a Senior United States District Judge for the Southern District of New York, as well as an Adjunct Professor at Columbia Law School, where he teaches an upperclass seminar on Science and the Courts. .  Prior to taking the bench in 1996, Judge Rakoff was a federal prosecutor (7 years) and a criminal defense lawyer (18 years).  He is currently co-chair of the National Academy of Sciences' Committee on Scientific Approaches to Eyewitness Identification, and he previously served on the National Research Council's Review of the Scientific Approaches Used During the FBI's Investigation of the 2001 Anthrax Letters and on the Federal Judicial Center's Committee on the Development of the Third Edition of the Reference Manual on Scientific Evidence.  From 2007-11, he was on the Governing Board of the MacArthur Foundation Initiative on Law and Neuroscience.  He has a B.A. from Swarthmore College, an M.Phil. from Oxford University, and a J.D. from Harvard Law School.

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David Honey, Ph.D.
Dr. David A. Honey currently serves as the Director, Science and Technology, and as the Assistant Deputy Director of National Intelligence for Science and Technology. In this assignment he is responsible for the development of effective strategies, policies, and programs that lead to the successful integration of science and technology capabilities into operational systems.  Prior to this assignment, Dr. Honey served as the Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense, Research, in the Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Research and Engineering), from 31 August 2009 - 4 November 2011. Before that, Dr. Honey was the Defense Sector General Manager and a Senior Vice President in a small business pursuing innovations in national security. Dr. Honey also served on the Air Force Scientific Advisory Board. He has also served as the Director of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Strategic Technology Office, Director of the Advanced Technology Office, and Deputy Director and Program Manager of the Microsystems Technology Office. Dr. Honey is a retired Air Force Lieutenant Colonel who began his military career as a pilot (B-52D/H and FB-111) and later transitioned into managing a wide variety of technical programs involving intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance.  He received a B.S. in Photographic Science from Rochester Institute of Technology; an M.S. in Optical Science from the University of Arizona; an M.S. in Engineering Physics from the Air Force Institute of Technology (AFIT); and a PhD in Solid State Science from Syracuse University.

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Marilyn Huestis, Ph.D.
Professor Dr. Dr. (h.c.) Marilyn A. Huestis is senior investigator and Chief, Chemistry and Drug Metabolism, IRP, National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health and Adjunct Professor in the Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Maryland. Her research program seeks to discover cannabinoid agonists and antagonists’ mechanisms of action, in utero drug exposure effects, and the neurobiology and pharmacokinetics of designer drugs. She has published 326 peer-reviewed manuscripts. Professor Huestis received a bachelor's degree in biochemistry from Mount Holyoke College, a master's degree in clinical chemistry from the University of New Mexico, and a doctoral degree in toxicology from the University of Maryland. Professor Huestis received a Doctor Honoris Causa from the Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki in Finland in 2010. Other important awards including The International Association of Forensic Toxicologists Alan Curry Award in 2010, the American Association for Clinical Chemistry Outstanding Contributions in a Selected Area of Research Award in 2008, the International Association of Therapeutic Drug Monitoring and Clinical Toxicology Irving Sunshine Award in 2007, the American Academy of Forensic Sciences’ Rolla N. Harger Award in 2005, and the Irving Sunshine Award for Outstanding Research in Forensic Toxicology in 1992. The journal Clinical Chemistry recently featured her as an “Inspiring Mind”. She currently serves on the World Anti-doping Agency’s Prohibited List Committee, the Scientific Working Group on Toxicology (SWG-TOX), Transportation Research Board Committee on Alcohol and Other Drugs, and the National Safety Council’s Alcohol, Drugs and Impairment Division Executive Board. Professor Huestis is past president of the Society of Forensic Toxicologists, past Chair of the Toxicology Section of the American Academy of Forensic Sciences, past president of The International Association of Forensic Toxicologists, and was recently selected as an ex officio member of the National Commission on Forensic Science.

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Gerald LaPorte
Mr. LaPorte serves as the Acting Director in the Office of Investigative and Forensic Sciences at the National Institute of Justice (NIJ), where their mission is to improve the quality and practice of forensic science through innovative solutions that support research, development, technology, evaluation, and information exchange for the criminal justice community.  His primary duties are to manage over $450 million in grant funds and to provide expert analysis and advice on agency-wide programs or issues of national impact relating to forensic science.  Mr. LaPorte received his Bachelor of Science and Business Administration degrees from the University of Windsor (Canada) and Master of Science in Forensic Science from the University of Alabama at Birmingham.  Over the course of his 20 year career, he has worked with the Jefferson County Coroner/Medical Examiner Office (Alabama), a private clinical and forensic toxicology laboratory (Texas), the Anne Arundel County Police Department Crime Laboratory (Maryland), and the Virginia Division of Forensic Sciences.  Prior to joining NIJ, Mr. LaPorte was the Chief Research Forensic Chemist for the United States Secret Service.  Mr. LaPorte has over 15 publications and presented over 80 lectures and workshops.  He is a member of various organizations including the American Academy of Forensic Sciences, Mid-Atlantic Association of Forensic Scientists, American Society of Questioned Document Examiners, and the American Bar Association.  Mr. LaPorte has served on various committees including ASTM, SWGDOC, and co-chair for the Standards Practices and Protocols Interagency Working Group within the Subcommittee on Forensic Science.  Mr. LaPorte received the “MAAFS 2005 Forensic Scientist of the Year” award, as well as numerous commendations, including the “Law Enforcement Public Service Award” from the United States Attorney’s Office Eastern District of Virginia.  He has testified as an expert over 75 times in international, federal, and state courts.

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Patricia Manzolillo
Ms. Manzolillo began her career with USPIS in 1996 in the Memphis Forensic Laboratory as a Forensic Document Examiner.  In 2003 she was promoted to Assistant Laboratory Director in the National Forensic Laboratory in Dulles VA and assumed her current position of Laboratory Director in January 2009.  Ms. Manzolillo is responsible for all forensic services supporting USPIS and USPS investigations.  This includes the 45,000 square foot National Forensic Laboratory, the Digital Evidence Unit’s 18 field locations and 65 forensic and administrative personnel in seven primary and 18 sub-categories of testing.  Ms. Manzolillo received a Bachelor of Arts from the University of Chicago in 1992 and a Master of Science in Forensic Science from the University of Alabama at Birmingham in 1996.  Ms. Manzolillo has co-authored papers in several peer reviewed journals.  She is a member of the American Academy of Forensic Sciences, the American Society of Questioned Document Examiners, the American Society of Crime Laboratory Directors and was chair of the ASTM E30 Committee on Forensic Sciences from 2008 through 2013.  Ms. Manzolillo is certified by the American Board of Forensic Document Examiners. From 2009 to 2012 she represented the USPIS on the OSTP National Science and Technology Council Subcommittee on Forensic Science.  Ms. Manzolillo chaired the Subcommittee’s Interagency Working Group on Accreditation and Certification leading thirty federal, state and local forensic scientists in the development of white papers on accreditation, certification and proficiency testing.  Ms. Manzolillo has led numerous projects in her career including collaboration with a Department of Energy National Laboratory on a project funded by a grant from the US Technical Support Working Group to study the individuality of handwriting.  Ms. Manzolillo also led the USPIS National Forensic Laboratory to successful accreditation by ASCLD-LAB in 2010 achieving a goal that had existed for over 10 years.

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Frances Schrotter
Frances E. Schrotter is senior vice president and chief operating officer at the American National Standards Institute (ANSI). In this position, she has primary responsibility for the Institute’s activities supporting and facilitating the participation of U.S. interests in domestic, regional, and international standardization activities. Ms. Schrotter works closely with government agencies and public-sector stakeholders to explore how the private sector can assist in addressing their standardization needs. In addition, she collaborates with the ANSI constituency and other affected interests to identify the need for new standards and conformance programs and works with these groups to facilitate their timely implementation. Her role encompasses management of the ANSI administrative operations, including membership, communications, education and training services, and human resources, as well as overseeing the Institute’s cross-stakeholder forums for homeland defense and security, nanotechnology, electric vehicles, nuclear energy, energy efficiency, and identity theft protection and identity management.  Since joining ANSI in 1976, Ms. Schrotter has worked with numerous domestic and international committees developing standards in dozens of industries, including the information technology standards arena, where she served as the first international secretariat of the ISO/IEC Joint Technical Committee 1 on Information Technology.  Ms. Schrotter was born and raised in New York City.
ANSI is a not-for-profit membership organization that brings together organizations from both the private and public sectors dedicated to furthering U.S. and international voluntary consensus standards and conformity assessments. ANSI accredits national standards developing organizations and approves American National Standards. It is the sole U.S. representative to the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and, via the U.S. National Committee, the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC). ANSI is also a member of the International Accreditation Forum, the Pacific Area Standards Congress, and the Pan American Standards Commission.

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Kathryn Turman
Kathryn M. Turman is the Assistant Director of the FBI's Office of Victim Assistance in Washington, D.C. She oversees assistance to victims of federal crimes across the FBI, including services to child victims, Native American victims, victims of terrorism, and U.S. citizens who are taken hostage in foreign countries.  Along with Victim Specialists in FBI field offices, the FBI's victim assistance program includes child interview specialists, a forensic pathologist, medical social workers, and rapid response teams of Victim Specialists that have deployed to support victims following mass casualty crimes and disasters on the Red Lake Reservation and at Virginia Tech, Fort Hood, Binghamton, Tucson, Aurora, Newtown, Boston Marathon Bombing, and the Washington Navy Yard.  Ms. Turman served in the Department of Justice from 1991 until 2002, first as Director of the Missing and Exploited Children’s Program, as Chief of the Victim Witness Assistance Unit in the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Columbia, and as Deputy Director then Director of the Office for Victims of Crime.  Before joining the Department of Justice, she was a special assistant to Senator John Heinz and also spent many years working with children who suffered catastrophic illness and injury.  Ms. Turman has worked with thousands of victims of crimes ranging from misdemeanor assaults to international terrorism.  She hired the first forensic child interview specialists in the federal criminal justice system and also authored the first publication for victims explaining the role of DNA evidence in the criminal justice process. Under her leadership the Office for Victims of Crime sponsored innovative programs such as a telemedicine program by which forensic pediatricians located in urban hospitals could examine and consult with local physicians and nurses on child abuse cases in Indian Country and rural communities.  Ms. Turman has served on numerous national task forces, boards, and Federal Advisory Committees, including the National Commission on the Future of DNA Evidence, the U.S. Advisory Board on Child Abuse and Neglect, and the Federal Advisory Committee on Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner/Sexual Assault Response Team, American Indian/Alaska Native Initiative.   Ms. Turman authored a number of professional articles and Department of Justice publications for victims and law enforcement professionals on issues such as reunification of missing children and victim and family management and assistance after terrorism and mass casualty incidents.  For her overall leadership on behalf of victims she received the Edmund J. Randolph Award, the highest award provided by the Department of Justice in 2001.  She was a 2005 recipient of the National Crime Victims Services Award from the Attorney General, the Attorney General’s Award for Distinguished Service, and a National Intelligence Meritorious Unit Citation from the Director of the Central Intelligence Agency for her work on the Pan Am 103/Lockerbie prosecution.  Ms. Turman was a recipient of the Presidential Rank Award for Meritorious Service in 2007. 

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Mark Weiss, Ph.D.
Mark Weiss is Director of the Behavioral and Cognitive Sciences Division at the National Science Foundation.  He received his doctorate in anthropology from the University of California, Berkeley in 1969 after which he became a member of the Anthropology Faculty at Wayne State University.  There, his research focused on application of DNA methodologies to questions of anthropological significance.  He left the university in 2000 for the US National Science Foundation.  Until 2005 Weiss was program director of physical anthropology at NSF when he was seconded to the Office of Science and Technology Policy at the White House where he served as Assistant Director for Social, Behavioral and Economic Sciences. Upon returning to NSF in 2006 he was Senior Science Advisor in the Directorate for Social, Behavioral and Economic Sciences until becoming Division Director the following year.   He has represented NSF on a number of interagency committees including the NSTC’s Human Subjects Research Subcommittee, the Social, Behavioral and Economic Sciences Subcommittee and the Subcommittee on Forensic Sciences (SoFS).  While serving on SoFS, he also co-chaired the Research, Development, Testing and Evaluation Working Group. At NSF he has been instrumental in seeking to improve communication between academic researchers and the forensic science community and to strengthening support of basic science that has downstream applications in forensic science.

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