Celebrating 24 Years of the ADA – Gateway to the Community

July 23, 2014

This post appears courtesy of Eve Hill, Deputy Assistant Attorney General for Civil Rights

TUESDAY:  Gateway to the Community

This week, in honor of the 24th anniversary of the ADA, we recognize and celebrate the different doorways that the ADA is opening up to people with disabilities.  Today, we highlight the ADA as a doorway to the community.

With the enactment of the ADA, Congress provided a clear and comprehensive national mandate to eliminate discrimination against individuals with disabilities.  Consistent with this, the Civil Rights Division works to assure equality of opportunity, full participation, independent living, and economic self-sufficiency for people with all types of disabilities.  In short, we work to provide people with disabilities with meaningful opportunities to live life to their fullest potential.

Over the past year, we have continued our aggressive efforts to enforce the Supreme Court’s decision in Olmstead v. L.C., which recognized that the civil rights of people with disabilities are violated under the ADA when they are unnecessarily segregated from the rest of society.  Under the ADA, states are required to avoid unnecessarily placing persons with disabilities in institutions and to ensure that they receive services in the most integrated setting appropriate to their needs.  In this administration, the division has engaged in Olmstead enforcement activities in approximately 45 matters in 24 states on behalf of children and adults with physical, mental, and developmental disabilities who are in or at risk of entering segregated settings, including state-run and private institutions, nursing homes, board and care homes, and sheltered workshops.  Just last year, we participated in 18 Olmstead matters across the country.  Under statewide settlement agreements we have reached in eight states, over 46,000 people with disabilities across the country will have the opportunity to live and participate in their communities.

One of the most recent examples of our work ensuring community integration of adults with serious mental illness was in New Hampshire where the department finalized an agreement with the state to significantly expand and enhance its capacity to address the needs of over three thousand adults with serious mental illness in integrated community settings.  The agreement requires New Hampshire to create mobile crisis teams and community crisis apartments throughout the state as an alternative to more restrictive settings; to increase Assertive Community Treatment teams; to provide much more supported housing that is scattered throughout the community; and to significantly increase the number of people receiving integrated supported employment services in New Hampshire.

All of the decree requirements will foster the independence of people with serious mental illness and enable them to participate more fully in community life.  The expanded community services will significantly reduce visits to hospital emergency rooms and will avoid unnecessary institutionalization at state mental health facilities, including New Hampshire Hospital (the state’s psychiatric hospital) and the Glencliff Home (the state nursing home for people with mental illness).  Recently, the governor of New Hampshire signed into law a funding bill that will enable the state to implement the terms of the decree.  The new law authorizes approximately $9 million in additional mental health funding through next summer and commits the state to over $64 million in additional mental health funding through state fiscal year 2018.  Click here for more information.

To find out more about DOJ Olmstead enforcement work, visit the Olmstead: Community Integration for Everyone website, and visit our Faces of Olmstead website to read about some of the individuals whose lives have been improved by the Olmstead decision and the department’s Olmstead enforcement efforts.  For more general information on the Americans with Disabilities Act, visit ADA.gov, or call the toll-free ADA Information Line at (800) 514-0301 (voice) or (800) 514-0383 (TTY).