Department of Justice Seal

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

CRM

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 3, 1999

(202)514-2008

WWW.USDOJ.GOV

TDD(202) 514-1888

FEDERAL APPEALS COURT UPHOLDS DEPORTATION

OF FORMER NAZI CONCENTRATION CAMP GUARD


A federal appeals court in Chicago has unanimously affirmed an order directing the deportation of Anton Tittjung, 75, a retired stone worker living in Kewaunee, Wisconsin, the Department of Justice announced. Tittjung served during World War II as an armed Waffen-SS guard at the Nazi-operated Mauthausen and Gross Raming concentration camps. The case against Tittjung was brought by DOJ's Office of Special Investigations (OSI).

Circuit Judge Joel M. Flaum, writing for a three-judge panel of the Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals, held that Tittjung was properly ordered deported in 1994 because, from 1942 through 1945, he participated in the persecution of persons on the basis of their race, religion, national origin, or political opinion as a member of the Nazi SS-Totenkopf Sturmbanne (Death's Head Battalions), units responsible for the operation of the concentration camp system. The court cited captured Nazi documents showing that Tittjung served as a guard at the Mauthausen concentration camp and its subcamp at Gross Raming, in Nazi-annexed Austria.

The court noted that during the period of Tittjung's service, thousands of individuals, including Jews, political prisoners, and civilian forced laborers from nations throughout Europe, were murdered at Mauthausen and Gross Raming by shooting, gassing, hanging, electrocution, starvation, slave labor, lethal injection, and other forms of mistreatment. The decision states that "Tittjung's duties included ensuring that prisoners performed forced labor and did not escape, as well as guarding prisoners on forced marches."

Tittjung was stripped of his U.S. citizenship in December 1990 after a federal judge in Milwaukee ruled that he had lied about his service as a concentration camp guard to gain entry to the United States in 1952 and to obtain citizenship in 1974.

"The ruling is a manifestly just resolution of a clear-cut case," said Eli M. Rosenbaum, director of OSI. "This decision reaffirms that those, like Tittjung, who stood guard at Nazi concentration camps, where innocent civilians were subjected to unspeakable horrors, are not entitled to the privilege of U.S. residence." 63 such persons have now been stripped of U.S. citizenship and 49 have been removed from the United States as a result of cases brought by the Office of Special Investigations since the unit's creation in 1979.

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