Native American Policies

DOJ Sovereignty Policy

The Department of Justice Policy on Indian Sovereignty and Government-to-Government Relations with Indian Tribes reaffirms the Justice Department's recognition of the sovereign status of federally recognized Indian tribes as domestic dependent nations and reaffirms adherence to the principles of government-to-government relations; the Policy also informs Department personnel, other federal agencies, federally recognized Indian tribes, and the public of the Department's working relationships with federally recognized Indian tribes; and guides the Department in its work in the field of Indian affairs ...

Department of Justice Policy on Indian Sovereignty

Tribal Consultation

By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the laws of the United States of America, and in order to establish regular and meaningful consultation and collaboration with tribal officials in the development of Federal policies that have tribal implications, to strengthen the United States government-to-government relationships with Indian tribes, and to reduce the imposition of unfunded mandates upon Indian tribes; it is hereby ordered ...

Executive Order 13175

President Obama's Memorandum on Tribal Consultation

The United States has a unique legal and political relationship with Indian tribal governments, established through and confirmed by the Constitution of the United States, treaties, statutes, executive orders, and judicial decisions. In recognition of that special relationship, pursuant to Executive Order 13175 of November 6, 2000, executive departments and agencies (agencies) are charged with engaging in regular and meaningful consultation and collaboration with tribal officials in the development of Federal policies that have tribal implications, and are responsible for strengthening the government- to-government relationship between the United States and Indian tribes.

President Obama's Memorandum on Tribal Consultation

United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples

On April 20, 2010, United States Permanent Representative to the United Nations Ambassador Susan E. Rice announced at the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues that the United States had decided to review the U.S. position on the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. The United States undertook a formal review process, during which the U.S. Department of State and other Federal agencies engaged in consultations with federally-recognized tribes and dialogues with interest non-governmental organizations and other stakeholders. On December 16, 2010, at the 2010 White House Tribal Nations Conference, President Obama announced that the United States supports the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. The President stated that the aspirations the Declaration affirms, including the respect for the institutions and rich cultures of Native peoples, are aspirations we must all seek to fulfill. The President’s statement was accompanied by a written Announcement of U.S. Support for the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.

United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples

Announcement of U.S. Support for the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples