CTAS Frequently Asked Questions

CTAS Frequently Asked Questions

How to Apply | Post-Award | Purpose Area 1 | Purpose Area 2 | Purpose Area 3 | Purpose Area 4 | Purpose Area 5 | Purpose Area 6 | Purpose Area 7 | Purpose Area 8 | Purpose Area 9 | Purpose Area 10

1. What is the Coordinated Tribal Assistance Solicitation?

The Coordinated Tribal Assistance Solicitation (CTAS) responds to Tribal leaders’ request to improve and simplify the Department of Justice (DOJ) grant-making process. For Fiscal Years (FYs) 2010 and 2011, DOJ combined existing Tribal government-specific competitive solicitations into one solicitation, and required only one application from each Tribe or Tribal Consortium under CTAS. FY 2012 CTAS continues this approach.

2. Is this process different from Fiscal Year (FY) 2011?

DOJ incorporated feedback from Tribal meetings and consultations and has made the following changes to this FY 2012 CTAS:

  • A question and answer template has been incorporated into the solicitation to make the document more user-friendly;
  • Purpose Areas have been adjusted to address the Tribes’ feedback and concerns and allow for greater flexibility in funding requests;
  • The award period has been standardized to three (3) years across all Purpose Areas to allow for comprehensive program implementation.
  • A new strategic planning pilot program has been added.
  • More data on Tribe demographics is requested to gain a better understanding of the unique characteristics of each Tribe.

As in FY 2010 and FY 2011, this FY 2012 solicitation refers to DOJ’s Tribal government-specific competitive grant programs as “Purpose Areas.” Applicants may select the Purpose Area(s) that best address Tribes’ concerns related to public safety, criminal and juvenile justice, and the needs of victims/survivors of domestic violence, sexual assault, and other forms of violence.

In response to a single Tribal or Tribal consortium application requesting funds from multiple Purpose Areas, multiple awards may be made. Purpose Areas may be funded and administered by different DOJ program offices (see Part E “Purpose Areas—Snapshot,” which identifies the DOJ program office that manages each Purpose Area). DOJ anticipates that the grants will be managed by the awarding DOJ program office.

In some cases, Tribes may receive two separate awards under a single Purpose Area application for activities that fall under different funding streams that have been combined for the purpose of the application. Tribes or Tribal consortia receiving grants from multiple funding streams must maintain the grant funds separately and file all required reports for each grant awarded with the applicable DOJ component.

Changes to DOJ grant programs enacted with the passage of the Tribal Law and Order Act (TLOA) continue to be incorporated into this solicitation. For more information regarding the TLOA, please visit www.usdoj.gov/tribal.

This coordinated approach will apply only to requests for grant funding made in response to this solicitation, which is for FY 2012 grant funding, specifically for federally-recognized Tribes and Tribal consortia. Tribes or Tribal consortia may be eligible for and are encouraged to submit separate applications to any additional non-Tribal government-specific DOJ grant programs for which they may be eligible. For information on additional funding sources, please go to http://www.grants.gov and the websites of individual federal agencies.

The DOJ components offering Tribal government-specific grant resources through the ten “Purpose Areas” identified in this Coordinated Tribal Assistance Solicitation are listed below. For more information on each component, please see www.usdoj.gov/tribal.

  • Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS)
  • Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA-OJP)
  • Office for Victims of Crime (OVC-OJP)
  • Office on Violence Against Women (OVW)
  • Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP-OJP)

3. What are the advantages for submitting the application in this manner?

  • Tribal government-specific funding across many DOJ components is available and described at one time, so that Tribes can see many funding opportunities, and based on their specific needs, request funding that is best aligned with such needs.
  • CTAS provides the opportunity for Tribes and Tribal consortia to engage in comprehensive planning, and be strategic in their request for funding. The application process provides the opportunity for Tribes to identify their needs and gaps in services that CTAS can address. In reviewing the application, DOJ will have a better understanding of the Tribal government’s overall public safety and related needs.
  • Only one budget worksheet and narrative form is required.
  • One system for submitting grants electronically is used.
  • One Response Center to call or e-mail for programmatic questions is available.
  • Only one complete and comprehensive application needs to be submitted.
  • Enhanced consistency in the DOJ application peer review system across all DOJ components results.
  • DOJ is better able to make award decisions to address Tribes’ needs on a more comprehensive basis.

4. What are the “Purpose Areas”?

DOJ’s Tribal government-specific competitive grant programs outlined in 2012 CTAS are referred to as “Purpose Areas.” Applicants may apply for funding under the Purpose Area(s) presented below that best address Tribes’ concerns related to public safety, criminal and juvenile justice, and the needs of victims/survivors of domestic violence, sexual assault, and other forms of violence. Below is a snapshot of the Purpose Areas. See detailed information for each Purpose Area in Part G of 2012 CTAS.

  • Public safety and community policing (COPS)
  • Comprehensive Planning Demonstration Program (BJA)
  • Justice Systems and Alcohol and Substance Abuse (BJA)
  • Corrections and Correctional Alternatives (BJA)
  • Tribal Sexual Assault Services Program (OVW)
  • Violence Against Women Tribal Governments Program (OVW)
  • Children’s Justice Act Partnerships for Indian Communities (OVC)
  • Comprehensive Tribal Victim Assistance Program (OVC)
  • Juvenile justice (OJJDP)
  • Tribal youth program (OJJDP)

NOTE: FAQs for each Purpose Area are provided later in this document. Also note that some Purpose Areas have specific eligibility criteria.

5. Does this single application process apply only to federally-recognized Tribal governments?

Yes. In general, only federally-recognized Indian Tribes are eligible to apply. Applicants are limited to federally-recognized Indian tribal governments as determined by the Secretary of the Interior, and Tribal consortia consisting of two or more federally-recognized Indian Tribes. Under the eligibility exception for Purpose Area #6, an organization may apply that is acting as the authorized designee of a federally-recognized Indian Tribe. However, one should also review the general eligibility exception relating to political sub-units at question #28 and the specific eligibility exception for purpose area #6.

6. Does a Tribe or Tribal Consortium have to submit an authorizing resolution?

For FY 2012 CTAS, applicants are asked to submit documentation reflective of their legal authority to apply for grants under CTAS on behalf of their Tribes. Recognizing that Tribes have different forms of tribal governance, no prescribed form of documentation will be required. Rather, for FY 2012 CTAS, an applicant may submit a resolution, a letter, affidavit, or other documentation, as appropriate, that certifies that the applicant has the legal authority to apply for CTAS awards on behalf of the Tribe. This documentation must be current, sufficient to demonstrate authority for the application, contain authorized signature(s), and submitted by the application’s due date. Please see samples of various forms of documentation at www.usdoj.gov/tribal.

Regarding a Tribal consortium application, the applicant must submit documentation of authority as described above from each Tribal consortium member, unless existing consortium bylaws or other tribal governance documents allow action without explicit authorization from the member Tribes in the consortium. In that case, the Tribal consortium must submit a resolution, a letter, affidavit, or other documentation, as appropriate, that certifies that the Tribal consortium has the legal authority to apply for grants under CTAS on behalf of the consortium. This documentation must be current, sufficient to demonstrate authority for the application, contain authorizing signature(s), and submitted by the application’s due date. In addition, a copy of the bylaws or other governance documents that allow the Tribal consortium’s action without support from all consortium members must be included with this documentation.

If the applicant is a Tribal designee under Purpose Area #6, OVW Violence Against Women Tribal Governments Program, the applicant will need a tribal resolution, or equivalent legal enactment, from the tribe as part of the application which should 1) authorize the applicant to submit an application on behalf of the federally-recognized Indian Tribe; and 2) state the Tribe’s support for the project and its commitment to participate in the project if it is selected for funding. This resolution or equivalent legal enactment must be current, sufficient to demonstrate authority for the application, contain authorizing signature(s), and submitted by the application’s due date.

As stated in the “Important Warning” boxes, each Tribe or Tribal consortium will be allowed only one application submission. If a Tribe submits more than one application, only one application will be considered in the review process. A Tribe may apply as part of a consortium and also submit its own independent application in response to the 2012 CTAS, provided that this independent application is submitted for funding for activities that are distinct from those activities for which the Tribal consortium has applied.

7. What am I required to submit in the application?

It is the responsibility of the applicant to ensure that its application is complete and submitted by the deadline. Applications will be removed from consideration prior to peer review if the application:

  • Is submitted after the deadline
  • Does not meet the eligibility criteria
  • Does not include the following:
  • Tribal Community & Justice Profile
  • Purpose Area Narrative for each Purpose Area under which the applicant is applying
  • Budget Detail Worksheet and Narrative

If an application fails to comply with the length-related guidance stated in the solicitation, noncompliance may be considered in peer review and in final award decisions.
Please also see Section K, Application Checklist, located in the Solicitation, for complete list of required attachments.

8. May I apply for more than one Purpose Area?

Yes. You may apply for as many Purpose Areas as needed. As noted above, a Purpose Area narrative is required for each Purpose Area under which you are applying.

9. Are there specific requirements with each Purpose Area?

Yes. Please see Section G of the Solicitation on Purpose Areas-Specific Information.

10. Are applicants required to use the purpose area templates provided as part of the FY 2012 CTAS?

No. Template use is recommended, but it is not required. Templates are provided to assist applicants in writing their applications. They help the applicant address topics relevant to each purpose area. The applicant must address all topics/questions from each purpose area template for which they are requesting funds. If an applicant chooses not to use the provided purpose area template, the applicant should provide the topic/question number along with the proposed answer in their application so that it can be effectively peer reviewed.

11. What programs are not included in the Coordinated Tribal Assistance Solicitation?

  • Office on Violence Against Women Tribal Coalitions Program
  • Training & Technical Assistance Programs
  • New BJA Tribal Civil and Criminal Legal Assistance Grants, Training and Technical Assistance
  • Non-Tribal Government-Specific Competitive Grants (Tribes may compete for non-Tribal government-specific grants separately).

12. How long will the solicitation be open?

The solicitation is open from January 18, 2012 until April 18, 2012. All applications are due by 9:00 p.m. Eastern Time on April 18, 2012. Applications submitted after this deadline date and time will not be considered for funding.

13. What are the amount and length of the awards for each Purpose Area?

All awards will be for three years. See Part E in the Solicitation for a complete list of Purpose Areas and their estimated amount of funding and award amounts.

14. When will my Tribe know if the application is selected for funding?

You will be notified by September 30, 2012 whether or not your application was selected for funding.

15. How do I determine who is the authorized official for the application?

The authorized official is the principal official of the Tribal government or the designated official as determined by the Tribe. Only one authorized official can be named in the application.

16. Where can I find more information about DOJ program offices?

Information about 2012 CTAS can be found at www.usdoj.gov/tribal . You can find additional helpful links to the Office of Justice Programs, the Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA), the Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS Office), the Office on Violence Against Women (OVW), the Office for Victims of Crime (OVC), and the Office of Juvenile and Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) by visiting their web pages.

17. Who do I contact if I need help?

For more information please refer to our Tribal Justice and Safety website: www.usdoj.gov/tribal.

18. Can a consortium apply for funding under a specific Purpose Area and individual Tribes forming that consortium apply for the same and other Purpose Areas?

Yes. A Tribe may apply as part of a consortium and also submit its own independent application in response to the 2012 CTAS, provided that this independent application is submitted for funding for activities that are distinct from those activities for which the Tribal consortium has applied.

19. Can a consortium apply for funding under a specific Purpose Area and the individual Tribes forming that consortium also apply under the same Purpose Area?

Yes. A Tribe may apply as part of a consortium and also submit its own independent application in response to the 2012 CTAS, provided that this independent application is submitted for funding for activities that are distinct from those activities for which the Tribal consortium has applied.

20. For the Tribal Community and Justice Profile section of a consortium application, does the application need to address each member Tribe specifically or should it address the service area of the consortium as a whole?

The Tribal Community and Justice Profile for a consortium application should address the service area of the consortium as a whole.

21. How many performance measures do we need to have for each purpose area?

Please see section E, part IV of 2012 CTAS. You should address all performance measures listed for each Purpose Area for which you are applying.

22. Is there a page limit on the number of “Other Attachments”?

There is a 15-page limit for the Tribal Community and Justice Profile and a 15-page limit for each Purpose Area narrative. There is no page limit for other attachments but there is a size limit. No single attachment may exceed 20 megabytes.

23. If we have a current grant under one of the Purpose Areas are we eligible under that area?

Yes, all federally-recognized Tribes are eligible to apply for all Purpose Areas for Fiscal Year 2012. However, a Tribe with current funds that are not expiring should not seek funding for a project that is already covered by existing funding, but rather should seek funding to expand or enhance existing projects.

24. If we apply for 3 Purpose Areas, is it possible that only 1 or 2 Purpose Areas could get funded? Or is it all or none?

Each Purpose Area will be reviewed individually by the Department of Justice (DOJ) component that manages that Purpose Area. Once all Purpose Area narratives have been reviewed, the DOJ components will come together to discuss their funding recommendations and coordinate in making award decisions to address your needs on a more comprehensive basis. Therefore, it is not “all or none.” Where multiple awards are made, such awards will be managed by the awarding DOJ component in the same manner that grants are currently managed. You must maintain the grant funds separately and file all required reports for each grant awarded with the applicable DOJ component.

25. What happens if a Tribe selects Comprehensive Application on the Executive Summary?

Applicants that identify themselves as comprehensive applicants do not receive anymore or any less consideration then applicants who do not identify themselves as comprehensive applicants. Those applications that are identified as comprehensive are evaluated to determine whether requests for funding across DOJ Purpose Areas are linked.  The DOJ Components make every effort to support the coordinated efforts of the Tribe by coordinating funding decisions.

26. Can a Tribe or a department of a Tribe submit an application OTHER than to the Coordinated Tribal Assistance Solicitation?

Yes! The CTAS is a coordinated solicitation for certain Tribal government-specific grant programs, but the DOJ administers many other grant programs for which Tribes may be one of many eligible entities. Tribes or Tribal consortia may submit applications for any other DOJ grant funding opportunity for which Tribes are eligible. Please visit www.grants.gov on a regular basis for a listing of all funding opportunities.

27. Is the Tribal Law and Order Act incorporated into the CTAS?

Yes. The Tribal Law and Order Act (TLOA) affected different grant programs in different ways. All of these changes were incorporated into the CTAS. For more information on the TLOA, see the www.usdoj.gov/tribal which contains both a PowerPoint with highlights of the Act and a document showing line-by-line changes from the Act.

28. Are Alaska village corporations and regional corporations eligible to apply for the CTAS?

Yes. Both regional and village corporations established pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act are eligible to apply for all Purpose Areas under the CTAS based on the following statutory definition of “Indian Tribe” which applies to all Purpose Areas:

"Indian Tribe" means any Indian Tribe, band, nation, or other organized group or community, including any Alaska Native village or regional or village corporation as defined in or established pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (85 Stat. 688) [43 USC §§ 1601 et seq.], which is recognized as eligible for the special programs and services provided by the United States to Indians because of their status as Indians. [Emphasis added.]

29. Are political sub-units of Indian Tribal governments (e.g., tribally-recognized chapters, or individual reservation(s)) under a larger federally recognized Tribe eligible to apply for funding?

Yes, under very limited circumstances, and only with prior approval obtained from DOJ prior to the application deadline. Procedures and other information related to obtaining such approval are below.

In general, only one application will be accepted from each Tribe or Tribal consortium. If a Tribe or Tribal consortium (including all agencies within that Tribe or Tribal consortium) submits more than one application, only one application will be considered in the review process.

However, in addition to accepting an application from each individual Tribe, DOJ may accept a single application from a political sub-unit of a federally-recognized Indian tribal government after DOJ review and approval of Tribal documentation in support of the political sub-unit’s eligibility to submit a separate application for funding to serve citizens within that political sub-unit.

DOJ will review the eligibility of a political sub-unit to submit an application (separately from the federally-recognized Indian Tribal government that includes such sub-unit, or, the “parent Tribe”) on a case-by-case basis. A political sub-unit of a federally-recognized Indian Tribal government seeking to apply under the FY 2012 CTAS must receive DOJ approval to submit an application prior to the application deadline.

Procedure for submitting a request for eligibility review:

In order to obtain DOJ approval to submit an application, a political sub-unit seeking to apply on its own must submit documentation that demonstrates the political sub-unit’s legal authority to submit its own application (separately from a parent Tribe’s application). The political sub-unit seeking such approval must submit this documentation to the attention of Rhonda Craig, Attorney Advisor, Office of the General Counsel, Office of Justice Programs, by E-mail, fax, or expedited/overnight mail (use of mail service with package tracking capability is strongly encouraged) that must be received by OJP by no later than 9:00 p.m. Eastern Time on March 19, 2012, in order for the political sub-unit’s request to receive DOJ review and consideration.

(Please note: Potential applicants that are political sub-units seeking approval to submit a CTAS application should still observe the April 4, 2012, deadline by which applicants are strongly encouraged to register in GMS in preparation for application submission. See Section G. of the solicitation titled, “How to Apply,” for more details regarding registration.)

Address information for submission of request for eligibility review:

E-mail: Rhonda.Craig@usdoj.gov (E-mail subject line should read: “CTAS Eligibility Review Request for [insert name of Tribal political sub-unit]”)

Fax: 202-307-1419

Expedited/Overnight Mail:

Rhonda M. Craig, Attorney-Advisor
Office of the General Counsel
Office of Justice Programs
Rm: 5414
810 7th Street, N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20001

30. Is the demographic form scored?

Yes, the demographic form is scored based on completeness and is worth 5% of the total score. Where applicants are not able to provide specific data, the score will be determined by the applicant's explanation for not being able to provide the requested information.

31. May a Tribe request funding to provide food and/or beverage at meetings, conferences or trainings?

Generally funding may not be used to purchase food and/or beverages for any meeting, conference, training, or other event under any CTAS Purpose Area. Exceptions may be available in very rare and unique circumstances, with the approval of the awarding office.

Note: Costs for food and beverages are not allowable under Purpose Area #1 (COPS), however COPS does allow a per diem for approved program-related travel. In addition, regarding proposed activities under OVW Purpose Areas #5 and #6, please see the following:

OVW funding cannot be used to purchase food and/or beverages for any meeting, conference, training, or other event, except if one of the following applies (justification for an exception listed below must be included in the budget narrative):

  • The location of the event is not in close proximity to food establishments. It should be a priority to try to secure a location near reasonably priced and accessible commercial food establishments.
  • Not serving food will significantly lengthen the day or necessitate extending the meeting to achieve meeting outcomes.
  • A special presentation at a conference requires a plenary address where there is no other time for food to be obtained.
  • Other extenuating circumstances necessitate the provision of food.

Please contact the purpose area specific contacts if your Tribe requires more information. The link to OJP's policy on funding related to food and/or beverages at meetings is http://www.ojp.gov/funding/pdfs/foodandbeverage.pdf

32. Are the narratives required to be doubled-spaced?

Double-spacing is not a requirement. However, it is important for applicants to ensure readability by selecting a font and format that is large and legible enough to be read easily by peer reviewers and staff. Use of the narrative template is preferred but if the template is not used, a font size of 12 and double-spacing is preferred.

33. How do I compete Section IV( 2) Facilities and Services of the Demographic Form?

Applicants should check and provide data for all the facilities and services located within the reservation/jurisdiction described in Question 7 of the Demographic Form. Applicants are able to describe these services and facilities in more detail in Part B of the Tribal Community and Justice Profile.

34. I am a Consortium and represent multiple Tribes how do I complete the Demographic Form?

If you are a consortium, or entity that represents more than one Tribe in your application check the type of applicant you are in Question 10 and list all the Tribes you represent in your application in Question 10a. Additionally, when you provide the requested data, please aggregate the data for all the Tribes represented in your application.

35. What is considered a good application?

When planning and writing a grant application, it is important to remember that most applications are submitted in a highly competitive forum. No grant application is guaranteed to receive funding as hundreds of grant applications may be submitted to the same organization to compete for the exact same funds. Given this fact, applicants must view their grant application as a document with at least two goals: (1) to inform the reader of their plans, and (2) to persuade the reader that their project is worthy of funding. Additionally, samples of good applications can be found at http://www.justice.gov/tribal/docs/ctas-sample-applications.pdf.

36. Can a tribe apply for a purpose area as part of a consortium and as an individual tribe?

Yes. Applying for a purpose area as part of a consortium does not preclude a tribe from applying for the same purpose area as an individual tribe provided that the applications are for "different" projects/activities. The "same" application cannot be submitted as part of a consortium and also as an independent tribe but a tribe could apply for a different project in the same purpose area. For example, a tribe could apply under purpose area #3 as part of a consortium that is requesting a drug and alcohol prevention project that would serve all of the participating tribes and the tribe could also apply independently under purpose area #3 for a drug & alcohol treatment program for court involved individuals. As long as the requested projects are distinct and separate there is no prohibition.

37. What is the maximum consultant rate for each DOJ component involved with CTAS?

The maximum consultant rates are as follows:

Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS): $550

Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA-OJP): $450

Office for Victims of Crime (OVC-OJP): $650

Office on Violence Against Women (OVW): $650

Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP-OJP): $450

Note: Grantees must maintain documentation even for consultants below the rate.
The documentation must show that whatever rate the consultant is paid is appropriate for the type of work performed, the consultant's expertise, and prior work at that or a higher rate
.

38. Can I write directly in the templates provided on the Tribal website?

No. The templates provided on the website are for sample purposes only.
The actual fillable forms can be access through DOJ's online Grant Management System (GMS).

39. Is there a required format for the project timeline and where can I find a sample?

No, there is not a required format for the project timeline. A sample project timeline template can be found at
http://www.justice.gov/tribal/docs/ctas-application-materials.pdf.

40. What is P25 Technology?

Project 25 (P25) is the standard for the design and manufacture of interoperable digital two-way wireless communications products.
Developed in North America with state, local and federal representatives and Telecommunications Industry Association (TIA) governance,
P25 has gained worldwide acceptance for public safety, security, public service, and commercial applications. In addition, P25 is a partnership
between the public safety community and industry to develop a suite of open architecture standards for digital Land Mobile Radio (LMR) equipment, features, and interfaces.

41. Why P25/What are the benefits?

P25 is intended to benefit the public safety community by:

  • Improving radio spectrum resource use
  • Promoting marketplace competition for interoperable products
  • Enabling interoperable communications within and among public safety agencies
  • Providing backward compatibility
  • Establishing a staged migration path

42. Where can I find more information on P25?

For more information on P25, visit the link below: http://www.safecomprogram.gov/library/Lists/Library/Attachments/334/2012_SAFECOM%20Guidance_FINAL.pdf

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HOW TO APPLY

1. When should I register in GMS?
You are urged to resister in GMS (steps 1-5 above) as early as possible and as soon as your Tribe believes it will apply for CTAS funding.

2. When should I submit my application in GMS?
You are urged to submit your complete application (step 6 above) at least 72 hours prior to April 18, 2012.

3. How many applications may I submit?
You will be allowed to submit one application. It is critical that you hit the “SAVE” button in GMS to update, revise and save the application as necessary. Only when the application is complete and contains all requested information stated in the solicitation, should you hit the “SUBMIT” button in GMS.

4. What if I realize after I have successfully submitted my application in GMS, that I made an error in my application?
An application can be revised in GMS up until the application deadline, April 18, 2012. Please note that only the final version of an application submitted in GMS will be considered.

5. What if I experience technical difficulties with GMS?
If you experience technical difficulties at any point during this process, please e-mail the GMSHelpDesk@usdoj.gov or call 1-888-549-9901 (option 3), Monday-Friday (except federal holidays) from 6:00 a.m. to 12 midnight Eastern Time.

6. What if my Tribe has no Internet access and cannot submit an application electronically to GMS?
For applicants without Internet access who cannot submit an application electronically to DOJ’s Grant Management System, please contact the Response Center at 1-800-421-6770.

7. I do not have an Excel version or PC that supports the Excel Budget Detail and Narrative worksheet provided for CTAS applicants. What should I do?
This document requires that Macros be enabled to work properly and it will only be fully functional with Excel 2007 or later models. Additionally, Excel 2008 version for Macintosh PCs may not run the macros for the CTAS Budget Detail and Narrative worksheet. If you are in this situation, you are permitted to use other application software (i.e., Microsoft Word) to capture the budget detail and narrative information for your tribe’s grant application. You are not required to use the specific budget form, but you do need to capture the same information. Please view the sample budget to see what information you should include.

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POST-AWARD

1. What is the Federal Funding Accountability and Transparency Act Sub-Award Reporting System?
The Federal Funding Accountability and Transparency Act of 2006 (FFATA) requires, among other things, that information on federal awards (federal financial assistance and expenditures) be made available to the public via a single, searchable website, which is www.USASpending.gov.

Applicants should anticipate that all recipients of awards of $25,000 or more under this solicitation, consistent with FFATA, will be required to report award information on any first-tier sub-awards totaling $25,000 or more, and, in certain cases, to report information on the names and total compensation of the five most highly compensated executives of the recipient and first-tier sub-recipients.

The FFATA Sub-award Reporting System (FSRS), accessible via the Internet at www.fsrs.gov, is the reporting tool prime grantees under this solicitation will use to capture and report sub-award information and any executive compensation data required by FFATA. The sub-award information entered in FSRS will then be displayed on www.USASpending.gov associated with the prime award, furthering Federal spending transparency.

Each applicant entity must ensure that it has the necessary processes and systems in place to comply with the applicable reporting requirements should it receive funding. Tribes without internet access for whom this requirement would be problematic should contact the Response Center at 1-800-421-6770 or by e-mail at tribalgrants@usdoj.gov. to discuss alternatives.

For additional information, you can review the award condition “Reporting Subawards and Executive Compensation (October 2010”) on the www.tribaljusticeandsafety.gov website.

2. Am I required to maintain active Central Contractor Registration during my award period, if I receive a CTAS award?
Yes. An applicant must register with the Central Contractor Registration (CCR) database in order to receive funding. Should you receive an award, as an award recipient, you must maintain the currency of the recipient entity’s information in the CCR until you submit the final financial report required under the award or receive the final payment, whichever is later. This requires that you review and update the information at least annually after the initial registration, and more frequently if required by changes in your information or another award term.

For additional information, you can review the award condition “Central Contractor Registration and Universal Identifier Requirements” on the www.tribaljusticeandsafety.gov website.

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PURPOSE AREAS

1. Public safety and community policing (COPS - Tribal Resources Grant Program-Hiring and Tribal Resources Grant Program- Equipment/Training)

1. My Tribe is considering applying for Purpose Area #1 funding. How can I tell if my agency is eligible to apply?
Only federally-recognized Indian Tribal governments, as determined by the Secretary of the Interior, may apply. This includes Alaska Native villages, and Tribal consortia consisting of two or more federally-recognized Indian Tribes. Furthermore, to qualify under Purpose Area #1, applicants must have an established law enforcement agency or an existing contract with the Bureau of Indian Affairs for law enforcement services, or an existing contract with a state or local agency for law enforcement services. We will not provide funding for start-up agencies under this program; however, if the entity has passed appropriate resolutions establishing a police department, and have dedicated funding toward that department prior to the application deadline, they will be considered for funding.

2. What is an established law enforcement agency for purposes of eligibility for COPS funding?
A law enforcement agency is established and operational if the jurisdiction has passed authorizing legislation and it has a current operating budget."

3. What projects can be supported under Purpose Area #1?
Under Purpose Area #1, applicants may request funding for newly hired and/or rehired officers; law enforcement equipment/technology and law enforcement training, including and not limited to:

Strategic Planning: Strategic planning activities related to community policing.

Hiring: Approved entry-level salaries and fringe benefits of newly hired or rehired full-time sworn career law enforcement officers including Village Public Safety Officers; Background investigations for newly hired officer positions. Positions may be requested specifically to address methamphetamine issues within the Tribe.

Equipment: Law enforcement equipment, uniforms, bullet-proof vests, basic-issue equipment, and police vehicles, such as police cars, SUVs, ATVs, boats, etc. (as needed for law enforcement purposes) to include anti-methamphetamine activities; Technology such as: computer hardware and software, mobile data terminals, narrow-band radio upgrades, and dispatch and communication systems. Applicants who do not already have an information gathering system compatible with the FBI Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) System are encouraged to apply for funds to pay for National Incident-Based Reporting System (NIBRS)/UCR compliant crime data systems.

Training: Law enforcement training, such as but not limited to, basic and comprehensive or specialized police training at a state academy or the Indian Police Academy in Artesia, New Mexico, as well as community policing, computer and crime reporting (e.g., Uniform Crime Reports) training. To include anti-methamphetamine training

Travel: Airfare, lodging, and mileage reimbursement for meeting or training costs related to Purpose Area activities, including costs associated with DOJ-required training.

4. What information must I include under the Purpose Area #1?
Using the Purpose Area 1 template applicants are required to provide information demonstrating how grant funding will be used to increase their involvement in community policing. Answers to the narrative questions in this section should be specifically linked to the community policing activities to be implemented or enhanced through the grant project.

5. My Tribal government has multiple components of law enforcement departments (e.g., Department of Public Safety and Fish and Wildlife Department) that we are including in our request under Purpose Area #1. Do we need to report cumulative full and part-time budgeted sworn force strength numbers for all departments?
Your application should report all cumulative, full- and part-time budgeted sworn force
strength numbers for all law enforcement departments in your Tribe which would
receive funding through this request if awarded.

6. How much funding is my Tribe eligible to receive under Purpose Area #1?
The COPS office plans to award approximately50 grants at approximately $450,000 to $1,000,000 per award. However, the amount of funding for which your agency is eligible is determined by several factors including your Tribe’s current sworn force strength. All funding is subject to availability.

7. Will my Tribe receive the total amount of funding we requested under Purpose Area #1?
Purpose Area #1 grants are intended to meet the most pressing, otherwise unfunded law
enforcement needs of Tribal applicants. However, grant awards may be limited based on the availability of funding.

8. Is there a local match requirement under Purpose Area #1?
No. Purpose Area #1 grants will provide 100 percent of the funding for approved law
enforcement hiring, equipment/technology and training costs.

9. What is the length of the grant award?
Purpose Area #1 grants are for a 36 month implementation period. If your Tribe is awarded a grant it will receive funding to cover the entry-level salary and benefits of awarded officer positions and/or one-time purchases for allowable costs incurred during the 36 months following the grant award start date unless an extension for additional time is granted.

10. My Tribe’s law enforcement agency needs additional officer positions. Can we apply for funding to include these positions?
Yes. Purpose Area #1 grants for 2012 do include hiring grants for newly hired and/or rehired full time sworn officer and Village Public Safety Officer positions.

11. If we are awarded a grant, will our Tribal government be subjected to monitoring, reporting, and evaluation requirements?
Federal regulations require that any financial assistance from the federal government be
monitored to ensure that those funds are spent properly. Awarded agencies will be
responsible for submitting periodic programmatic progress reports and quarterly federal financial reports. In addition, the COPS Office is interested in tracking the progress of its programs and the development of its grantees’ community policing plans. Therefore, all grantees will be required to cooperate with grant monitoring activities of the U.S. Department of Justice, including but not limited to the COPS Office, the Office of the Inspector General, or an entity designated by COPS.

The COPS Office Monitoring staff may take a number of monitoring approaches, such as site visits, office-based grant reviews, and periodic surveys to gather information. COPS may seek information including, but not limited to, your agency’s compliance with non-supplanting and financial requirements of the grant and progress toward achieving your community policing plan. COPS Grant Program and Monitoring Specialists as well as auditors are particularly interested in confirming that the purchase of approved items is consistent with the applicant’s proposal.

12. Will my Tribe be responsible for submitting progress reports to the COPS Office for Purpose Area #1?
Yes. To assist in fulfilling the DOJ’s responsibilities under the Government Performance and Results Act (GPRA), P.L. 103-62, applicants who receive grant funding must provide data that measures the results of their work. As part of the periodic progress reports, grantees must report on their progress toward implementing community policing strategies.

13. Would the COPS Office Purpose Area #1 allow for the purchase of a database system which would allow multiple databases throughout tribal departments to share information pertinent to law enforcement?
Yes.

14. Are Tribal Conservation Departments eligible to receive grant funding under Purpose Area #1?
Yes, if a Tribe’s Conservation Department has primary law enforcement authority it is eligible to receive grant funding under Purpose Area #1 as part of a Tribe’s single application. For clarification and as stated in the solicitation, applicants must have an established law enforcement agency, an existing contract with the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) for law enforcement services, or an existing contract with a state or local agency for law enforcement services.

15. Can our police department request additional funding for Purpose Area #1 if they received a grant for this year already through COPS?
Yes, you can apply under Purpose Area #1 if you are an existing grantee.

16. Must the law enforcement agency retain hired officers after the grant period ends?
Yes. Tribe’s must plan to retain grant hired officers for 12 months after the expiration of the grant.

17. How many officers should our Tribe request?
Although there is not a predetermined number of officers a Tribe may request funding for, the COPS office has provided sworn officer request guidelines that will help Tribes determine their need along with our evaluation criteria for funding. The guidelines and evaluation criteria can be found at www.justice.gov/tribal.

18. What items may be requested under Purpose Area #1?
There are a variety of allowable costs Tribes can request under Purpose Area #1. The COPS Office has provided a list of allowable and unallowable costs, which can be found at www.justice.gov/tribal

19. CTAS does not have the Tribal Methamphetamine Enforcement Purpose Area, may items still be requested to address methamphetamine issues facing the Tribe?
Yes. Although the Methamphetamine Enforcement Purpose Area is not available, Tribes may request Officers and equipment to address a methamphetamine problem within the Tribe.

20. Does COPS pay for background checks?

Yes, COPS does pay for background checks. Although they are not required,
background checks are highly recommended.

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2. Comprehensive Planning Demonstration Project (BJA)

1. What projects are supported under Purpose Area #2?
Under Purpose Area 2 applicants may request funding engage in a data-informed planning process to develop a written, strategic plan that will guide justice system development to promote community wellness and safety. The applicant’s strategic plan should identify the priority needs facing the applicant’s justice system and outline a detailed, strength-based strategy.

Equipment: Purchase general office equipment such as computers, fax machines, printers, scanners, etc. necessary to assist with the strategic planning process.

Training: Work closely with DOJ training and technical assistance providers to receive support for all aspects of the strategic planning process, to include support for facilitating the strategic planning process, forming a strategic planning team, identifying community strengths and resources, defining community challenges, and developing strategies to strengthen the applicant’s justice system and promote community wellness and safety.

Travel: Airfare, lodging, mileage reimbursement, and per diem associated with regional, and national meetings or strategic planning trainings, including costs associated with DOJ-required trainings.

2. How much funding is my Tribe eligible to receive under Purpose Area #2?
BJA plans to award 2-4 grants up to $75,000 per award.

3. What is the length of the grant award?
Purpose Area #2 grants are for an 18 month period unless an extension of time is granted.

4. If we are awarded a grant, will our Tribal government be subjected to monitoring, reporting, and evaluation requirements?
Federal regulations require that any financial assistance from the federal government be
monitored to ensure that those funds are spent properly. Awarded agencies will be
responsible for submitting periodic programmatic progress reports and quarterly federal financial reports.

5. Will my Tribe be responsible for submitting progress reports to BJA for Purpose Area #2?
Yes. To assist in fulfilling the DOJ’s responsibilities under the Government Performance and Results Act (GPRA), P.L. 103-62, applicants who receive grant funding must provide data that measures the results of their work.

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3. Justice systems, and alcohol and substance abuse (BJA-Tribal Courts Assistance Program and Indian Alcohol and Substance Abuse Prevention Program)

1. What projects can be supported under Purpose Area #3?
Allowable projects under this purpose area can develop, enhance and continue Tribal justice systems including: alcohol and substance abuse prevention, law enforcement, pretrial services, risk and needs assessment development and implementation, diversion programming, tribal court services, indigent defense services, healing to wellness courts, intervention and/or treatment, detention programming, community corrections, reentry planning and programming, justice system infrastructure enhancement, justice system information sharing, etc.; respond to and prevent alcohol and substance abuse related crimes; implement enhanced authorities and provisions under the Tribal Law and Order Act and/or develop, implement, and enhance substance abuse prevention and treatment programs including those that prevent and address the needs of drug-endangered children.

Examples of projects that can be supported are:
Strategic planning: Developing Tribal Action Plans for alcohol and substance abuse; Increasing coordination with relevant non-Tribal agencies and organizations and among all levels of the Tribe; Engaging in strategic planning efforts to address the needs of the Tribe’s justice system and to comprehensively address alcohol and substance abuse-related crime.

Equipment: General office equipment such as computers, fax machines, printers, scanners, surveillance cameras, digital cameras, office furniture, courtroom furniture, computer networks, court management systems, electronic monitoring/alcohol monitoring bracelets and related equipment etc.

Prevention: Protecting communities from alcohol and drug use and/or production; Culturally relevant and appropriate substance abuse prevention programs.

Law Enforcement: Identifying, apprehending, and prosecuting individuals who illegally transport, distribute, and abuse alcohol and controlled as well as illegal substances in Tribal communities (subject to existing legal authority);

Tribal Courts: Planning new or enhancing existing Tribal courts, such as peacemaking courts, healing to wellness courts, sentencing circles, and other alternative justice courts; Staffing of attorneys, advocates, probation and pretrial service officers, Tribal court judges and other court staff, clerical support staff, etc.; Provision of indigent defense/criminal legal defense services ; Activities relating to the implementation of provisions of the Tribal Law and Order Act.

Treatment: Integrating Tribal, federal, state, and local services and culturally appropriate treatment for individuals diverted from the tribal justice systems, offenders involved in the tribal justice system (including the incarcerated population), and reentering offenders and their families.

Risk and Needs Assessment: Developing and integrating the use of risk and needs assessment tools into the tribal justice system decision-making process.

Diversion and Alternatives to Incarceration: Employing decision-making models and programming to divert low-risk offenders from incarceration, including: community supervision, mental health and drug abuse treatment, job training and placement; housing assistance, education, and family and community supports; Electronic monitoring/alcohol monitoring bracelet programs.

Reentry: Developing, implementing and enhancing culturally appropriate reentry programs. Provision of treatment, aftercare, and other reentry supportive services to offenders reentering communities from tribal, local, state and federal correctional facilities.

Training: Registration fees and lodging costs associated with training events and related to Purpose Area activities; Costs associated with obtaining expert knowledge to assist with the development/enhancement of the program, such as culturally appropriate training, technical assistance, treatment, information technology, etc.

Travel: Airfare, lodging, and mileage reimbursement for meeting or training costs related to Purpose Area activities, including costs associated with DOJ-required training.

2. Can I request funding for both a Tribal court program and an alcohol and substance abuse program under purpose area #3?
Yes, you may request grant funding for one or more areas of focus within this Purpose Area This can be either one comprehensive project integrating the two areas or two distinct separate projects with separate program management depending on the needs of your Tribe. If you choose to request finding for two distinct programs, your application should show how the two projects are related and how, together, they will improve public safety and the overall justice system for your tribe. Regardless, you should still submit *only one* Purpose Area narrative for purpose area 3 describing all of the programmatic activities that you are proposing under the broad area of justice systems and alcohol and substance abuse. Your narrative may encompass two different programs (eg: 1 court focused & 1 alcohol and substance abuse focused) but they must both be described within a single narrative.

3. Are grant deliverables subject to approval?
Yes, deliverables produced with grant funds must be reviewed and approved by BJA prior to the production and dissemination of said products. Examples of deliverables include: conferences, workshops, billboards, flyers, pamphlets, training curricula, etc.

4. Is a match required?
No, a match is not required.

5. Am I eligible to apply for Purpose Area #3 funds if I received a grant under the FY 2011 Purpose Area #3?
Yes, grant recipients of FY 2011 CTAS funding are eligible to apply for funds under Purpose Area #3 of this solicitation

6. Will DOJ offer any technical assistance to grant recipients under this program?
Yes, DOJ will partner with a technical assistance provider that will provide training and technical assistance to grant recipients via workshop(s) and ad hoc assistance.

7. Is it a requirement to have an advisory board?
No, an advisory board is not required. However, an advisory board is recommended. If the Tribe establishes an advisory board it should be sustained throughout the entire project period and should emphasize Tribal and non-Tribal partnerships. Advisory board members are encouraged to attend BJA training and technical assistance activities.

8. Who should be a part of the advisory board?
It is recommended that an advisory board consist of a minimum of seven members. The advisory board should be led by a member of the tribal council or a criminal justice partner (such as lead law enforcement official, tribal justice, lead correction official) depending on the focus of the criminal justice component of the program. The Co-Chair of the advisory board should be a lead representative from an alcohol, substance abuse agency or field. The advisory board should include representation from key stakeholders, and decision-makers within the Tribe to ensure successful strategy development and implementation. Applicants should give strong consideration to including representatives from tribal government, tribal law enforcement and tribal courts (if your Tribe has this structure), and other key partners and agencies within and outside tribal community addressing issues such as: treatment/health/mental health; adult and juvenile corrections/probation; education; economic development; social/family related services.

9. Can a Tribal government with a service population of less than 1,000 apply to plan, implement or enhance a Single Tribal Court System?
Yes, Tribes or Tribal consortia of any size can apply to plan, implement, or enhance a new tribal court system. However, Tribes with a service population of less than 1,000 are encouraged to consider applying as part of intertribal consortia.

10. Do Tribes have to allocate a specific amount over the project period to cover travel and other costs for attending BJA training/court-related meetings?
Technical assistance and training remains a critical component toward planning, implementing, enhancing, and sustaining tribal justice systems. You should budget for travel costs of up to two Department of Justice-sponsored grant meetings. You should estimate the costs of travel and accommodations for two staff to attend two meetings, with one trip to Washington D.C. and one in their region. The time period for each grant meeting will be approximately 3 days.

12. If my tribe is applying for multiple areas of focus under PA #3 can we request $ $750,000 for each project?
No, regardless of the number of areas of focusthe recommended range for funding is$250,000 to $750,000 total.

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4. Corrections and correctional alternatives (BJA - Correctional Systems and Correctional Alternatives on Tribal Lands Program)

1. What projects can be supported under Purpose Area #4?
This Purpose Area can support efforts related to planning, constructing and renovating facilities associated with the incarceration and rehabilitation of juvenile and adult offenders subject to tribal jurisdiction. Examples include the following:

Justice system planning efforts: Related to constructing and renovating detention, multipurpose justice, and community-based correctional alternative (treatment or other rehabilitative services) facilities associated with the incarceration and rehabilitation of juvenile and adult offenders subject to Tribal jurisdiction; related to the development and implementation of community-based correctional alternatives to meet the needs of the Tribe’s population; comprehensive strategic planning.

Renovation or construction: Of a new or existing detention, multipurpose justice (including courts and police departments), or correctional alternative facility that includs adults and/or juvenile populations; renovation of correctional facilities that are no longer considered safe and secure to serve as holding facilities, community-based correctional alternative facilities, or multipurpose justice centers; constructing regional detention centers on Indian land for long-term incarceration of offenders subject to Tribal jurisdiction; renovation or construction of transitional living facilities (halfway houses). .

Other costs associated with construction or renovation of a facility: Such as roads, sewer, and water hook-ups, land preparation, and other items normally associated with construction site work; items associated with managing the planned construction or renovation process and construction materials necessary to build or renovate facilities and associated infrastructure; furniture, surveillance cameras, or other items affixed or integral to the facility; facility maintenance; contracts with private entities to increase the efficiency of the construction of Tribal jails.

Travel: Airfare, lodging, and mileage reimbursement for meeting or training costs related to Purpose Area activities and DOJ-required training.

2. If a Tribal government has received renovation/construction funds from BJA in previous years, is it eligible to apply for funding under the Purpose Area #4?
Yes. However, the tribe should demonstrate how the FY 2012 proposal complements, builds on, and/or differs from effort(s) funded in previous years.

3. Will BJA offer any technical assistance to grant recipients under this program?
Yes. BJA will provide training and technical assistance to grant recipients under this program.

4. Is it a requirement of applicants pursuing funds for Purpose Area #4 to have an advisory board?
Yes. Applicants that apply for funds to pursue justice planning efforts must establish a Strategic Planning Advisory board for the project. The advisory board should include a well-rounded representation of the Tribal criminal justice system including, but not limited to: representatives from Tribal government, criminal justice systems, treatment/health/mental health components, social/family-related services and community groups, local service providers, businesses, community-based organizations, faith-based service providers, media, and individuals within the proposed project’s target population. An applicant may elect to establish only one Advisory Board for multiple Purpose Areas if the members include appropriate representation required for individual Purpose Areas. Applicants must be able to address in their application the composition of the advisory board and how the team members will support the implementation of the proposed project.

5. Is a budget match required?
No. Matching funds were eliminated for Purpose Area #4, Corrections and Correctional Alternatives.

6. Do Tribal governments have to allocate a specific amount over the project period to cover travel and other costs for attending BJA training/meetings?
You must budget for travel costs of up to two Department of Justice-sponsored grant meetings. You should estimate the costs of travel and accommodations for two staff to attend two meetings, with one trip to Washington D.C. and one in your region. The time period for each grant meeting will be approximately 3 days.

7. Do applicants have to submit a BIA correctional facility needs assessment that supports the Tribe’s application submission?
Applicants are not required to submit a BIA needs assessment as part of the application. However, applicants who will rely on BIA support must describe BIA’s role and contributions with the staffing, operations, and maintenance of the proposed facility renovation or construction. Also, applicants who will rely on BIA assistance should provide letters of support from BIA regarding staffing, maintenance, and operation of the facility. If applicants have received a BIA needs assessment, they are encouraged to reference it in the Purpose Area narrative of the grant application.

A Tribe may submit, by authorizing resolution, a commitment to fund future staffing, maintenance, and operation of the facilities renovated or constructed in lieu of BIA funding support letters, if the Tribe chooses to be responsible for this ongoing cost.

8. Will Purpose Area #4 grant recipients be required to submit project deliverables or data to the Bureau of Justice Assistance?
Yes. In addition to satisfying financial and progress reporting, grant recipients that receive funding under Purpose Area #4 will be required to submit a completed master plan to BJA prior to the end of the grant period. BJA will provide training and technical assistance to grant recipients to facilitate the master plan development process. Additionally, justice system planning grant recipients will be required to report on the status of planning activities as part of the grant performance measures reporting requirement. Data regarding planning activities will be captured in the form of a checklist included as a section within the grant performance measures for this Purpose Area.

9. Can I use funds to renovate or construct a police department or courthouse?
Yes. However, these components must be part of a multi-purpose justice center effort. In previous years, it was not statutorily allowable to use grant funds to construct police departments and courts, but changes in the law have made this permissible for FY 2012.

10. Does the funded facility have to be located on tribal lands? How is “Tribal lands” defined?
Yes. Efforts funded under Purpose Area #4 must be located on Tribal lands. Tribal lands means:

a. All land within the limits of any Indian reservation under the jurisdiction of the United States Government, notwithstanding the issuance of any patent, and including rights-of-way running through the reservation;

b. All dependent Indian communities within the borders of the United States whether within the original or subsequently acquired territory thereof, and whether within or without the limits of a State; and

c. All Indian allotments, the Indian titles to which have not been extinguished, including rights-of way running through the same.

11. If my tribe received funds to renovate or construct a correctional facility previously, can I now apply for Purpose Area #4 funds to renovate or construct a police department and/or a courthouse?
Yes. However, the police department and/or courthouse must be part of a multi-purpose justice center that includes a corrections and/or correctional alternative component.

12. Can my tribe submit more than one application under Purpose Area #4?
No. Only one application will be accepted from each Tribe or Tribal Consortium, covering all Purpose Areas.

13. If my tribe received an American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) CFTL construction or renovation grant, am I permitted to apply for FY 2012CTAS Purpose Area #4 funds to add a new component for a multi-purpose justice center?
Yes. However, please be advised that ARRA funds that have been obligated are available for expenditure until September 30, 2013. Therefore, applicants should ensure that ARRA projects are completed by the deadline. Also, FY 2012 CTAS funding cannot be commingled with ARRA funds. There should be a clear separation of funding used to augment ARRA projects.

14. Can my tribe apply for more than one subcategory (i.e., planning, renovation/construction, correctional alternatives) under Purpose Area 4?
Yes. The tribe may apply for funding under one or all of the subcategories. For single tribes, the maximum amount requested should not exceed the suggested maximum request of $1,000,000 for all subcategories combined. For example, a tribe may apply for renovation/construction of a detention center and correctional alternatives facility for a cumulative total that should not exceed $1,000,000. For regional projects or projects involving multiple tribes, the maximum amount should not exceed the suggested maximum request of $5,000,000. Also, please be advised that tribes applying for renovation/construction funds must ensure that the projects are “shovel ready.” It is not acceptable to apply for planning funds and renovation/construction funds for the same project. For example, tribes applying to renovate or construct a correctional facility cannot also apply for planning funds to conduct planning activities for the same project.

15. If my tribe applies for more than one subcategory (i.e., planning, renovation/construction, correctional alternatives) under Purpose Area 4, does the 12 pages purpose area page limit apply for each subcategory that my tribe applies for?
No. The 12 page limit is cumulative for all subcategories that the tribe may apply for under Purpose Area 4. Applicants may not exceed the 12 page limit requirement for Purpose Area 4 if applying for more than one subcategory.

16. Can tribes submit an application under Purpose Area 4 to fund offender reentry activities such as transitional living facilities (halfway houses)?
Yes. Tribes can use funding under Purpose Area 4 to fund offender reentry activities.

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5. Provide direct intervention and related assistance to victims of sexual assault (OVW - Tribal Sexual Assault Services Program - TSASP)

1. Who is eligible to apply for Purpose Area #5 funding?
Individual Indian Tribes or Tribal government consortia are eligible to apply.

2. What projects may be supported with Purpose Area #5 funding?
Purpose Area #5 is focused on providing direct services for victims of sexual assault, decreasing sexual violence against adults, youth and children, including developing services for victims of sexual assault, strengthening capacity of Indian Tribes to use their sovereign authority to respond to this crime, and to make sure that people who commit these crimes are held responsible. Specific activities include the following:

Staffing: Salary and fringe benefits for: advocates, counselors, volunteer coordinators, manager positions to oversee staff, and any other position that provides or oversees staff providing direct assistance to victims of sexual assault. Individuals contracted to provide direct services to victims such as short-term individual counseling (up to one year) or support groups.
Victim Services: Hotlines; accompaniment and advocacy; crisis intervention, short-term individual (up to one year) and group support services, and comprehensive service coordination and supervision; information and referrals; community-based, linguistically, and culturally specific services and support mechanisms; and development and distribution of relevant materials.
Travel: Mileage reimbursement, air travel, lodging, per diem associated with providing services to victims or attending OVW technical assistance trainings. Travel would also be allowable for attending meetings with other professionals for the purposes of coordinating services for victims.
Outreach: Materials such as brochures, posters, information packets, television/radio or other media spots.
Equipment & Supplies: Computers, cell phones, telephones, pagers, printers, fax machines, copiers and other similar items; office supplies and office furniture for staff.

Cultural and Traditional Practices: Applicants are encouraged to incorporate cultural and traditional practices, including talking circles, healing ceremonies for those who have been sexually assaulted, gender specific traditional gatherings for victims and survivors, and sweat lodges for survivors, in proposed activities.

3. Are current OVW Tribal Sexual Assault Services Program grantees eligible to apply for Purpose Area #5 funding this year?
OVW will accept applications for funding from all current Tribal Sexual Assault Services Program grantees, including grantees who received funding in Fiscal Year 2010. Current grantees are strongly discouraged from seeking funding to continue/maintain projects that were funded in Fiscal Year 2010. Grantees should instead request funding to enhance or expand the activities that were funded in Fiscal Year 2010.

4. What are the estimated award amounts for Purpose Area #5?
Eligible applicants should request up to $300,000. Eligible applicants who have a current Tribal Sexual Assault Services Program award are encouraged to think carefully about their need for continuation funding.

5. What is the award period for Purpose Area #5?
All awards will be made for a period of 36 months.

6. What other information should I know about the Purpose Area requirements?

Confidentiality: In accordance with 42 U.S.C. 13925(b)(2), applicants receiving OVW funding, and their subgrantees, must protect the confidentiality and privacy of persons receiving OVW - funded services to support victims’ safety.

Unallowable Activities: The purpose of Tribal Sexual Assault Services Program funds is to provide core sexual assault services and related assistance to victims of sexual violence including, but not limited to, traditional healing methods, advocacy, crisis intervention, supportive short term counseling (group and individual), and accompanying the victim through the criminal justice system, medical treatment, and other social services. Prevention education efforts, training of other professionals, media campaigns, and criminal justice activities (e.g. developing criminal code) are not allowable.

Travel Budget Requirement: Applicants should budget $15,000 in travel over the course of the project for OVW technical assistance, which includes at least two required DOJ-sponsored trainings. Applicants from Alaska should budget $20,000.

7. Can child victims of sexual assault be served under Purpose Area #5?
Yes. Applicants should clearly articulate in the purpose area narrative goals and activities pertaining to serving child victims of sexual assault.

8. What purpose area should be used if I want to provide services to sexual assault victims?
You can submit a request for Purpose Area #5 and/or Purpose Area #6. The Purpose Area narrative, budget detail and budget narrative should clearly outline what activities and personnel (and other budget items) pertain to serving sexual assault victims.

9. Are matching funds required?
No. Matching funds are not required for this Purpose Area.

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6. Enhance responses to violence committed against Indian women and girls (OVW - Violence Against Women Tribal Governments Program)

1. Who is eligible to apply for Purpose Area #6 funding?
Individual Indian Tribes, Tribal government consortia, and organizations acting as the
authorized designee of an individual Tribe are all eligible to apply.

2. What projects may be supported with Purpose Area #6 funding?

Strategic Planning: Comprehensive strategic planning to develop and enhance governmental strategies to increase the safety of Indian women.

Staffing: Salary and fringe benefits for: victim advocates; prosecutors; Tribal court judges and other court staff; law enforcement officers; probation officers; domestic violence or sexual assault response team coordinators; staff for a domestic violence shelter, safe home, or transitional housing facility; civil legal assistance attorneys; Batterers’ Intervention Program staff; staff for a supervised visitation and safe exchange center; paralegals; clerical support staff; counselors; volunteer coordinators; manager positions to oversee staff, and any other position that provides or oversees staff providing direct assistance to victims of domestic violence, sexual assault, or stalking.

Victim Services: Providing services to victims of domestic violence, sexual assault or stalking, including rape crisis hotlines; emergency shelter services; accompaniment and advocacy; crisis intervention, short-term individual and group support services, and comprehensive service coordination and supervision; information and referrals; community-based, linguistically, and culturally specific services and support mechanisms; and development and distribution of relevant materials for domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking victims; Transitional housing assistance for victims of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking; Legal advice or representation to victims of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking who need assistance with legal issues that result from abuse; Providing supervised visitation and safe exchange programs to allow children to visit with their non-custodial parent in cases where one parent has committed domestic violence, sexual assault, or stalking against the other.

Criminal Justice Interventions: Strengthening the Tribal criminal justice system’s response to domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking committed against Indian women by establishing dedicated court dockets, building coordinated community responses including Sexual Assault Response Teams, revising tribal codes, establishing culturally-appropriate Batterers’ Intervention Programs, conducting fatality reviews, entering into law enforcement or prosecution cross-designation or cooperative agreements with federal, state, or local partners, and undertaking activities necessary to implement enhanced sentencing under the federal Tribal Law and Order Act (TLOA).

Training & Travel: Local mileage reimbursement for program staff; airfare, hotel, and per diem to travel to OVW-sponsored training and technical assistance events; Costs for training law enforcement, prosecutors, judges, and other criminal justice personnel on how to respond to crimes of violence against women; Costs for training medical professionals or lay health providers to perform sexual assault forensic examinations.

Prevention: Outreach and awareness posters, service brochures, editorials/newspaper articles, PSAs, radio/TV ads, videos, fact sheets; Curriculum development, training, community teaching, training, and awareness efforts; Local meeting costs tied directly to an outreach strategy that promotes coordinated efforts within the community to address crimes and the needs of victims of domestic violence, sexual assault, stalking and teen dating violence.

Equipment & Supplies: Equipment such as digital cameras; video cameras; general office equipment including computers, printers, fax machines, scanners; office furniture for project staff; furnishings and security systems for a domestic violence shelter, safe home, or transitional housing units; LCD projectors; vehicles for use by program staff; equipment necessary to establish a protection order registry, sex offender registry, or information-sharing database; small appliances and cleaning supplies for a shelter, safe home, or transitional housing units, etc.; supplies such as rape kits; general office supplies; postage; supplies necessary to create brochures, posters, fliers, resource manuals, training manuals, etc.; materials for traditional arts and crafts.

Cultural and Traditional Practices: Applicants are encouraged to incorporate cultural and traditional practices, including talking circles, healing ceremonies for those who have been sexually assaulted, gender specific traditional gatherings for victims and survivors, and sweat lodges for survivors, in proposed activities.

3. Are there additional eligibility requirements for Purpose Area #6?

Eligibility Exception [only for Purpose Area #6]: An organization may apply that is acting as the authorized designee of a federally-recognized Indian Tribe. If the applicant is a Tribal designee under Purpose Area #6, OVW Violence Against Women Tribal Governments Program, the applicant will need a tribal resolution, or equivalent legal enactment, from the tribe as part of the application which should 1) authorize the applicant to submit an application on behalf of the federally-recognized Indian Tribe; and 2) state the Tribe’s support for the project and its commitment to participate in the project if it is selected for funding. This resolution or equivalent legal enactment must be current, sufficient to demonstrate authority for the application, contain authorizing signature(s), and submitted by the application’s due date.

Collaborative Partnership: Applications for this Purpose Area should demonstrate that the proposal was developed in consultation with one of the following groups or organizations: (1) a nonprofit, nongovernmental Indian victim services provider organization such as a domestic violence shelter program or rape crisis center; (2) a nonprofit, nongovernmental Tribal domestic violence or sexual assault coalition; or (3) an advisory committee which includes women from the community to be served by the proposed project. Prior to receipt of an award and the release of grant funds, the applicant will be required to provide OVW with a letter of support from a qualified partner.

4. How can my organization demonstrate that it has been authorized to apply for Purpose Area #6 funding on behalf of a Tribe?

If the applicant is a Tribal designee under Purpose Area #6, OVW Violence Against Women Tribal Governments Program, the applicant will need a tribal resolution, or equivalent legal enactment, from the tribe as part of the application which should 1) authorize the applicant to submit an application on behalf of the federally-recognized Indian Tribe; and 2) state the Tribe’s support for the project and its commitment to participate in the project if it is selected for funding. This resolution or equivalent legal enactment must be current, sufficient to demonstrate authority for the application, contain authorizing signature(s), and submitted by the application’s due date.

5. Are current OVW Tribal Governments Program or Tribal Sexual Assault Services Program grantees eligible to apply for Purpose Area #6 funding this year?
OVW will accept applications for funding from all current Tribal Governments Program grantees, including grantees who received funding in Fiscal Years 2007-2011. Current grantees are strongly discouraged from seeking funding to continue/maintain projects that were funded in Fiscal Years 2010-2011. Grantees who received funding in Fiscal Years 2010-2011 should instead request funding to enhance or expand the activities that were funded in those years.

6. What are the estimated award amounts for Purpose Area #6?
Eligible applicants that have never before received funding from OVW may request up to $450,000. Eligible applicants who have a current Tribal Governments Program award are encouraged to think carefully about their need for continuation funding. It is unlikely that OVW will be able to award applicants who are seeking continuation funding more than $900,000.

7. What is the award period for Purpose Area #6?
All awards will be made for a period of 36 months.

8. Can funding under Purpose Area #6 be used to assist victims of child abuse or victims of crime?
In general, no. Purpose Area #6 funding can generally only be used to address incidents of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking committed against adult and adolescent victims. The funding cannot be used to provide direct services to victims of child abuse or victims of crimes other than domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault and stalking.

9. What other information should I know about the Purpose Area requirements?

Confidentiality: In accordance with 42 U.S.C. 13925(b)(2), applicants receiving OVW funding, and their subgrantees, must protect the confidentiality and privacy of persons receiving OVW - funded services to support victims’ safety.

Activities That May Compromise Victim Safety and/or Recovery: Applications for this Purpose Area will be reviewed and evaluated on the extent to which the applicant proposes sound strategies to enhance victim safety and offender accountability. Examples of activities which are discouraged (and for which points will be deducted ) are ordering victims and offenders to attend mandatory couples counseling or mediation, operating anger management classes instead of batterer intervention programs, and limiting the number of times a victim can access services.

Travel Budget Requirement: Applicants from the lower 48 states must budget $20,000 in travel over the course of the project for OVW technical assistance, which includes the two required DOJ-sponsored trainings identified in the “Budget Detail Worksheet and Narrative” section of this solicitation. Applicants from Alaska must budget $25,000.

10. Are matching funds required?
No. Matching funds are not required for this Purpose Area. Applicants are strongly discouraged from including matching funds in their proposed budget for Purpose Area #6.

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7. Children’s Justice Act Partnerships for Indian Communities (OVC)

1. Who is eligible to apply for Purpose Area #7 funding?
Individual Indian Tribes, Tribal government consortia, and organizations acting as the
authorized designee of an individual Tribe are all eligible to apply.

2. Can adult victims be supported under Purpose Area #7?
In general, no. Purpose Area 6 is guided by the Children’s Justice Act Partnerships for Indian Communities Continuation Grant Program (Victims of Crime Act of 1984, Section 1402(g), 42 U.S.C. 10601(g) which supports demonstration projects in American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) communities for the purpose of improving the investigation, prosecution, and handling of child abuse cases, especially cases of child sexual abuse, in a manner that increases support for and lessens trauma to child abuse victims.

3. What activities can be funded under the award?
Allowable activities and services include outreach and awareness, victim assistance services, and travel. Specific examples include the following:

Staffing: Funding may support personnel that provides and oversees direct services to improve the investigation, prosecution and overall handling of child abuse, child sexual abuse or sever physical abuse cases. Direct services may include, but are not limited to, prosecutors, law enforcement, child protection services personnel and other allied professionals.

Coordination/Outreach/Awareness: Funding can be used to support meetings, community forums, development and distribution of protocols/manuals, policies, tribal codes, PSAs, posters, brochures, fact sheets, etc.

Needs Assessment/Strategic Plan/Logic Model: Funding can be used for activities associated with conducting a needs assessment and developing a strategic plan and logic model, to include paying for contract services to help accomplish this required task.

Comprehensive Victim Assistance: Funding must be used to provide comprehensive victim assistance services that may be provided to include, but not limited to, the following: group counseling; emergency food, prorated rent and telephone services, transportation cost for victims, and training law enforcement personnel who handle child sexual abuse cases; and, cultural and traditional practices, such as: talking circles, healing ceremonies, gatherings for victims, survivors, family and community members, etc.

Travel: Airfare, lodging, and mileage reimbursement for meeting or training costs related to Purpose Area activities, including costs associated with DOJ-required training or meetings.

Equipment & Supplies: general office equipment such as computers, fax machines, printers, scanners, office furniture. Supplies include but are not limited to, general office supplies, postage and other supplies necessary to create outreach material such as posters, resource manuals, flyers, etc.

Training: Funding can be used to support training on the investigation and prosecution of child abuse and child sexual abuse, as well as victims assistance

4. What activities cannot be funded under the award?
Prevention- and construction-related costs are not allowed under this award.

5. Are grant deliverables subject to approval?
Yes, deliverables produced with grant funds must be reviewed and approved by OVC prior to the production and dissemination of said products. Examples of deliverables include: conferences, workshops, flyers, pamphlets, training curricula, etc.

6. Can Tribes apply for more than the designated award totals?
Applicants may apply for the approximate award amount of up to $215,000 covering a 3 year project period. DOJ has the discretion to negotiate the scope of work and budget with applicants prior to the awarding of a grant.

7. May the applicant designate which of the performance measures it wishes to address, or is the applicant expected to address all performance measures?
Applicants are expected to address all performance measures under this Program Area. They should describe their ability, through a formal process, to collect information related to the performance measures listed in the solicitation.

8. Are there budgetary restrictions? What restrictions pertain to personnel and fringe benefits?
If a position is supported with OVC funds, total costs associated with “salary and fringe benefits” may not exceed 50 percent of the federal grant amount under the Purpose Area. Additionally, if the applicant is (currently) funding a 1/2 time victim-related position with other federal funds, resources under Purpose Area 7 may complement that position as long as the applicant does not exceed the aforementioned stipulation. Match is not required.

9. Will OVC offer any technical assistance to grant recipients under this program?
Yes, OVC will partner with a technical assistance provider that will provide training and technical assistance to grant recipients via workshop(s) and ad hoc assistance.

10. If we are awarded a grant, will our Tribal government be subjected to monitoring, reporting, and evaluation requirements?
Federal regulations require that any financial assistance from the federal government be
monitored to ensure that those funds are spent properly. Awarded agencies will be
responsible for submitting periodic programmatic progress reports and quarterly federal financial reports.

OVC grant monitoring staff may take a number of monitoring approaches, such as site visits, and office-based grant reviews.

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8. Comprehensive Tribal Victim Assistance Program (OVC)

1. Who is eligible to apply for Purpose Area #8 funding?
Individual Indian Tribes, Tribal government consortia, and organizations acting as the
authorized designee of an individual Tribe are all eligible to apply.

2. Can funds be used to implement a new victim assistance program under Purpose Area 8?
Yes, funds can be used to develop a new or enhance and sustain a comprehensive victim assistance program. The program should provide a coordinated collaborative multidisciplinary response and provide trauma-informed, culturally competent holistic services to victims of crime, their family and the community.

4. What is meant by a coordinated collaborative multidisciplinary response?
Applicants are encouraged to demonstrate strategies that are specific to their community and include collaboration with appropriate local agencies and organizations involved in assisting victims. They must also show their capacity to coordinate with other agencies serving crime victims such as U.S. Attorneys’ Offices; Federal Bureau of Investigation field offices; state VOCA administrators; Bureau of Indian Affairs Law Enforcement Services; state and county law enforcement agencies; the Indian Health Service; mental health clinics, hospitals; and other appropriate tribal and nontribal agencies.

3. What activities can be funded under the award?
Allowable activities and services include outreach and awareness, victim assistance services, and travel. Specific examples include the following:

Staffing: Funding supports personnel that provides and oversees staff providing direct victim assistance to victims of crime, i.e. advocates, case managers, response team coordinators, counselors, volunteers, individuals contracted to provide direct services to victims such as short-term individual counseling or support groups, etc. All personnel must be clearly linked to victim assistance program activities.

Coordination/Outreach/Awareness: Funding can be used to support meetings, community forums, development and distribution of protocols, policies, tribal codes, PSAs, posters, brochures, fact sheets, etc.

Needs Assessment/Strategic Plan/Logic Model: Funding can be used for activities associated with conducting a needs assessment and developing a strategic plan and logic model, to include paying for contract services to help accomplish this required task.

Comprehensive Victim Assistance: Funding must be used to provide comprehensive victim assistance. Examples of allowable costs include: Case management: assessment of client needs, development of individualized service plans, assessment of eligibility for other public or community-based programs, safety planning, assistance with crime victim compensation claims, information and referral, documentation of services provided, and routine follow up to ensure that the victim’s needs are being addressed. Basic services: shelter/housing and sustenance, medical care, substance abuse treatment, dental care, mental health treatment, emergency mental health assessments, individual and group counseling, and interpreter/translator services. Victim advocacy and information about crime victims’ rights and services. Education/GED assistance and employment services. Transportation assistance. Life skills training: managing personal finances, self care, parenting classes. Emergency response: hotline services, call-forwarding systems, rotating on-call cell phones. Cultural and traditional practices: talking circles, healing ceremonies, gatherings for victims, survivors, family and community members, etc.

Travel: Airfare, lodging, and mileage reimbursement for meeting or training costs related to grant activities, including costs associated with DOJ-required training or meetings.

Equipment & Supplies: Purchase of new or enhancement of existing equipment/technology exclusively related to the enhancement or implementation of the victim assistance program. Costs may include computers, fax machines, printers, scanners, cameras, office furniture, equipment necessary to establish information-sharing database, leasing vehicles for use by program staff, small appliances and cleaning supplies for shelter, supplies necessary to create brochures, posters, fliers, resource manuals, materials for traditional arts and crafts, etc.

Training: Funding can be used to support training specific to victim assistance, training and technical assistance conferences, seminars, classes, and program staff professional development, etc.

4. What activities cannot be funded under the award?
Prevention- and construction-related costs are not allowed under this award.

5. Are grant deliverables subject to approval?
Yes, deliverables produced with grant funds must be reviewed and approved by OVC prior to the production and dissemination of said products. Examples of deliverables include: conferences, workshops, flyers, pamphlets, training curricula, etc.

6. Can Tribes apply for more than the designated award totals?
Applicants may apply for the approximate award amount of up to $450,000 covering a 3 year project period. DOJ has the discretion to negotiate the scope of work and budget with applicants prior to the awarding of a grant.

7. May the applicant designate which of the performance measures it wishes to address, or is the applicant expected to address all performance measures?
Applicants are expected to address all performance measures under this Program Area. They should describe their ability, through a formal process, to collect information related to the performance measures listed in the solicitation.

8. Are there budgetary restrictions? What restrictions pertain to personnel and fringe benefits?
If a position is supported with OVC funds, total costs associated with “salary and fringe benefits” may not exceed 50 percent of the federal grant amount under the Purpose Area. Additionally, if the applicant is (currently) funding a 1/2 time victim-related position with other federal funds, resources under Purpose Area 6 may complement that position as long as the applicant does not exceed the aforementioned stipulation. Match is not required.

9. Will OVC offer any technical assistance to grant recipients under this program?
Yes, OVC will partner with a technical assistance provider that will provide training and technical assistance to grant recipients via workshop(s) and ad hoc assistance.

10. If we are awarded a grant, will our Tribal government be subjected to monitoring, reporting, and evaluation requirements?
Federal regulations require that any financial assistance from the federal government be
monitored to ensure that those funds are spent properly. Awarded agencies will be
responsible for submitting periodic programmatic progress reports and quarterly federal financial reports.

OVC grant monitoring staff may take a number of monitoring approaches, such as site visits, and office-based grant reviews.

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9. Juvenile justice (OJJDP - Tribal Juvenile Accountability Discretionary Program)

1. What projects are supported under this Purpose Area?
This Purpose Area focuses on juvenile justice. Specific examples of activities include the following:

Staffing: Salary and fringe benefits for positions to support implementation of the program and oversee staff who provide direct assistance to youth participants; Consultant and contract services for professional support and for evaluation.

Equipment and Supplies: Computer hardware and software for Internet access and e-mail capability, cell phones, telephones, pagers, printers, fax machines, copiers, as needed for program implementation; General office supplies, postage, and other supplies necessary to create outreach materials such as posters, flyers, etc.

Construction and Operation: Costs to build, expand, renovate, or operate temporary or permanent juvenile correction, detention, or community corrections facilities. With respect to the cost of constructing juvenile detention or correctional facilities only, the federal share of a grant received under this Purpose Area may not exceed 50 percent of approved costs.

Travel: Airfare, lodging, and mileage reimbursement for meeting or training costs related to Purpose Area activities, including costs associated with DOJ-required training.

Strategic Planning: Comprehensive planning for Tribal justice systems to serve juveniles.

2. Are matching funds required?
Yes, matching funds are required. Purpose Area # 9 funds may not exceed 90 percent of total program costs, including any funds the recipient sets aside for program administration. The applicant must identify the source of the non-federal portion of the budget and how they will use match funds. Applicants may satisfy this match requirement with either cash or in-kind services.
In addition, if an award recipient uses Purpose Area # 9 funds to construct a permanent juvenile correctional facility, the recipient must meet a 50-percent match of the total project. Applicants may satisfy this match requirement with either cash or in-kind services.

Please go to www.tribaljusticeandsafety.gov for additional information about how to calculate matching funds.

3. How can I find out what costs are allowable/unallowable?
Please reference the OJP Financial Guide (www.ojp.gov/financialguide/index.htm) to determine whether program costs are allowable or unallowable.

4. What training and technical assistance requirements are associated with this award?
OJJDP requires all newly awarded grantees to attend a mandatory orientation meeting in Washington, DC, during year 1 of the project. OJJDP also requires grantees to attend an annual Tribal Grantee Regional Cluster Meeting in years 2 and 3 of the project.

In addition, in the first year of the project, OJJDP will provide newly-funded grantees mandatory, intensive training and technical assistance to help them develop a comprehensive strategic plan and the capacity to collect and utilize performance management and program evaluation data. This training and technical assistance includes a mandatory Strategic Planning Training in year 1 of the project. Within 8 months of the first year of the grantee’s project period (May 30, 2012), OJJDP will require the grantee to submit an approved comprehensive strategic plan to implement, monitor, and sustain project goals and objectives and that documents the achievement of designated milestones. Please see the solicitation for more information, including how these requirements impact the applicant’s budget.

5. What is the Purpose Area # 9 “trust fund” requirement”?
A Tribe that receives a grant under Purpose Area #7 must establish an interest-bearing trust fund to deposit program funds. A trust fund is defined as an interest-bearing account specifically designated for this Purpose Area. The recipient of grant funds must use the amounts in the trust fund (including interest) during a period not to exceed 36 months from the date of the award. Grant recipients may use trust funds for purposes within the scope of the approved program and for authorized program administration purposes.

To comply with the trust fund requirement, a recipient’s account must include the following features:

  • The account must earn interest.
  • The recipient must account for the federal award amount.
  • The recipient must account for the local match amount.
  • The recipient must account for the interest earned.

6. What are Purpose Area # 9 reporting requirements?
Grantees must submit a categorical assistance progress report (CAPR) through DOJ’s Grants Management System (GMS) (https://grants.ojp.usdoj.gov/ ) annually on November 30 for the period October 1 through September 30 of the previous year. They must also submit their performance measure data for this same period through the Data Collection Technical Assistance Tool - DCTAT (www.ojjdp-dctat.org/) and upload a copy of this report into GMS along with their CAPR

7. Under Purpose Area # 9, may youth 18 years of age or older receive services under the award?
No. Services may only be provided to juveniles who have not yet reached their 18th birthday.

8. Under Purpose Area # 9, may a Tribe implement a program for Native girls only?
A single-sex program or activity may be only be funded under this award if the recipient agrees to identify and refer any excluded individuals to, or provide them with, a comparable alternative program or service.

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10. Tribal youth program (OJJDP - Tribal Youth Program- TYP)

1. What projects can be supported under this Purpose Area?
The goal of this program is to provide juvenile delinquency prevention services and support the ability of Tribes to respond to, and care for, juvenile offenders; and to encourage the accountability of Tribal governments to prevent juvenile delinquency and respond to, and care for, juvenile offenders; and to engage in comprehensive strategic planning for Tribal justice systems to serve juveniles. Examples of activities included but not limited to are:

Staffing: Staffing and fringe benefits for positions to support implementation of program and oversee staff who provide direct assistance to youth participants.

Strategic Planning: Comprehensive planning for Tribal justice systems to serve juveniles.

Prevention/Intervention/Treatment: Prevention services to impact risk factors for delinquency, including risk factor identification, anti-gang education, youth gun violence reduction programs, truancy prevention programs, school dropout prevention programs, afterschool programs, and parenting education programs; Interventions for court-involved Tribal youth, including graduated sanctions, restitution, diversion, home detention, foster and shelter care, and mentoring; Alcohol and drug abuse prevention programs and prevention services including drug and/or alcohol education, counselors, drug testing, and screening; Mental health program services, including development of comprehensive screening tools, crisis intervention, intake assessments, therapeutic services for co-occurring mental health and substance abuse disorders, drug testing, fetal alcohol syndrome screening, counseling, referral services, and placement services; Engaging at-risk Tribal youth in activities centered on cultural preservation, land reclamation, or green/sustainable Tribal traditions focusing on Tribal youth with chronic truancy or at risk of dropping out of school; Development and implementation of trauma-informed systems of care for programs and services that address child protection issues and interventions that address the effects and issues of childhood trauma; Development and implementation of Tribal best practices and traditional healing methods to support Tribal youth; Prevention and intervention services to teach native girls culturally appropriate skills needed to resist substance abuse, prevent teen pregnancy, prevent sexual abuse, foster positive relationships with peers and adults, learn self-advocacy, and build pro-social skills.

Tribal Courts and Juvenile Detention Centers: Improvements to the Tribal juvenile justice system including the development and implementation of indigenous justice strategies, Tribal juvenile codes, Tribal youth courts, Tribal juvenile drug courts, intake assessments, advocacy programs, and gender-specific programming and enhancing juvenile probation services and/or reentry programs; Services for youth residing within Tribal juvenile detention centers or soon to be released from such a center such as risk and needs assessments, educational and vocational programming, mental health services, substance abuse programs, family strengthening, recreational activities, and extended reentry aftercare to help successfully reintegrate the youth into the Tribal community; Enhance existing data systems, advance green technology and environmentally sustainable activities, and improve reporting capacity; Implement, monitor, and maintain Tribal juvenile detention standards.

Tribal Law and Order Act (TLOA): Funding is available to be used for activities outlined in TLOA such as Tribal Action Plan-type strategic planning and necessary juvenile court enhancements to take advantage of the enhanced sentencing authority or juvenile code development.

Equipment: Computer hardware and software for Internet access and e-mail capability, cell phones, telephones, pagers, printers, fax machines, copiers, as needed for program implementation (Note: Applicants are encouraged to budget for one computer system with Internet access and e-mail capability, if one system is not already available); General office supplies, postage, and other supplies necessary to create outreach materials such as posters, flyers, etc.

Training: Consultant and contract services for professional support and expert knowledge to assist with the development/enhancement of the program, such as training, treatment, information technology, and evaluation; Mileage reimbursement, air travel, lodging, and per diem associated with mandatory training (see Part G, III).

Travel: Airfare, lodging, and mileage reimbursement associated with DOJ-required training.

2. What training and technical assistance requirements are associated with this award?
OJJDP requires all newly awarded grantees to attend a mandatory orientation meeting in Washington, DC, during year 1 of the project. OJJDP also requires grantees to attend an annual Tribal Grantee Regional Cluster Meeting in years 2 and 3 of the project.

In addition, in the first year of the project, OJJDP will provide newly-funded grantees mandatory, intensive training and technical assistance to help them develop a comprehensive strategic plan and the capacity to collect and utilize performance management and program evaluation data. This training and technical assistance includes a mandatory Strategic Planning Training in year 1 of the project. Within 8 months (May 30, 2012) of the first year of the grantee’s project period , OJJDP will require the grantee to submit an approved comprehensive plan to implement, monitor, and sustain project goals and objectives and that documents the achievement of designated milestones. Please see the solicitation for more information, including how these requirements impact the applicant’s budget.

3. Are matching funds required?
Matching funds are not required under Purpose Area # 10.

4. Under Purpose Area # 10, may youth 18 years of age or older receive services under the award?
No. Services may only be provided to juveniles who have not yet reached their 18th birthday.

5. Under Purpose Area # 10, may a Tribe implement a program for Native girls only?
A single-sex program or activity may be only be funded under this award if the recipient agrees to identify and refer any excluded individuals to, or provide them with, a comparable alternative program or service.

6. What are Purpose Area#10 Reporting Requirements?
Grantees must submit a categorical assistance progress report (CAPR) through DOJ’s Grants Management System (GMS) (https://grants.ojp.usdoj.gov/ ) semi-annually on January 30 and July 31 for the six month period preceding the due date. They must also submit their performance measure data semi-annually for this same period through the Data Collection Technical Assistance Tool - DCTAT (www.ojjdp-dctat.org/) and upload a copy of this report into GMS along with their CAPR.

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