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Training and Technical Assistance stay current on the Tribal TTA list across the Department

Overview:

The Department of Justice (DOJ) provides training and technical assistance (TTA) to further practical and specialized knowledge to implement and enhance justice system efforts. DOJ supports training and technical assistance that is both specifically geared toward tribes and across broader topic areas.

TTA Topics and Eligibility | TTA Providers | Grants and Financial Training | TTA Events

Topical TTA Resources and Eligibility

DOJ provides subject matter-based training and technical assistance across topic areas that include:

  • Indian Alcohol and Substance Abuse

    TTA resources are available to assist tribal communities in planning and implementing comprehensive strategies to reduce and control crime associated with alcohol and other drug abuse; and in developing, implementing, and enhancing American Indian and Alaska Native tribal justice systems. Services include community analysis, strategic planning, workshops, online tools, on-site technical assistance, multi-disciplinary training events, prescription drug monitoring assistance, and methamphetamine prevention opportunities.

  • Law Enforcement

    TTA resources are available assist tribal communities with proactively addressing the most serious Tribal law enforcement needs. The TTA services in the area of law enforcement are designed to increase the capacity of tribal law enforcement; enhance tribal law enforcement's capacity to prevent, solve and control crime, and engage in anti-methamphetamine activities; assist tribal communities with the implementation or enhancement of community policing strategies. Services include leadership training; anti-gang courses; training to combat methamphetamine production, distribution and use; tribal prescription drug abuse courses; prescription drug monitoring, and drug endangered children assistance.

  • Tribal Courts

    TTA resources are available to assist tribal communities with the developing, implementing, enhancing, and continuing the operation of tribal judicial systems. The TTA services in the area of tribal courts enables tribal courts to plan, implement, and enhance court services and programs that meet the unique needs of their respective communities. Services focus on topics that include but are not limited to multidisciplinary training and multi-jurisdictional training; problem-solving efforts; information sharing; healing to wellness courts; tribal legal code; judicial officer training; juvenile and family courts; and indigenous justice/peacemaking courts.

  • Tribal Civil and Criminal Legal Assistance

    TTA resources are available to 1) enhance the operations of tribal justice systems and improve access to those systems, and 2) provide training and technical assistance (TTA) for development and enhancement of tribal justice systems. The TTA services in the area of tribal civil and criminal assistance helps tribal communities with the provision of procedural justice in tribal civil and criminal legal procedures, legal infrastructure enhancements, public education, and TTA for the development and enhancement of tribal justice systems. Services focus on topics that include indigent defense services, civil legal assistance, public defender services, and strategies for implementing the enhanced sentencing authority under the Tribal Law and Order Act (TLOA).

  • Corrections, Alternatives to Incarceration, and Reentry

    TTA resources are available to assist tribes with the 1) identification of justice system needs and the planning process for renovating and constructing correctional facilities, multi-purpose justice centers, or correctional alternative facilities, and 2) development, implementation, or enhancement of community-based correctional alternatives to address the incarceration and rehabilitation of juvenile and adult offenders subject to tribal jurisdiction. Additionally, TTA resources are available to assist tribes with offender reentry programming efforts. Services focus on topics that include planning, renovating, and constructing correctional, correctional alternative facilities, halfway houses, and multi-purpose justice centers; enhancing community corrections capacity; implementing alternative to incarceration programs; and evidence-based practices for facilitating the community reintegration for offenders.

  • Juvenile Delinquency Prevention and Juvenile Justice

    TTA resources are available to assist tribal communities with developing and implementing programs that prevent juvenile delinquency, increase accountability for delinquent tribal youth, and strengthen tribal juvenile justice systems. TTA services in the area of juvenile justice are designed to increase American Indian/Alaska Native communities' skills and knowledge about programs and strategies, building tribes' capacity to develop effective and sustainable programs for reducing juvenile crime and increasing youth potential in tribal communities. Services focus on topics that include prevention and treatment, reentry, tribal juvenile detention centers, Alaska Native youth delinquency, tribal courts, and the Tribal Law and Order Act (TLOA) as it relates to juveniles.

  • Victim Services

    TTA resources are available to assist tribal communities with developing, enhancing, and sustaining a comprehensive victim assistance program that: 1) provides a coordinated collaborative multidisciplinary response to victims of crime, their families and community, and 2) provides trauma-informed, culturally competent holistic services to victims of crime, family, and community. Services focus on topics that include but are not limited to domestic violence, cybercrimes, stalking sexual assault, human trafficking, post-traumatic stress disorder, bullying, cultural responses to tribal victims, gang victimization, child abuse, and court room ethics for victim advocates.

  • Intergovernmental Collaboration

    TTA resources are available to increase awareness by tribal, state, and local government officials of the benefits of collaborative problem solving and planning and replicate promising practices for improving public safety in tribal communities through tribal, state, and local collaboration methods. TTA services in the area of tribal, state, and local collaboration are designed to promote collaborative work between tribal and state leaders aimed at enhancing collaboration on law enforcement and other criminal justice issues. Services focus on topics that include collaborative partnerships, understanding and developing mutual aid agreements, protocols for inter-jurisdictional relationships, protocols for conducting community corrections-related activities, full faith, and credit agreements.

  • Information Sharing

    TTA resources are available to assist tribal law enforcement and other tribal criminal justice practitioners with implementation and enhancement of justice Information sharing systems. TTA services in the area of information sharing are designed to assist tribes with crime data collection, reporting, and intelligence gathering. Services include crime data collection and reporting video tutorial for as it pertains to UCR or NIBRS, crime data collection and reporting training courses, and the Tribe and Territory Sex Offender Registry System (TTSORS).

  • Sex Offender Registration and Notification Act

    TTA resources are available to assist tribal jurisdictions with developing systems to substantially implement the Sex Offender Registration and Notification Act (SORNA). TTA services in the area of SORNA is available in a variety of formats, including local, regional and national training and conferences; subject-matter technical assistance, meeting facilitation, event planning, and support for strategic planning. Services focus on topics such as sex offender registration and management; community and Council buy-in, community notification and public education; team development and processes; relationship building; coordinating collection and submission to national databases; form development; code development/review; registration process/program; sustaining programs beyond grant funding; navigating resources available; and Tribe and Territory Sex Offender Registry System (TTSORS).

  • Domestic and Sexual Violence Crimes

    TTA resources are available to assist tribal communities with efforts to reduce violence against women and administer justice for and strengthen services to victims of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking. TTA services in the area of domestic and sexual violence crimes include training for victim advocates and tribal court judges, legal training on domestic and sexual violence, stalking, abuse of persons with disabilities, and effective responses to and prevention of sexual violence against American Indian/Alaska Native women.

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DOJ Tribal Training and Technical Assistance Providers

Click on the organization name to read a brief description of the agency, services provided, contact information, and a link to each organization's website.

Indian Alcohol and Substance Abuse

  • Fox Valley Technical College, National Criminal Justice Training Center

    DOJ Training area of focus: Law Enforcement, Community Analysis, Indian Alcohol and Substance Abuse, Tribal Probation

    About FVTC
    Fox Valley Technical College (FVTC) is one of the leading national trainers and educators in law enforcement today. Through its criminal justice centers and programs it has been delivering best-practice training and technical assistance since 1983. To better serve its customers including law enforcement, corrections and courts, FVTC recently reorganized these programs and centers of the college and structured them within the new National Criminal Justice Training Center (NCJTC). The programs implemented through NCJTC encompass federally funded training and technical assistance programs and services, contract and cost recovery training. Each operation within NCJTC specializes in a particular set of issues critical to the criminal justice field. The training and technical assistance programs are dedicated to improving the knowledge, skills, capability, capacity, and leadership potential of our nation's criminal justice professionals and systems.

    Services Provided
    The cornerstone of NCJTC's philosophy is reliance on community partnerships to develop strategies targeted to meet community challenges and needs. NCJTC conducts trainings that help the criminal justice community analyze needs, identify gaps and assets, and create community-based solutions that ensure ownership, pride, and sustainability.  Additionally, NCJTC provides TTA to tribes that are focusing on addressing alcohol and substance abuse efforts that are consistent with the scope of the Indian Alcohol and Substance Abuse program.

    NCJTC's earliest projects remain the cornerstone of the Center's work, including development of regional and national multi-jurisdictional and multi-disciplinary law enforcement training, courthouse safety and security, as well as community analysis as a precursor to effective justice system planning strategies. NCJTC takes pride in its close ties to the law enforcement community which enables Center staff to develop, promote, and deliver high-quality training and technical assistance programs that address today's diverse and challenging issues.

    The Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS) funds NCJTC to deliver Tribal Oriented Policing Strategies: A Community Policing Approach to Reducing Crime in Indian Country training course. This course was designed specifically for the Native American community policing practitioners. The training will demonstrate how to strengthen relationships between law enforcement, tribal agencies, and the community to improve quality of life and enhance the community safety, through community policing efforts.

    NCJTC Helping Communities

    Program Support
    • Peer-to-peer support (information exchange and mentoring for individuals and groups or with multiple jurisdictions)
    • Publication drafting and dissemination
    • Workshops and training events (agenda development, speaker identification, and logistical support)
    • Curriculum development

    Program Development
    • Diversion and prevention programs
    • Treatment and services for offenders and families
    • Resource development and grant writing strategies to promote sustainability

    Strategic Planning
    • Community development and assessment strategies
    • Capacity and team building

    Specialized Training Topical Areas
    • Tribal law enforcement
    • Tribal probation
    • Working with juvenile offenders
    • Gang awareness/Native youth gangs
    • Drug and alcohol identification and recognition
    • Restorative justice
    • Peacemaking
    • Community policing

    Additional conference and training opportunities include:
    • American Indian Justice Conference (AIJC)
    • Community Analysis Process for Planning Strategies (CAPPS)
    • Crimes Against Children in Indian Country Conference
    • Drugs: Identification, Recognition, and Legal Update Training
    • Highly Effective Grant Program Management Training
    • Multi-Jurisdictional Law Enforcement Conference
    • Native American Law Enforcement Summit (NALES)
    • Selling and Sustaining Your Program: Successful Grant Writing
    • Tribal Faculty Development
    • Tribal Probation Academy (TPA)

    Target Audience/Eligibility
    NCJTC offers services for federally recognized tribes to:

    • improve tribal justice and public safety programs through comprehensive planning;
    • create programs that prevent, address and reduce alcohol- and substance abuse related crime; and
    • assist tribal governments to build the capacity to operate alternatives to incarceration and community corrections (probation and/or parole programs).

    Tribes do not have to receive CTAS or other DOJ funding to be eligible for these TTA resources.

    Funding Agency(s)

    Bureau of Justice Assistance
    Office of Community Oriented Policing Services

    Contact Information:

    Rebecca Murdock, Program Manager
    P (920) 735-2517 | murdock@fvtc.edu

    Dawn Rall, Project Coordinator
    P (920) 225-5905 | rall@fvtc.edu

    Justine Souto, Project Specialist
    P (920) 993-5175 | souto@fvtc.edu

    Dave Raasch, Project Specialist
    P (920) 996-2973 | raasch@fvtc.edu

    Web www.fvtc.edu/tribal

  • National Alliance for Drug Endangered Children (National DEC)

    DOJ Training Area of Focus: Drug Endangered Children

    About National DEC
    The mission of the National Alliance for Drug Endangered Children (National DEC) is to break the cycle of abuse and neglect by empowering practitioners who work to transform the lives of children and families living in drug environments.  National DEC provides training and technical assistance to state DEC alliances and those in the community, who assist, and care for drug endangered children.

    National DEC works to strengthen community capacity by coordinating efforts with state and local alliances and by providing training and technical assistance. The organization also connects resources to practitioners through our Resource Center. Because of support from individuals, corporate partners, foundations, and governmental agencies, National DEC provides program assistance to communities across the nation.

    National DEC believes that success begins with identifying children at risk. Recognizing children as victims gives us all an opportunity to provide intervention. By working together and leveraging resources, National DEC can provide drug endangered children opportunities to live in safe and nurturing environments free from abuse and neglect.

    Services Provided
    NADEC is partnering with Lamar Associates to deliver the National Tribal Core Drug Endangered Children Training Program. This training is designed to coordinate and promote collaborative relationships between tribal jurisdiction stakeholders—including tribal justice systems, child welfare workers, educators, and others—that will focus on appropriate responses for cases involving drug endangered children.  National DEC provides training, technical assistance, an on-line Resource Center, monthly webinars, E-Update Newsletters, Tribal, State & Local DEC Alliance development & support, and convenes an annual national conference.

    Target Audience
    National DEC's mission of Children + Drugs = Risk applies to the work of all professionals with the opportunity to recognize a drug endangered child and the ability to make a difference in that child's life to break cycles of neglect & abuse.  Tribes do not have to receive CTAS or other DOJ funding to be eligible for these TTA resources.

    Contact Information:

    Chuck Noerenberg, President
    P (612) 860-1599 | cnoerenberg@nationaldec.org

    Lori Moriarty, Vice President
    P (303) 413-3066 | lmoriarty@nationaldec.org

    Susannah Carroll, Director DEC Network Services
    P (303) 413-3063 | scarroll@nationaldec.org

    Eric Nation, Training & Development Coordinator
    P (641) 521-7220 | enation@nationaldec.org

    Web: www.nationaldec.org

  • The Prescription Drug Monitoring Program (PDMP) Training and Technical Assistance Center (TTAC) at Brandeis University

    DOJ training area of focus: Public health, Substance Abuse, and Law Enforcement

    About the PDMP TTAC at Brandeis University
    Made possible through the partnership of the Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA) and the Heller School for Social Policy and Management at Brandeis University, the PDMP Training and Technical Assistance Center provides support, resources, and information to PDMPs, federal partners, organizations, and other stakeholders to further the efforts of PDMPs in curtailing prescription drug abuse and diversion while ensuring access to controlled medications for patients with legitimate medical need.  Training and technical assistance – tailored to unique program circumstances, and to states that may not yet have active programs – are now available through a single point of contact.

    Services Provided
    The primary purpose of the Harold Rogers Prescription Drug Monitoring Program (HRPDMP) is to enhance the capacity of regulatory and law enforcement agencies and public health officials to collect and analyze controlled substance prescription data and other scheduled chemical products through a centralized database administered by an authorized state agency. The program was created by the FY 2002 U.S. Department of Justice Appropriations Act (Public Law 107-77) and has received funding under each subsequent year's Appropriations Act.  The HRPDMP allows for states' discretion as they plan, implement, or enhance a PDMP to accommodate local decision-making based on state laws and preferences, while encouraging the replication of promising practices. In FY 2012, the program expanded to provide funding to federally-recognized Indian tribal governments for the specific purpose of enabling tribal health care providers to provide data to and access data contained within state PDMPs.

    The PDMP TTAC provides assistance with:

    • Developing policy and information for PDMPs
    • Collecting and reporting performance measurements
    • Hosting regional and national conferences
    • Participating in interstate data sharing
    • Planning/implementing new PDMPs

    Target Audience
    The PDMP TTAC provides TTA resources that are designed for law enforcement agencies and public health officials.  Resources are available to DOJ grantees and non-grantees.

    Contact Information:

    P 360-556-7152 | assist@pmpalliance.org

    Web http://pdmpassist.org/

  • Strategic Applications International

    Lamar Associates, LLC

    DOJ Training area of focus: Law Enforcement, Substance Abuse, and Juvenile Justice

    About Lamar Associates
    Lamar Associates is a full service solutions provider for investigations, law enforcement, security and emergency preparedness needs. From background checks and due diligence, to risk threat and crisis management, we have access to state-of-the-art technology and a team of elite law enforcement and security experts capable of meeting the most complex challenges in today’s unsettled environment. We offer modular, flexible and scalable solution for any size company or organization to address potentially harmful situations, whether natural, accidental or intentional. With integrated, comprehensive planning and implementation geared toward your specific needs, Lamar Associated will help you prepare for tomorrow while protecting today.

    Services Provided
    The company currently provides training and technical assistance services to the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) in the area of juvenile related topics such as the Tribal Law and Order Act and it’s relation to juvenile detention issues.

    Lamar Associates also provides services to the Office of Community Oriented Public Service (COPS) by providing twenty-two training opportunities to participate in the Tribal Prescription Drug Abuse and Drug Endangered Children Program with regional, webinar, and web-based online courses in the topics of Drug Endangered Children; Prescription Drug Abuse; Community Policing Concepts; and Problem Solving Strategies.   Pharmaceutical drug abuse in Indian Country has grown to become a significant public safety issue that has contributed to the increase in violent crime rates in Indian Country, devastated Native American families, endangered children, and created a strain on the limited resources available to tribal law enforcement and service programs. In order to address this serious public safety concern, Lamar Associates, LLC (Lamar), and its project partners, the National Indian Child Welfare Association and the National Association of Drug Diversion Investigators have been funded to develop the “Tribal Prescription Drug Endangered Children Training and Technical Assistance Program”. Lamar and its partners will develop a training curricula and provide technical assistance that will: 1) increase the capacity of law enforcement agencies to serve the needs of drug endangered children and 2) increase the capacity of law enforcement agencies to build partnerships with public health, prevention, and treatment providers that will lead to coordinated community responses to prevent prescription drug diversion and abuse. The training curriculum will be designed to acquaint the participants with: The Indian Child Welfare Act (25 U.S.C. 1901); civil and criminal jurisdiction in Indian Country; roles and responsibilities of service groups; types of reporting, cross-reporting, and information sharing; safety procedures for children, families, and responding personnel; accepted drug endangered children protocols; the national pharmaceutical drug assessments; the pharmaceutical impact in Indian Country including trends, signs of exposure in children, identification of drug user behavior and paraphernalia; identification drug contaminated environments; child risk assessment methodologies; community policing principles, problem-solving techniques, and strategic planning and collaboration with federal, state, private and tribal organizations. For additional information about the trainings and technical assistance that Lamar Associated provide, visit http://lamarassociates.net/indian-country-training.

    Program Support
    • Workshops and training events (agenda development, speaker identification, and logistical support)
    • Information exchange and mentoring for individuals and groups or with multiple jurisdictions)
    • Curriculum development
    • Online distance learning, webinars, etc.

    Strategic Planning
    • Community development and assessment strategies
    • Capacity and team building

    Specialized Training Topical Areas
    • Tribal law enforcement officer training
    • Emergency Preparedness
    • School Physical Security
    • Tribal Correctional Administrators training
    • Native Youth Gangs and Teen Sub-Culture Groups
    • Prescription Drug Abuse and Illicit Drug identification and prevention strategies
    • Community Policing

    Target Audience/Eligibility
    Lamar Associate’s primary target audience is federally recognized Native American and Alaskan Native tribes (“Tribes”) that have received grant funding through CTAS. Lamar Associates may also provide services to non-CTAS grant recipients if funding permits.

    DOJ Funding Agency(s)

    Office of Community Oriented Policing Services
    Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention

    Contact Information:

    P 202-543-8181 | info@lamarassociates.net

    Web www.lamarassociates.net

Law Enforcement

  • ICF International

    DOJ Training area of focus: Law Enforcement

    About ICFI
    ICF International is a management, technology, and policy consulting firm that was founded in 1969. Based in Fairfax, Virginia, ICF International partners with government and commercial clients to deliver professional services and technology solutions in the energy, environment, and infrastructure; health, social programs, and consumer/financial; and public safety and defense markets.  ICFs Research and Evaluation team helps clients develop measurable indicators, rigorous information collection, insightful performance analysis, and program effectiveness to drive informed decisions. 

    Services Provided
    Recognizing the need to help law enforcement agencies operationalize and measure performance in community policing implementation, the Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS), partnered with ICF International to develop, administer, and report on an online assessment tool.  Over the course of 8+ years, the COPS and ICF teams developed and refined the community policing definition and framework, developed the CP-SAT instrument, and administered the CP-SAT to hundreds of law enforcement agencies (LEA) nationwide. CP-SAT participants include sworn staff at all levels, civilian staff who work on community partnerships and/or problem solving, and representatives from community partner organizations who are knowledgeable about the agency and how it interacts with partners and the community. The ICF team analyzes CP-SAT performance data and develops a user-friendly summary report for each participating agency. The agency reports are intended to provide agencies with an overview of their community policing performance; identifying agency strengths and areas for improvement. The ICF and COPS partnership works to transform the COPS Office philosophy of community policing into practice.

    Target Audience/Eligibility
    The CP-SAT is currently available free of charge to Tribal law enforcement agencies (and is also a current grant requirement for COPS Hiring Program (CHP) grantees).

    DOJ Funding Agency(s)
    Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS)

    Contact Information:
    Beth Heinen, Project Manager
    Phone: (314) 918-0373
    Email: beth.heinen@icfi.com

    Web www.icfi.com

  • Western Community Policing Institute (WCPI)

    DOJ Training area of focus: Law Enforcement and Intergovernmental Collaboration
    About WCPI
    Western Community Policing Institute (WCPI) was established in 1996 as one of the national networks of Regional Community Policing Institutes (RCPI). Located on the campus of Western Oregon University in
    Monmouth, OR, WCPI maintains the highest standards of training development by delivering national training courses that adhere to the adult learning principles, including problem-based learning, effectiveness of law enforcement agencies, and the communities they serve.

    Services Provided
    WCPI provides national training and technical support on issues vital to community safety.
    Existing training topics include:

    • Homeland Security
    • Community Policing
    • Ethics
    • Crime Prevention
    • Weed and Seed
    • Tribal Youth Leadership
    • Tribal Policing
    • Developing Teams
    • Domestic Violence

    WCPI receives funding from the Office of Community Oriented Policing (COPS) to provide tribal-specific training, including those focused on youth, executive leadership, and regional collaboration (Tribal Youth Leadership, Tribal Inspired Leadership Training, and Regional Collaboration and Tribal Partnerships).

    Tribal Inspired Leadership Training (TILT): This course is designed to increase Tribal Leaders’ capacity to leverage community policing in responding to the effects of local economic distress on public safety, and increase their capacity to address unique issues in a culturally sensitive and comprehensive community policing approach.

    Tribal Youth Leadership (TYL): This training is devised to advance the practice of community policing as an effective strategy in a communities’ efforts to improve public safety. TYL is designed to train and equip American Indian youth (middle and high school level) with the leadership skills necessary to address the public safety problems that plague tribal communities.

    Regional Collaboration to Embrace, Engage, and Sustain Tribal Community Policing Partnerships: This course is designed to provide technical assistance and regional training that focuses on building effective and efficient collaborative partnerships throughout Indian Country to address the unique public safety threats to tribal communities and their neighboring jurisdictions.

    Tribal Community Police/Teams: This training is designed to bring together Tribal Government, community members, and law enforcement in order to learn techniques on how to empower their communities to ethically identify and solve community problems through the use of community policing concepts, advocacy, and problem solving

    Also, WCPI receives from BJA to provide a proactive, comprehensive, and user-friendly BJA tribal training and technical assistance program that fosters collaboration among tribal, state, federal, and local governments.  TTA will focus on assisting tribes and or state, federal, and local governments in building collaborative partnerships, understanding and developing mutual aid agreements, protocols for inter-jurisdictional relationships, protocols for conducting community corrections-related activities, full faith, credit agreements, and any other associated activities.  TTA will also include core strategies or themes for developing collaborative tribal partnerships, team building, increasing coordination and communication among federal, state, tribal and local governmental agencies, and how to integrate and respect rich community values of tribal cultures.

    Target Audience/Eligibility
    WCPI’s primary target audience is federally recognized Native American and Alaskan Native tribes (“Tribes”) that have received grant funding through CTAS.  The target audience may include:

    • Public safety personnel
    • Governmental and non-governmental organizations
    • School and postsecondary education officials
    • Medical professionals
    • Tribal leaders
    • Community members

    Training and Technical assistance is not limited to tribes that have been awarded federal grants such as CTAS.

    DOJ Funding Agency(s)
    Bureau of Justice Assistance
    Office of Community Oriented Policing Services

    Contact Information:

    Brian Kaufman, Executive Director
    P (503) 751-4008 | kauffmab@wou.edu

    Ashley Jackson, Administrative Assistant
    P (503) 751-4011 | jacksona@wou.edu

    Web www.westernrcpi.com

    Web www.tribaltraining.com

  • Upper Midwest Community Policing Institute (UMCPI)

    DOJ Training area of focus: Law Enforcement

    About UMCPI
    The Upper Midwest Community Policing Institute (UMCPI) is a 501(c) (3) non-profit organization dedicated to enhancing the effectiveness of law enforcement agencies and the communities they serve.
    The organization is a Regional Center for Public Safety Innovation with a comprehensive understanding of public safety agency's organizational structures, culture, demands, and governmental and public responsibilities. UMCPI's main goal is to enhance the effectiveness of public safety agencies by providing agencies with the tools necessary to help them achieve their goals. The nature of providing public safety at all levels is changing rapidly including the need to become more accountable in the way public safety agencies work and the services they provide as well as continually adapting and learning in order to respond to changes in environment. For many public safety organizations this process includes a growing need to connect more effectively with the communities they serve.

    Services Provided
    UMCPI provides customized training, mentoring, coaching and technical assistance that focuses on
    building leadership capacity, fostering team development, and supporting positive change. UMCPI offers a set of training curricula for Native American settings. Using popular COPS Office publications, UMCPI has developed an innovative and culturally acceptable set of training, tools, and materials that will provide valuable community policing information to Native American law enforcement agencies and their community partners. Through consultation with subject matter experts, UMCPI developed the Native American Training Series Phase I, Phase II, and Phase III. Phase I includes topics such as Domestic Violence, Graffiti, Community Policing Basics, Disorderly Youth, Problem Solving, Underage Drinking and Community Engagement. Phase II curriculum includes School Safety; Early Intervention Systems; School Crime Issues; School Resource Officers, Gangs and Bullying and Harassment in Schools. Phase III includes topics such as executive leadership, leadership skills, traits and accountability; executive leadership in a negative culture, leadership and conflict resolution, team leadership, leading systematic change, leading in a community policing environment, development of a personal leadership growth plan, and development of organizational leadership growth plan. Visit www.umcpi.org for more details on any of the training events.

    Target Audience/Eligibility
    UMCPI offers uniquely designed programs for policing agencies facing the challenges of managing and leading in today's rapidly changing environments, with a special focus on tribal policing.  Training and Technical assistance is not limited to tribes that have been awarded federal grants such as CTAS.

    DOJ Funding Agency(s)

    Office of Community Oriented Policing Services

    Contact Information:

    Dennis Cusick, Executive Director
    P (651) 917-2259 | dcusick@umcpi.org

    Web www.umcpi.org

  • Strategic Applications International

    DOJ Training area of focus: Law Enforcement and Substance Abuse

    About SAI
    Strategic Applications International (SAI) offers a variety of cutting edge services to its clients from comprehensive strategic planning to government relations.  Located in our nation’s capital, and with a team of consultants with years of experience on Capitol Hill, SAI is in a unique position to represent the interests of local and state government, non-profits, and faith-based organizations. Currently, SAI represents a variety of state and local government organizations, faith-based ministries, and several non-profits in their efforts to acquire Federal funding to support initiatives in law enforcement, housing, mentoring, drug courts, and work with those reentering our communities from incarceration.

    Services Provided
    The COPS Tribal Meth Initiative Training and Technical Assistance Project works with Tribal Meth Grantees to build their capacity to implement the three community policing pillars of Partnerships, Problem Solving, and Organizational Transformation, to reduce methamphetamine production, distribution, and use.  Strategic Applications International’s (SAI) use of a culturally sensitive training and technical assistance model based on mutual learning, indigenous leadership development through the Tribal Meth Fellows, the formation of multi-disciplinary teams to problem solve key issues using community policing principles, and the use of a community-led assessment model provide the COPS Office with a powerful support system for the Tribal Meth Grantees.  Please visit http://www.methpedia.org for more details.

    Target Audience/Eligibility
    SAI’s primary target audience is federally recognized Native American and Alaskan Native tribes (“Tribes”) that have received grant funding through CTAS. SAI may provide services to non-CTAS grant recipients if funding permits.

    DOJ Funding Agency(s)
    Office of Community Oriented Policing (COPS)
    Contact Information:

    P (202) 457-7771| ccopple@sai-dc.com

    Web www.methpedia.org

  • National Gang Center

    DOJ Training area of focus: Gangs
    About the National Gang Center
    The National Gang Center Web site features the latest research about gangs; descriptions of evidence-based, anti-gang programs; and links to tools, databases, and other resources to assist in developing and implementing effective community-based gang prevention, intervention, and suppression strategies. Visitors can read and download publications related to street gangs. An online form allows communities to request training and technical assistance as they plan and implement anti-gang strategies. Users can register for a variety of anti-gang training courses. The Web site also hosts a database of gang-related state legislation and municipal codes; a list of newspaper articles on nationwide gang activity, updated daily; and GANGINFO, an electronic mailing list for professionals working with gangs. For a list of all resources on this Web site, see Index to Site Content.

    Services Provided
    The National Gang Center offers four classes for law enforcement—Gangs in Indian Country, Basic Training for Street Gang Investigators, Gang Unit Supervision, and an Anti-Gang Seminar for Law
    Enforcement Chief Executives. These classes are provided on a regional basis to include participants from all law enforcement agencies (police and sheriff) within a geographical region.

    Gangs in Indian Country: In this three-day class, participants are provided with basic information about various gangs throughout the United States and receive specific, in-depth information about national and regional Native American gangs. Training topics include gang intelligence collection, investigative techniques, interviewing techniques, suppression strategies, and legal considerations in prosecuting gang crimes. For more information visit: http://www.nationalgangcenter.gov/Training-and-Technical-Assistance/Gangs-in-Indian-Country

    Basic Training for Street Gang Investigators: In this 3½-day class, participants are provided with basic information about the different types of gangs throughout the United States and receive specific, in-depth information about gangs in their region. They will learn about collecting gang intelligence, interviewing techniques, investigative techniques, suppression strategies, case-building strategies, and legal considerations in prosecuting gang crimes. http://www.nationalgangcenter.gov/Training-and-Technical-Assistance/Street-Gang-Investigators

    Gang Unit Supervision: This two-day class will enable participants to discuss and apply fundamental principles of effective gang unit supervision. Through the review and evaluation of best practice strategies, participants will be better prepared to develop the most appropriate organizational and management strategies for their department's gang unit. The information presented is applicable to participants who are forming new gang units as well as those operating existing gang units and multijurisdictional partnerships. For more information visit: http://www.nationalgangcenter.gov/Training-and-Technical-Assistance/Gang-Unit-Supervision

    Anti-Gang Seminar for Law Enforcement Chief Executives: This one-day seminar will allow police chiefs, sheriffs, and other law enforcement chief executives to discuss a variety of gang-related topics relevant to law enforcement executives. It is designed to be a collegial, facilitated event in which the participants' experiences are shared and constitute the educational value. Through discussions, brief scenario-based exercises, and shared resources, participants will learn from their peers while sharing their own experiences. For more information visit: http://www.nationalgangcenter.gov/Training-and-Technical-Assistance/Chief-Executives

    Additionally, the National Gang Center receives funding from the Office of Juvenile Delinquency Prevention to offer training and training in regard to the OJJDP Comprehensive Gang Model.  Visitors to the website will find an online overview that provides a 23-minute overview of the Model for individuals exploring strategies to assess and address their communities' gang problems. Key concepts covered include a brief overview of the nation's gang problem, a discussion of theory behind the Model and its five core strategies, a discussion on assessing the gang problem, and tools to assist community leaders in implementing the Model in their communities

    Target Audience/Eligibility
    The National Gang Center Offers training courses and resources that are designed for law enforcement officials such as police, sheriffs, and prosecutors.  Resources are available to DOJ grantees and non-grantees.

    DOJ Funding Agency(s)

    Bureau of Justice Assistance
    Office of Juvenile Delinquency and Prevention

    Contact Information:

    P (850) 385-0600| information@nationalgangcenter.gov

    Web www.nationalgangcenter.gov

  • Lamar Associates, LLC

    DOJ Training area of focus: Law Enforcement, Substance Abuse, and Juvenile Justice

    About Lamar Associates
    Lamar Associates is a full service solutions provider for investigations, law enforcement, security and emergency preparedness needs. From background checks and due diligence, to risk threat and crisis management, we have access to state-of-the-art technology and a team of elite law enforcement and security experts capable of meeting the most complex challenges in today’s unsettled environment. We offer modular, flexible and scalable solution for any size company or organization to address potentially harmful situations, whether natural, accidental or intentional. With integrated, comprehensive planning and implementation geared toward your specific needs, Lamar Associated will help you prepare for tomorrow while protecting today.

    Services Provided
    The company currently provides training and technical assistance services to the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) in the area of juvenile related topics such as the Tribal Law and Order Act and it’s relation to juvenile detention issues.

    Lamar Associates also provides services to the Office of Community Oriented Public Service (COPS) by providing twenty-two training opportunities to participate in the Tribal Prescription Drug Abuse and Drug Endangered Children Program with regional, webinar, and web-based online courses in the topics of Drug Endangered Children; Prescription Drug Abuse; Community Policing Concepts; and Problem Solving Strategies.   Pharmaceutical drug abuse in Indian Country has grown to become a significant public safety issue that has contributed to the increase in violent crime rates in Indian Country, devastated Native American families, endangered children, and created a strain on the limited resources available to tribal law enforcement and service programs. In order to address this serious public safety concern, Lamar Associates, LLC (Lamar), and its project partners, the National Indian Child Welfare Association and the National Association of Drug Diversion Investigators have been funded to develop the “Tribal Prescription Drug Endangered Children Training and Technical Assistance Program”. Lamar and its partners will develop a training curricula and provide technical assistance that will: 1) increase the capacity of law enforcement agencies to serve the needs of drug endangered children and 2) increase the capacity of law enforcement agencies to build partnerships with public health, prevention, and treatment providers that will lead to coordinated community responses to prevent prescription drug diversion and abuse. The training curriculum will be designed to acquaint the participants with: The Indian Child Welfare Act (25 U.S.C. 1901); civil and criminal jurisdiction in Indian Country; roles and responsibilities of service groups; types of reporting, cross-reporting, and information sharing; safety procedures for children, families, and responding personnel; accepted drug endangered children protocols; the national pharmaceutical drug assessments; the pharmaceutical impact in Indian Country including trends, signs of exposure in children, identification of drug user behavior and paraphernalia; identification drug contaminated environments; child risk assessment methodologies; community policing principles, problem-solving techniques, and strategic planning and collaboration with federal, state, private and tribal organizations. For additional information about the trainings and technical assistance that Lamar Associated provide, visit http://lamarassociates.net/indian-country-training.

    Program Support
    • Workshops and training events (agenda development, speaker identification, and logistical support)
    • Information exchange and mentoring for individuals and groups or with multiple jurisdictions)
    • Curriculum development
    • Online distance learning, webinars, etc.

    Strategic Planning
    • Community development and assessment strategies
    • Capacity and team building

    Specialized Training Topical Areas
    • Tribal law enforcement officer training
    • Emergency Preparedness
    • School Physical Security
    • Tribal Correctional Administrators training
    • Native Youth Gangs and Teen Sub-Culture Groups
    • Prescription Drug Abuse and Illicit Drug identification and prevention strategies
    • Community Policing

    Target Audience/Eligibility
    Lamar Associate’s primary target audience is federally recognized Native American and Alaskan Native tribes (“Tribes”) that have received grant funding through CTAS. Lamar Associates may also provide services to non-CTAS grant recipients if funding permits.

    DOJ Funding Agency(s)

    Office of Community Oriented Policing Services
    Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention

    Contact Information:

    P 202-543-8181 | info@lamarassociates.net

    Web www.lamarassociates.net

  • The Prescription Drug Monitoring Program (PDMP) Training and Technical Assistance Center (TTAC) at Brandeis University

    DOJ training area of focus: Public health, Substance Abuse, and Law Enforcement

    About the PDMP TTAC at Brandeis University
    Made possible through the partnership of the Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA) and the Heller School for Social Policy and Management at Brandeis University, the PDMP Training and Technical Assistance Center provides support, resources, and information to PDMPs, federal partners, organizations, and other stakeholders to further the efforts of PDMPs in curtailing prescription drug abuse and diversion while ensuring access to controlled medications for patients with legitimate medical need.  Training and technical assistance – tailored to unique program circumstances, and to states that may not yet have active programs – are now available through a single point of contact.

    Services Provided
    The primary purpose of the Harold Rogers Prescription Drug Monitoring Program (HRPDMP) is to enhance the capacity of regulatory and law enforcement agencies and public health officials to collect and analyze controlled substance prescription data and other scheduled chemical products through a centralized database administered by an authorized state agency. The program was created by the FY 2002 U.S. Department of Justice Appropriations Act (Public Law 107-77) and has received funding under each subsequent year's Appropriations Act.  The HRPDMP allows for states' discretion as they plan, implement, or enhance a PDMP to accommodate local decision-making based on state laws and preferences, while encouraging the replication of promising practices. In FY 2012, the program expanded to provide funding to federally-recognized Indian tribal governments for the specific purpose of enabling tribal health care providers to provide data to and access data contained within state PDMPs.

    The PDMP TTAC provides assistance with:

    • Developing policy and information for PDMPs
    • Collecting and reporting performance measurements
    • Hosting regional and national conferences
    • Participating in interstate data sharing
    • Planning/implementing new PDMPs

    Target Audience
    The PDMP TTAC provides TTA resources that are designed for law enforcement agencies and public health officials.  Resources are available to DOJ grantees and non-grantees.

    Contact Information:

    P 360-556-7152 | assist@pmpalliance.org

    Web http://pdmpassist.org/

  • Fox Valley Technical College, National Criminal Justice Training Center

    DOJ Training area of focus: Law Enforcement, Community Analysis, Indian Alcohol and Substance Abuse, Tribal Probation

    About FVTC
    Fox Valley Technical College (FVTC) is one of the leading national trainers and educators in law enforcement today. Through its criminal justice centers and programs it has been delivering best-practice training and technical assistance since 1983. To better serve its customers including law enforcement, corrections and courts, FVTC recently reorganized these programs and centers of the college and structured them within the new National Criminal Justice Training Center (NCJTC). The programs implemented through NCJTC encompass federally funded training and technical assistance programs and services, contract and cost recovery training. Each operation within NCJTC specializes in a particular set of issues critical to the criminal justice field. The training and technical assistance programs are dedicated to improving the knowledge, skills, capability, capacity, and leadership potential of our nation's criminal justice professionals and systems.

    Services Provided
    The cornerstone of NCJTC's philosophy is reliance on community partnerships to develop strategies targeted to meet community challenges and needs. NCJTC conducts trainings that help the criminal justice community analyze needs, identify gaps and assets, and create community-based solutions that ensure ownership, pride, and sustainability.  Additionally, NCJTC provides TTA to tribes that are focusing on addressing alcohol and substance abuse efforts that are consistent with the scope of the Indian Alcohol and Substance Abuse program.

    NCJTC's earliest projects remain the cornerstone of the Center's work, including development of regional and national multi-jurisdictional and multi-disciplinary law enforcement training, courthouse safety and security, as well as community analysis as a precursor to effective justice system planning strategies. NCJTC takes pride in its close ties to the law enforcement community which enables Center staff to develop, promote, and deliver high-quality training and technical assistance programs that address today's diverse and challenging issues.

    The Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS) funds NCJTC to deliver Tribal Oriented Policing Strategies: A Community Policing Approach to Reducing Crime in Indian Country training course. This course was designed specifically for the Native American community policing practitioners. The training will demonstrate how to strengthen relationships between law enforcement, tribal agencies, and the community to improve quality of life and enhance the community safety, through community policing efforts.

    NCJTC Helping Communities

    Program Support
    • Peer-to-peer support (information exchange and mentoring for individuals and groups or with multiple jurisdictions)
    • Publication drafting and dissemination
    • Workshops and training events (agenda development, speaker identification, and logistical support)
    • Curriculum development

    Program Development
    • Diversion and prevention programs
    • Treatment and services for offenders and families
    • Resource development and grant writing strategies to promote sustainability

    Strategic Planning
    • Community development and assessment strategies
    • Capacity and team building

    Specialized Training Topical Areas
    • Tribal law enforcement
    • Tribal probation
    • Working with juvenile offenders
    • Gang awareness/Native youth gangs
    • Drug and alcohol identification and recognition
    • Restorative justice
    • Peacemaking
    • Community policing

    Additional conference and training opportunities include:
    • American Indian Justice Conference (AIJC)
    • Community Analysis Process for Planning Strategies (CAPPS)
    • Crimes Against Children in Indian Country Conference
    • Drugs: Identification, Recognition, and Legal Update Training
    • Highly Effective Grant Program Management Training
    • Multi-Jurisdictional Law Enforcement Conference
    • Native American Law Enforcement Summit (NALES)
    • Selling and Sustaining Your Program: Successful Grant Writing
    • Tribal Faculty Development
    • Tribal Probation Academy (TPA)

    Target Audience/Eligibility
    NCJTC offers services for federally recognized tribes to:

    • improve tribal justice and public safety programs through comprehensive planning;
    • create programs that prevent, address and reduce alcohol- and substance abuse related crime; and
    • assist tribal governments to build the capacity to operate alternatives to incarceration and community corrections (probation and/or parole programs).

    Tribes do not have to receive CTAS or other DOJ funding to be eligible for these TTA resources.

    Funding Agency(s)

    Bureau of Justice Assistance
    Office of Community Oriented Policing Services

    Contact Information:

    Rebecca Murdock, Program Manager
    P (920) 735-2517 | murdock@fvtc.edu

    Dawn Rall, Project Coordinator
    P (920) 225-5905 | rall@fvtc.edu

    Justine Souto, Project Specialist
    P (920) 993-5175 | souto@fvtc.edu

    Dave Raasch, Project Specialist
    P (920) 996-2973 | raasch@fvtc.edu

    Web www.fvtc.edu/tribal

Tribal Courts

  • University of North Dakota School of Law, Tribal Judicial Institute

    DOJ Training area of focus: Courts and Tribal Law

    About UND
    The University of North Dakota (UND) School of Law established the Tribal Judicial Institute (TJI) in 1993 with an award from a private foundation, to provide training and technical assistance to twenty tribal courts in North Dakota, South Dakota and Minnesota. The University of North Dakota School of Law is a leader amidst law schools in the advancement of tribal legal studies through established curricula and through the implementation of an Indian Law Certificate Program that is offered to J.D. candidates. Since its inception and with the support of the School of Law, the Institute has expanded to become a national institute and has conducted over 500 local, regional and national training sessions. In 1998, the Institute became one of the initial grantees of the Bureau of Justice Assistance under BJA's Tribal Court Assistance Program (TCAP).

    Services Provided
    The Tribal Judicial Institute (TJI) provides a wide variety of services as a training and technical assistance provider. The Institute plans and delivers conferences and trainings to national, regional and local audiences. In the more than 20 years that the Institute has been involved with tribal justice system development and education, efforts have focused upon both multidisciplinary training and multi-jurisdictional training on such topics as:

    • tribal court planning and implementation
    • specialty court planning and implementation
    • diversionary court planning and implementation
    • tribal constitution, code, and ordinance development
    • trial skills for tribal prosecutors and lay advocates
    • judicial development and enhancement
    • juvenile justice
    • indigenous justice/peacemaking
    • violence against native women and children
    • juvenile offenders
    • child protection and ICWA
    • elder abuse
    • criminal offenders and criminal justice systems including sentencing alternatives, diversionary courts and multidisciplinary approaches
    • sex offender registration and notification
    • court clerk and court administrator certification training
    • grant administration
    • child support enforcement programs
    • tribal drug courts
    • Tribal Law and Order Act compliance training

    The Institute also provides on-site services as well as distance-based technical assistance services to support tribes. Examples of such services include but are not limited to:

    • court/justice system assessments
    • legal research for court personnel and justice system planners
    • individualized training to support tribal justice system planning, implementation or enhancement
    • code and policy drafting

    Target Audience/Eligibility
    Existing project funding enables the Tribal Judicial Institute to provide training, technical or education services to federally recognized tribes, individuals employed by federally recognized tribes, and officials working across jurisdictional boundaries including but not limited to:

    • Tribal leaders and elected officials
    • Tribal judges and peacekeepers
    • Tribal prosecutors
    • Tribal Attorneys
    • Tribal Probation and Parole
    • Court Advocates
    • Victim Advocates
    • State/Federal justice system officials

    Contact Information:

    BJ Jones, Director
    P (701) 777-6176 | jones@law.und.edu

    Michelle Rivard Parks, Assistant Director
    P (701) 777-6192 | mrivard@law.und.edu

    Melissa Aaker, Administrative Assistant
    P (701) 777-6306 | maaker@law.und.edu

    Web www.law.und.edu/TJI

  • Center for Court Innovation

    DOJ Training area of focus: Tribal Courts and Interagency Collaboration
    About CCI
    The Center for Court Innovation is a non-profit think tank dedicated to justice system reform. Since 1993, the Center has helped design and implement strategies for improving the performance of justice systems nationally and internationally. The Center currently operates more than a dozen demonstration projects, each of which is experimenting with new solutions to difficult problems like addiction, mental illness, delinquency, domestic violence, and community disorder. What unites all of these projects is an underlying philosophy known as problem-solving justice. This is the idea that the justice system should do more than simply process cases, it should actively seek to address the problems that bring people to court. The Center's Tribal Justice Exchange provides technical assistance to tribal communities seeking to develop or enhance their tribal court systems. Funded by the Bureau of Justice Assistance's Tribal Courts Assistance Program, the Tribal Justice Exchange has three major goals:

    • Ensuring that tribal communities have access to training and ongoing technical assistance about problem-solving community-based practices.
    • Encouraging formal collaborations between traditional tribal justice systems and state and local court systems.
    • Identifying and disseminating best practices developed in Indian Country that could help strengthen public safety initiatives elsewhere in the United States.
    • The Tribal Justice Exchange offers a range of services designed to meet these goals.

    Services Provided

    Technical Assistance Site Visits
    The Tribal Justice Exchange provides onsite needs assessments to assist tribal communities in developing community-based problem solving strategies to meet local needs. Program staff work directly with tribal representatives to help identify the tribe's concerns and assist in the creation of a plan for addressing those concerns in a way that builds upon local resources, strengths, and traditions.

    Demonstration Projects
    Through the Tribal Justice Exchange, tribes are able to visit the Center's demonstration projects in the New York City area, including the award-winning Red Hook Community Justice Center and the Midtown Community Court. Each of the Center's demonstration projects is a real world experiment that offers visitors the opportunity to see problem-solving justice in action. For more information about the Center's demonstration projects, visit the Center's website, www.courtinnovation.org/tribal.

    Information Sharing
    The Tribal Justice Exchange is committed to promoting communication and information sharing among tribal and non-tribal justice systems. Program staff will work with tribal justice experts from across the country to produce a series of briefing papers addressing timely issues in tribal justice, including strategies for incorporating traditional tribal justice practices into state justice systems. These papers will be available free of charge on the Center for Court Innovation website.

    Tribal Access to Justice Innovation Project (TAJI)
    In FY 2012, CCI received funding to launch the Tribal Access to Justice Innovation Project (TAJI).  TAJI will enhance the ability of tribal justice practitioners to access information about innovative, culturally informed tribal court practices that are being used by other tribes across the country by launching a new initiative.  One of the main goals of this project is to disseminate practical, practitioner-friendly information about promising practices in tribal justice systems. 

    Target Audience
    The Tribal Justice Exchange is available to provide individualized technical assistance to tribal communities throughout the United States. Technical assistance is not limited to tribes that have been awarded federal grants. The Tribal Justice Exchange works with justice system professionals and those whose work intersects with the justice system. This includes judges, court staff, prosecutors, defense attorneys, court advocates, law enforcement, probation, parole, and pretrial services, as well as substance abuse treatment providers, victim services, job training programs, education institutions, and more.

    Funding Agency(s)

    Bureau of Justice Assistance

    Contact Information:

    Aaron Arnold, Director
    Tribal Justice Exchange
    P (315) 671-2094 | arnolda@courtinnovation.org

    Brett Taylor, Deputy Director
    National Technical Assistance
    P (646) 386-4463 | taylorb@courtinnovation.org

    Web www.courtinnovation.org/tribal

  • Tribal Law & Policy Institute

    DOJ Training area of focus: Healing to Wellness Courts

    About TLPI
    The Tribal Law and Policy Institute (TLPI) is a 100% Native American owned and operated corporation which was established in 1996 to design and deliver education, research, training, and technical assistance programs which promote the improvement of justice in Indian Country and the health, well-being and culture of Native peoples. TLPI’s vision is to empower Native communities to create and control their own institutions for the benefit/welfare of all community members now and for future generations. TLPI’s mission is to enhance and strengthen tribal sovereignty and justice while honoring community values, protecting rights, and promoting well-being. For more information on TLPI’s approach and philosophy, visit www.tribal-institute.org/lists/vision.htm. TLPI has established a comprehensive website (“Tribal Court Clearinghouse”) in the 1990s which serves as a resource for American Indian and Alaska Native Nations, tribal justice systems, tribal law enforcement, and others involved in the improvement of justice in Indian Country (www.tlpi.org). TLPI also maintains a series of other web-based publications and resources. For access to TLPI’s online resource publication library, visit www.tribal-institute.org/lists/pubs.htm.

    Services Provided
    LPI provides training and technical assistance services under two BJA grant programs. TLPI’s Tribal Healing to Wellness Court program includes Tribal Healing to Wellness Court on-site technical assistance, enhancement training, and publications. TLPI’s Tribal Court Collaboration Program includes expanded Walking on Common Ground website, Promising Practices resources, Tribal Legal Studies textbooks, and Tribal Legal Code resources.

    Tribal Wellness Courts Training and Technical Assistance (T/TA) Services
    TLPI provides Training and Technical Assistance (T/TA) services for Tribal Healing to Wellness (Drug) Courts including:

    • On-Site Technical Assistance for Tribal Healing to Wellness Courts
    • Tribal Healing to Wellness Court Enhancement Training
    • Tribal Healing to Wellness Court, and publications including
    • Tribal Healing to Wellness Courts: Needs Assessment Report (2010)
    • Tribal Healing to Wellness Courts: Overview of Tribal Drug Courts (revised and updated version available Fall 2011)
    • Tribal Healing to Wellness Courts: The Key Components (revised and updated version available Fall 2011)
    • Tribal Healing to Wellness Courts: Program Policies, Procedures, and Code Provisions (available Fall 2011)
    • Tribal Healing to Wellness Courts: Treatment Guidelines for Adults and Juveniles (available Spring 2012)
    • Tribal Healing to Wellness Courts: The Judges Bench Book (available Spring 2012)

    Walking on Common Ground
    TLPI is currently transforming the WalkingOnCommonGround.org website into an on-going permanent comprehensive resource highlighting tribal state collaboration - especially tribal state court collaborations and forums - and providing resources for those who wish to replicate. The site will be searchable by state (and tribe)
    through various methods including an interactive map.

    Promising Practices Publications/Resources
    TLPI is in the process of developing both hard copy and online promising practices resources concerning (1) Tribal-State Court collaborations; and (2) Public Law 280 collaborations. Tentative publication date for both publications is Fall 2011.

    Tribal Legal Studies Textbooks
    TLPI has developed a series of Tribal Legal Studies publication/textbook resources including:
    • Introduction to Tribal Legal Studies (2nd Edition)
    • Tribal Criminal Law and Procedure
    • Sharing Our Stories of Survival
    Instructor Guides are also being developed for all three publications.

    Tribal Legal Code Resources
    TLPI has developed a series of Tribal Legal Code resource publications/textbook resources including:
    • Tribal Legal Code Resource: Crimes Against Children
    • Tribal Legal Code Resource: Civil Child Welfare Laws (available summer 2011)

    Target Audience/Eligibility
    The target audience is American Indian and Alaska Native nations and others interested in promoting the improvement of justice in Indian Country and the health, well-being and culture of Native peoples. Training and Technical assistance is not limited to tribes that have been awarded federal grants such as CTAS.

    Contact Information:

    P (323) 650-5467 | info@tlpi.org

    Web www.tlpi.org

  • The National Tribal Judicial Center at The National Judicial College

    DOJ TTA area of focus:  Courts

    About NTJC
    In 2002, The National Judicial College (NJC) established the National Tribal Judicial Center (NTJC), a division of the College designed to address the special needs of tribal judiciaries and justice systems. NTJC has become an integral part of NJC, a well-respected and nationally acclaimed institution that has been educating judges for 50 years.  In 2010, NTJC became the lead Tribal Courts Assistance Program (TCAP) Technical Assistance Program provider for BJA.  NTJC is privileged to continue to work in partnership with tribal technical assistance partners across the nation, especially the Tribal Judicial Institute at the University of North Dakota and the National Criminal Justice Training Center at Fox Valley Technical College.

    Services Provided
    NTJC offers national education and training programs specifically designed for tribal judicial officers, court staff, and other justice system personnel. NTJC has modified several courses to address a more holistic approach to teaching tribal justice systems. The goal is to obtain more interagency cooperation at the tribal level for those cases involving families and individuals facing situations of domestic violence, drug and alcohol abuse and other problem solving areas. NTJC has a dedicated staff, solely focused on providing innovative, professional and culturally relevant educational experiences for tribal judges and court personnel.  NTJC provides in-person courses, a web-based curricula, office-based technical assistance as well as access to publications and other resources.

    Target Audience
    The NTJC's target audience continues to be judges, peacemakers and all court related personnel such as court clerks, court administrators, attorneys, lay advocates, probation officers and law enforcement as well as social service providers to tribal communities. Training and Technical assistance is not limited to tribes that have been awarded federal grants such as CTAS.

    DOJ Funding Agency(s)

    Bureau of Justice Assistance

    Contact information:

    Christine Folsom-Smith, Director
    P (800) 255-8343 | cfsmith@judges.org

    Pat Lenzi, Program Attorney
    P (800)255-8343 | plenzi@judges.org

    Jennifer Leal, Program Manager
    P (800) 255-8343 | jleal@judges.org

    Web www.judges.org/ntjc

  • Institute for Native Justice (INJ), American Indian Resource Center (AIRC)

    DOJ TTA area of focus: Courts

    About INJ, AIRC
    In 2005, the American Indian Resource Center, Inc. (AIRC) created the Institute for Native Justice (INJ) in response to indicators that rural and tribal communities contend with issues of interpersonal and community violence on a daily basis. INJ offers T/TA services, programs design and capacity building work to become a part of the solution by building and improving the response of Tribal judges, victim advocates, law enforcement, court personnel, and tribal and rural community based services. It is for these reasons that the Institute for Native Justice was created to confront and address the inequities of the justice system towards victims of crime with an emphasis on victims of domestic violence, sexual assault, stalking and dating violence.

    Services Provided
    The Institute for Native Justice is a partner with the BJA T/TA providers, undertaking the Tribal Response and Court Enhancement Strategies (TRACES) project. The project focuses on tribal court systems to develop capacity building, provide on-site training and technical assistance, training opportunities for court personnel, workshops, and collaborative team building.

    Target Audience
    Service area includes:

    • Tribal and Rural Communities
    • Tribal Leadership
    • Tribal Court Judges
    • Tribal Prosecutors
    • Tribal Court Personnel
    • Tribal Victim Advocates/Victim Witness Coordinators,
    • Community-Based Advocates
    • Service Providers for Domestic Violence
    • Sexual Assault, Stalking and Dating Violence Victims
    • Tribal Social and Behavioral Services
    • Shelter Staff
    • Tribal Law Enforcement
    • Faith-Based Service Providers
    • Traditional Tribal Healers
    • Community-Based Organizations partnering with Tribes (CASA, women's shelters)
    • State/Local Task Force Project Directors

    Training and Technical assistance is not limited to tribes that have been awarded federal grants such as CTAS.

    DOJ Funding Agency(s)

    Bureau of Justice Assistance

    Contact information:

    Robin Gann, Training Coordinator
    P (918) 708-1708 | rgann@aircinj.org

    Pam Moore, Director
    P (918) 708-1708 | pmoore@aircinj.org

    Justice Darrell Dowty, TRACES Project Director
    P (918) 931-8455 | dowtyd@sbcglobal.net

    John Sawney, Esq., Program Specialist
    P (918) 774-5675 | johnsawney@gmail.com

    Web www.institutefornativejustice.org

  • National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges (NCJFCJ)

    DOJ training area of focus:  Juvenile Justice and Tribal Courts

    About NCJFCJ
    One of the largest and oldest judicial membership organizations in the nation, the NCJFCJ serves over 30,000 professionals each year  in the juvenile and family justice system including state and tribal court judges, referees, commissioners, court masters and administrators, social and mental health workers, police, and probation officers. The organization's mission is to continuously improve the juvenile and family court system and court practices and to raise awareness of the core issues that touch the lives of our nation's children, youth, families and victims of domestic violence.

    Recognizing that tribal courts are unique and parallel systems of justice, NCJFCJ has made a commitment to meaningful and ongoing collaboration with tribes, approaching its work from a place of honor, respect, and mutual learning. The NCJFCJ is engaging tribal courts and judges in cultural humility with an understanding that best practices in tribal courts may be different than state courts and diverse perspectives will serve to strengthen solutions.

    Services Provided
    NCJFCJ provides the resources, knowledge and training to improve the lives of children, youth, families and victims of domestic violence seeking justice. Resources for tribal courts and related stakeholders (e.g. tribal child welfare) include, but are not limited to, the following:

    • Cutting-edge training, through local and national conferences and customized training for your  jurisdiction;
    • Wide-ranging technical assistance;
    • Research and evaluation services, through NCJFCJ and NCJFCJ's research partner, the National Center on Juvenile Justice and;
    • Unique advanced degree programs for judges and other court professionals offered in conjunction with the University of Nevada, Reno and the National Judicial College.

    Current major NCJFCJ initiatives and project support partnerships include:

    • Child Victims Act Model Courts Project–a network of dependency-focused tribal and state courts that serve as models and mentors to jurisdictions nationwide.
    • Juvenile Justice Model Courts Project–a network of state courts that seek to improve practice in delinquency cases through implementation of the Juvenile Delinquency Guidelines.
    • Juvenile Drug Court Training and Technical Assistance Project–working in collaboration with Office of Justice Programs to help juvenile drug courts implement or enhance their juvenile drug courts.
    • Courts Catalyzing Change Initiative (CCC) - a continuing focus of NCJFCJ's CCC work is in the area of ICWA compliance and ongoing training, TA and research and evaluation on disproportionality and disparities among youth of color in the foster care system.
    • National Resource Center on Legal and Judicial Issues–a partnership between NCJFCJ, the American Bar Association and the National Center for State Courts that delivers critical training and technical assistance to jurisdictions around the country, including the foundational judicial leadership curriculum, training evaluation guide and customized training, technical assistance and research and evaluation services for tribal courts and stakeholders.
    • National Center for Juvenile Justice–NCJFCJ's research arm, based in Pittsburgh, Pa., is the country's only non-profit research organization dedicated to the juvenile justice system.

    Target Audience/Eligibility
    NCJFCJ provides TTA resources for tribal court personnel and related stakeholders (e.g. tribal child welfare) as it relates to juvenile justice.   NCJFCJ is able to provide Training and Technical to all federally recognized tribes, not only those tribes that have been awarded federal grants such as CTAS.

    DOJ Funding Agency(s)

    Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention

    Contact Information:

    Melissa Bahmer, Director (Child Abuse and Neglect)
    P (775) 784-7709 | mbahmer@ncjfcj.org

    Gina Jackson, Site Liaison
    P (775) 784-7040 | gjackson@ncjfcj.org

    Web www.ncjfcj.org/our-work/tribal-work

Tribal Civil and Criminal Legal Assistance

  • National American Indian Court Judges Association (NAICJA)

    DOJ training area of focus:  Tribal Civil and Criminal Legal Assistance Program (TCCLA)

    About NAICJA
    NAICJA is an a national Native § 501(c)(3) organization and national association comprised of tribal justice personnel & others devoted to supporting and strengthening tribal justice systems through education, information sharing, and advocacy.

    Services Provided
    In FY 2011, BJA funded NAICJA, to serve as a training and technical assistance (TTA) provider to FY 2010 and 2011 TCCLA grantees (civil and criminal), indigent defense services, tribal leaders, and those organizations seeking to provide civil legal assistance or public defender services for tribal communities and Alaska native villages. NAICJA's National Tribal Justice Resource Center  (Resource Center) is its training and technical assistance arm and provides TTA to tribal justice systems through: federally-funded projects, referrals (telephonically and via email), and onsite TTA.

    Target Audience
    NAICJA and its Resource Center work with modern and traditional tribal justice systems and their staff including tribal judges, court administrators, court clerks, prosecutors, public defenders, probation officers, Guardian Ad Litems and more.

    DOJ Funding Agency(s)

    Bureau of Justice Assistance

    Contact Information:

    Tina M. Farrenkopf, Executive Director
    P (303) 449-4112 | tina@naicja.org

    Catherine A. Bryan, Associate Director
    P (303) 449-4112 | catherine@naicja.org

    Web www.naicja.org

  • American Probation and Parole Association (APPA)

    DOJ training area of focus:  Tribal Civil and Criminal Legal Assistance Program (TCCLA)

    About APPA
    The American Probation and Parole Association (APPA) is an international association composed of members from the United States, Canada and other countries actively involved with probation, parole and community-based corrections, in both adult and juvenile sectors. The association represents a voice for the field of community corrections whose mission is to serve, challenge and empower its members and constituents by educating, communicating and training; advocating and influencing; acting as a resource and conduit for information, ideas and support; developing standards and models; and collaborating with other disciplines. APPA is committed to improving probation and parole practices at all levels by fostering the development of necessary knowledge, skills, resources and legislation for the most effective and realistic probation, parole and community-based correctional programming. APPA develops a variety of resources each year, including publications, bulletins, audio-teleconferences, guidebooks, etc., related to community corrections that are available on its website www.appa-net.org.

    Services Provided
    In FY 2012, BJA funded the Council of State Governments and the APPA, in partnership with the University of North Dakota Tribal Judicial Institute and the National Tribal Judicial Center at the National Judicial College, to assist in tribal justice systems enhancements. APPA and its partners will develop and disseminate a training needs assessment focusing on three areas:  1) indigent defense, 2)TLOA enhanced sentencing authority  implementation and 3) concurrent criminal jurisdiction implementation; deliver two national/regional trainings addressing the three topics above and comprised of jurisdictional teams (prosecutors, judges, defense and community corrections personnel); provide on-site technical assistance; and provide office-based technical assistance.

    Target Audience/Eligibility
    Tribal probation officers, tribal court judges, tribal correctional staff, and other tribal court personnel involved in the community supervision of defendants and probationers. Tribes that are DOJ grantees and tribes who have an interest in strengthening their tribal justice systems are eligible for these TTA resources.

    DOJ Funding Agency(s)

    Bureau of Justice Assistance

    Contact Information:

    Carrie Abner, Research Associate
    P (859) 244-8031 | cabner@csg.org

    Kimberly Cobb, Research Associate
    P (859) 244-8015 | kcobb@csg.org

    Tracy Mullins, Deputy Director
    P (859) 244-8215 | tmullins@csg.org

    Web www.appa-net.org

Corrections, Alternatives to Incarceration, and Reentry

  • American Probation and Parole Association (APPA)

    DOJ Training area of focus: Community Corrections and Correctional Alternatives

    About APPA
    The American Probation and Parole Association (APPA) is an international association composed of members from the United States, Canada and other countries actively involved with probation, parole and community-based corrections, in both adult and juvenile sectors. The association represents a voice for the field of community corrections whose mission is to serve, challenge and empower its members and constituents by educating, communicating and training; advocating and influencing; acting as a resource and conduit for information, ideas and support; developing standards and models; and collaborating with other disciplines. APPA is committed to improving probation and parole practices at all levels by fostering the development of necessary knowledge, skills, resources and legislation for the most effective and realistic probation, parole and community-based correctional programming. APPA develops a variety of resources each year, including publications, bulletins, audio-teleconferences, guidebooks, etc., related to community corrections that are available on its website www.appa-net.org.

    Services Provided

    Tribal Community Corrections, Correctional Alternatives, and Reentry.  APPA partners with Fox Valley Technical College (FVTC) to build the capacity of tribal jurisdictions to plan, develop, or enhance their community corrections programs by focusing on community supervision strategies—including pretrial services, correctional options/alternatives to incarceration, and reentry services—through the development and delivery of training, provision of technical assistance, and development of a web-based template repository.  On-site technical assistance is available to assist any tribe interested in receiving assistance to help identify, develop, and/or enhance the use of correctional options (such as probation programs, day reporting centers, elder panels, transitional housing, etc.) in their community. Additionally, APPA works with FVTC to develop, deliver, and evaluate training for tribal probation officers. 

    APPA hosts two national training institutes per year and develops a variety of resources specific to
    community corrections including publications, web based and classroom based training, & webinars,
    and provides technical assistance to state and tribal jurisdictions.

    APPA's Tribal Issues Committee.  APPA's Tribal Issues Committee provides a forum for tribal, county, state, and federal community corrections personnel to address issues facing Indian Country, work together to identify ways to address those issues, and share ideas with other community corrections professionals and decision makers.
    This committee meets at each APPA Training Institute as well as through web-based meetings or teleconferences throughout the year.

    Target Audience/Eligibility
    Tribal probation officers, tribal court judges, tribal correctional staff, and other tribal court personnel involved in the community supervision of defendants and probationers. Tribes do not have to receive CTAS or other DOJ funding to be eligible for these TTA resources.

    DOJ Funding Agency(s)

    Bureau of Justice Assistance
    Office on Violence Against Women

    Contact Information:

    Carrie Abner, Research Associate
    P (859) 244-8031 | cabner@csg.org

    Kimberly Cobb, Research Associate
    P (859) 244-8015 | kcobb@csg.org

    Tracy Mullins, Deputy Director
    P (859) 244-8215 | tmullins@csg.org

    Web www.appa-net.org

  • National Indian Justice Center

    DOJ Training area of focus: Courts, Corrections, and Alternatives to Incarceration

    About NIJC
    The National Indian Justice Center is a 100% Indian owned and operated training and technical assistance organization with the primary purpose of improving the administration of justice in Indian Country. NIJC was founded in 1983 and has developed more than 40 training courses for tribal government personnel, is contracted by tribes for tribal court evaluations and provides technical assistance on various issues facing tribal governments.

    Services Provided
    Currently, NIJC serves as BJA's primary TTA provider under the Correctional Systems and Correctional Alternatives on Tribal Lands (CSCATL) Training and Technical Assistance (TTA) Program.  This program is designed to assist tribes with the 1) identification of justice system needs and the planning process for renovating and constructing correctional facilities, multi-purpose justice centers, or correctional alternative facilities, and 2) development, implementation, or enhancement of community-based correctional alternatives to address the incarceration and rehabilitation of juvenile and adult offenders subject to tribal jurisdiction.

    In regard to Indian Alcohol and Substance Abuse, NIJC receives a cooperative agreement from the U.S. Department of Justice, Bureau of Justice Assistance to administer Turning Points: A Comprehensive Tribal Court Alcohol and Substance Abuse Training Program. The Turning Points Training Program is designed to build the capacity of tribal justice systems that work with clients who are impacted by alcohol and substance abuse addiction.  The goals of the project are to improve tribal court intake systems and processes to increase tribal courts' ability to anticipate client risk and protective factors for substance abuse and violence, resulting in the ability to provide rehabilitative services that meet the health needs of clients who struggle with these issues. This curriculum highlights the following programs and tools:  NIJC's curriculum for tribal courts concerning clients impacted by FASD, NPC's Juvenile Crime Prevention (JCP) Program, and the Haywood Burns Institute's Disproportionate Minority Confinement program.  For more information, please visit http://www.nijc.org/capacity.html.

    Additionally, NIJC receives funding from the U.S. Department of Justice, Office for Victims of Crime to administer the Tribal Traffic Safety Justice Liaison Project which addresses the Victims of Drunk and Impaired Driving – Underserved Community topic area. Over 36-months, the NIJC, administrator of a Tribal Transportation Technical  Assistance Program (TTAP), will develop and pilot a program that provides  comprehensive training and technical assistance (TTA) resources to tribal and  non-Indian justice system personnel to help them provide more effective and  culturally competent services to American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN)  victims of alcohol-related motor vehicles crashes.   For more information, please visit http://www.nijc.org/fas/.

    Target Audience/Eligibility
    Target audience includes tribal court personnel, tribal transportation personnel, tribal leaders, tribal attorneys, state and federal agencies working with tribal governments, and tribal corrections practitioners. Training and Technical assistance is not limited to tribes that have been awarded federal grants such as CTAS.

    DOJ Funding Agency(s)

    Bureau of Justice Assistance
    Office for Victims of Crime

    Contact Information:

    P (707) 579-5507 or toll free (800) 966-0662| nijc@aol.com

    Web www.nijc.org

  • National Reentry Resource Center (NRRC)

    DOJ Training area of focus: Reentry

    About NRRC
    The National Reentry Resource Center provides education, training, and technical assistance to states, tribes, territories, local governments, service providers, non-profit organizations, and corrections institutions working on prisoner reentry. The NRRC's mission is to advance the reentry field through knowledge transfer and dissemination and to promote evidence-based best practices.

    Established in 2008 by the Second Chance Act (Public Law 110-199), the NRRC is administered by the Bureau of Justice Assistance, U.S. Department of Justice, and is a project of the Council of State Governments Justice Center, along with key project partners including the Urban Institute, the Association of State Correctional Administrators, and the American Probation and Parole Association.

    Services Provided
    NRRC provides the following services:

    • A one-stop, interactive source of current, evidence-based, and user-friendly reentry information.
    • Individualized, targeted technical assistance for Second Chance Act grantees.
    • Training, distance learning, and knowledge development to support grantees and advance the reentry field.

    Target Audience/Eligibility
    NRRC provides Training and Technical Assistance to states, federally recognized Indian tribes, territories, local governments, service providers, nonprofit organizations, and corrections institutions working on prisoner reentry.
    DOJ Funding Agency(s)

    Bureau of Justice Assistance

    Contact Information:

    P (877) 332-1719| info@nationalreentryresourcecenter.org

    Web www.nationalreentryresourcecenter.org/

  • Education Development Center (EDC)

    DOJ training area of focus:  Juvenile Justice , Community Analysis, Reentry, and Corrections

    About EDC
    Education Development Center, Inc. (EDC) is a global nonprofit organization with over 50 years designing, delivering, and evaluating innovative programs to address some of the world's most urgent challenges in education, health, and economic opportunity. EDC's services include research, training, educational materials and strategy, with activities ranging from seed projects to large-scale national and international initiatives.

    For the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP), EDC's Tribal Youth Training and Technical Assistance Center (TYTTAC) and Tribal Juvenile Detention and Reentry Training and Technical Assistance Center (TJDR) provides customized training and technical assistance to more than 120 American Indian and Alaska Native communities across the country.  

    Services Provided
    EDC's TTA Centers concentrate on needs and resource assessment, strategic planning, implementation, evaluation, and sustainability to decrease delinquency and provide a wider array of culturally specific and tribal best practices intervention and prevention services for the community.

    Tribal Youth Training and Technical Assistance Center: TYTTAC provides  TTA  to OJJDP Tribal Youth grantees   and TTA is also available all federally recognized tribes to increase AI/AN communities' skills and knowledge about programs and strategies, building tribes' capacity to develop effective and sustainable programs for reducing juvenile crime and increasing youth potential in tribal communities.

    Tribal Juvenile Detention and Reentry Training and Technical Assistance Center: TJDR provides TTA to OJJDP TJDR grantees, tribal juvenile detention centers, and to all federally recognized tribes seeking to improve services to tribal youth in detention and reentry or improving their tribal juvenile justice systems. TJDR also provides resources for tribes interested in developing green and sustainable economic projects involving detained or reentering tribal youth.  For more information, please visit www.justice.gov/tribal/tta-edc.html. 

    EDC TYTTAC and TJDR TTA Center achieve these goals through the following methods:

    One-on-One Assistance - Open to all federally recognized tribes, this type of TA utilizes phone and e-mail consultation tailored to meet each tribe's individual needs through expert guidance, resources, materials, and referrals.

    Trainings and Conferences - Our Trainings and Conferences provide opportunities for OJJDP-funded Tribal Grantees to network with other tribes and learn about specific topics of interest, such as strategic planning, implementation, sustainability, and programming.

    Webinars and Online Learning- These online learning opportunities bring in professionals from across Indian Country to lend their expertise and provide resources and guidance on topics based on the needs of AI/AN Communities.

    Websites and E-Newsletter - Updated daily and sent out weekly, both mediums provide information on tribal research and resources, grant opportunities, conferences, trainings and special events, OJJDP news, and grantee stories.  

    Site Visits - On-site technical assistance for all federally-recognized tribes address those specific needs identified by tribes and allow for all important stakeholders to participate in consultant-facilitated, intensive training on various topics from staff capacity building, strategic planning, and coalition building.

    Target Audience/Eligibility
    EDC's TYTTAC and TJDR are able to provide Training and Technical to all federally recognized tribes, not only those tribes that have been awarded federal grants such as CTAS.   EDC TYTTAC and TJDR work with various stakeholders within Tribal communities including those in the juvenile justice and tribal court system, mental and behavioral health providers, social services, tribal law enforcement,  tribal leadership, elders and families.

    DOJ Funding Agency(s)

    Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention

    Contact Information:

    P (651) 291-2972 | sautumn@edc.org

    Web www.tribalyouthprogram.org, www.tribalreentry.org

  • Fox Valley Technical College, National Criminal Justice Training Center

    DOJ Training area of focus: Law Enforcement, Community Analysis, Indian Alcohol and Substance Abuse, Tribal Probation

    About FVTC
    Fox Valley Technical College (FVTC) is one of the leading national trainers and educators in law enforcement today. Through its criminal justice centers and programs it has been delivering best-practice training and technical assistance since 1983. To better serve its customers including law enforcement, corrections and courts, FVTC recently reorganized these programs and centers of the college and structured them within the new National Criminal Justice Training Center (NCJTC). The programs implemented through NCJTC encompass federally funded training and technical assistance programs and services, contract and cost recovery training. Each operation within NCJTC specializes in a particular set of issues critical to the criminal justice field. The training and technical assistance programs are dedicated to improving the knowledge, skills, capability, capacity, and leadership potential of our nation's criminal justice professionals and systems.

    Services Provided
    The cornerstone of NCJTC's philosophy is reliance on community partnerships to develop strategies targeted to meet community challenges and needs. NCJTC conducts trainings that help the criminal justice community analyze needs, identify gaps and assets, and create community-based solutions that ensure ownership, pride, and sustainability.  Additionally, NCJTC provides TTA to tribes that are focusing on addressing alcohol and substance abuse efforts that are consistent with the scope of the Indian Alcohol and Substance Abuse program.

    NCJTC's earliest projects remain the cornerstone of the Center's work, including development of regional and national multi-jurisdictional and multi-disciplinary law enforcement training, courthouse safety and security, as well as community analysis as a precursor to effective justice system planning strategies. NCJTC takes pride in its close ties to the law enforcement community which enables Center staff to develop, promote, and deliver high-quality training and technical assistance programs that address today's diverse and challenging issues.

    The Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS) funds NCJTC to deliver Tribal Oriented Policing Strategies: A Community Policing Approach to Reducing Crime in Indian Country training course. This course was designed specifically for the Native American community policing practitioners. The training will demonstrate how to strengthen relationships between law enforcement, tribal agencies, and the community to improve quality of life and enhance the community safety, through community policing efforts.

    NCJTC Helping Communities

    Program Support
    • Peer-to-peer support (information exchange and mentoring for individuals and groups or with multiple jurisdictions)
    • Publication drafting and dissemination
    • Workshops and training events (agenda development, speaker identification, and logistical support)
    • Curriculum development

    Program Development
    • Diversion and prevention programs
    • Treatment and services for offenders and families
    • Resource development and grant writing strategies to promote sustainability

    Strategic Planning
    • Community development and assessment strategies
    • Capacity and team building

    Specialized Training Topical Areas
    • Tribal law enforcement
    • Tribal probation
    • Working with juvenile offenders
    • Gang awareness/Native youth gangs
    • Drug and alcohol identification and recognition
    • Restorative justice
    • Peacemaking
    • Community policing

    Additional conference and training opportunities include:
    • American Indian Justice Conference (AIJC)
    • Community Analysis Process for Planning Strategies (CAPPS)
    • Crimes Against Children in Indian Country Conference
    • Drugs: Identification, Recognition, and Legal Update Training
    • Highly Effective Grant Program Management Training
    • Multi-Jurisdictional Law Enforcement Conference
    • Native American Law Enforcement Summit (NALES)
    • Selling and Sustaining Your Program: Successful Grant Writing
    • Tribal Faculty Development
    • Tribal Probation Academy (TPA)

    Target Audience/Eligibility
    NCJTC offers services for federally recognized tribes to:

    • improve tribal justice and public safety programs through comprehensive planning;
    • create programs that prevent, address and reduce alcohol- and substance abuse related crime; and
    • assist tribal governments to build the capacity to operate alternatives to incarceration and community corrections (probation and/or parole programs).

    Tribes do not have to receive CTAS or other DOJ funding to be eligible for these TTA resources.

    Funding Agency(s)

    Bureau of Justice Assistance
    Office of Community Oriented Policing Services

    Contact Information:

    Rebecca Murdock, Program Manager
    P (920) 735-2517 | murdock@fvtc.edu

    Dawn Rall, Project Coordinator
    P (920) 225-5905 | rall@fvtc.edu

    Justine Souto, Project Specialist
    P (920) 993-5175 | souto@fvtc.edu

    Dave Raasch, Project Specialist
    P (920) 996-2973 | raasch@fvtc.edu

    Web www.fvtc.edu/tribal

Juvenile Delinquency Prevention and Justice

  • Education Development Center (EDC)

    DOJ training area of focus:  Juvenile Justice , Community Analysis, Reentry, and Corrections

    About EDC
    Education Development Center, Inc. (EDC) is a global nonprofit organization with over 50 years designing, delivering, and evaluating innovative programs to address some of the world's most urgent challenges in education, health, and economic opportunity. EDC's services include research, training, educational materials and strategy, with activities ranging from seed projects to large-scale national and international initiatives.

    For the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP), EDC's Tribal Youth Training and Technical Assistance Center (TYTTAC) and Tribal Juvenile Detention and Reentry Training and Technical Assistance Center (TJDR) provides customized training and technical assistance to more than 120 American Indian and Alaska Native communities across the country.  

    Services Provided
    EDC's TTA Centers concentrate on needs and resource assessment, strategic planning, implementation, evaluation, and sustainability to decrease delinquency and provide a wider array of culturally specific and tribal best practices intervention and prevention services for the community.

    Tribal Youth Training and Technical Assistance Center: TYTTAC provides  TTA  to OJJDP Tribal Youth grantees   and TTA is also available all federally recognized tribes to increase AI/AN communities' skills and knowledge about programs and strategies, building tribes' capacity to develop effective and sustainable programs for reducing juvenile crime and increasing youth potential in tribal communities.

    Tribal Juvenile Detention and Reentry Training and Technical Assistance Center: TJDR provides TTA to OJJDP TJDR grantees, tribal juvenile detention centers, and to all federally recognized tribes seeking to improve services to tribal youth in detention and reentry or improving their tribal juvenile justice systems. TJDR also provides resources for tribes interested in developing green and sustainable economic projects involving detained or reentering tribal youth.  For more information, please visit www.justice.gov/tribal/tta-edc.html. 

    EDC TYTTAC and TJDR TTA Center achieve these goals through the following methods:

    One-on-One Assistance - Open to all federally recognized tribes, this type of TA utilizes phone and e-mail consultation tailored to meet each tribe's individual needs through expert guidance, resources, materials, and referrals.

    Trainings and Conferences - Our Trainings and Conferences provide opportunities for OJJDP-funded Tribal Grantees to network with other tribes and learn about specific topics of interest, such as strategic planning, implementation, sustainability, and programming.

    Webinars and Online Learning- These online learning opportunities bring in professionals from across Indian Country to lend their expertise and provide resources and guidance on topics based on the needs of AI/AN Communities.

    Websites and E-Newsletter - Updated daily and sent out weekly, both mediums provide information on tribal research and resources, grant opportunities, conferences, trainings and special events, OJJDP news, and grantee stories.  

    Site Visits - On-site technical assistance for all federally-recognized tribes address those specific needs identified by tribes and allow for all important stakeholders to participate in consultant-facilitated, intensive training on various topics from staff capacity building, strategic planning, and coalition building.

    Target Audience/Eligibility
    EDC's TYTTAC and TJDR are able to provide Training and Technical to all federally recognized tribes, not only those tribes that have been awarded federal grants such as CTAS.   EDC TYTTAC and TJDR work with various stakeholders within Tribal communities including those in the juvenile justice and tribal court system, mental and behavioral health providers, social services, tribal law enforcement,  tribal leadership, elders and families.

    DOJ Funding Agency(s)

    Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention

    Contact Information:

    P (651) 291-2972 | sautumn@edc.org

    Web www.tribalyouthprogram.org, www.tribalreentry.org

  • Rural Alaska Community Action Program, Inc. (RurAL CAP) (Alaska only)

    DOJ training area of focus: Alaska Native Youth Delinquency

    About RurAL CAP
    Founded in 1965, the Rural Alaska Community Action Program, Inc. is a private, statewide, nonprofit organization working in 83 communities across Alaska. Its mission is to empower low-income Alaskans through advocacy, education, affordable housing and direct services that respect our unique values and cultures. RurAL CAP recognizes the unique values and ways of rural Alaskans. It plans it activities with input from and respect for the people it serves. It follows the belief that rural Alaskan communities have the right to maintain their cultural heritage and close relationship to the land while protecting their economic and human potential.

    Services Provided
    RurAL CAP is OJJDP's provider for the Alaskan Native Youth Training and Technical Assistance Project. The mission of the Alaska Native Youth TTA project is to reduce Alaska Native youth delinquency rates by increasing Tribal community and youth-serving organization capacity to nurture positive youth development and support strength-based and data-driven juvenile justice approaches. The primary objectives are to develop a resource center that mobilizes multidisciplinary experts in providing TTA and increases youth voice and leadership in youth services.

    Target Audience/Eligibility
    This project is specifically designed for Alaska Native tribal community and youth-serving organizations that focus on nurturing positive youth development and support strength-based and data- driven juvenile approaches. 

    DOJ Funding Agency(s)
    Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention

    Contact Information:

    Becky Judd, Project Supervisor
    P (907) 301-9725 | bjudd@ruralcap.com

    Amy Gorn, Project Coordinator
    P (907) 623-0769 | agorn@ruralcap.com

    Web www.ruralcap.com

  • National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges (NCJFCJ)

    DOJ training area of focus:  Juvenile Justice and Tribal Courts

    About NCJFCJ
    One of the largest and oldest judicial membership organizations in the nation, the NCJFCJ serves over 30,000 professionals each year  in the juvenile and family justice system including state and tribal court judges, referees, commissioners, court masters and administrators, social and mental health workers, police, and probation officers. The organization's mission is to continuously improve the juvenile and family court system and court practices and to raise awareness of the core issues that touch the lives of our nation's children, youth, families and victims of domestic violence.

    Recognizing that tribal courts are unique and parallel systems of justice, NCJFCJ has made a commitment to meaningful and ongoing collaboration with tribes, approaching its work from a place of honor, respect, and mutual learning. The NCJFCJ is engaging tribal courts and judges in cultural humility with an understanding that best practices in tribal courts may be different than state courts and diverse perspectives will serve to strengthen solutions.

    Services Provided
    NCJFCJ provides the resources, knowledge and training to improve the lives of children, youth, families and victims of domestic violence seeking justice. Resources for tribal courts and related stakeholders (e.g. tribal child welfare) include, but are not limited to, the following:

    • Cutting-edge training, through local and national conferences and customized training for your  jurisdiction;
    • Wide-ranging technical assistance;
    • Research and evaluation services, through NCJFCJ and NCJFCJ's research partner, the National Center on Juvenile Justice and;
    • Unique advanced degree programs for judges and other court professionals offered in conjunction with the University of Nevada, Reno and the National Judicial College.

    Current major NCJFCJ initiatives and project support partnerships include:

    • Child Victims Act Model Courts Project–a network of dependency-focused tribal and state courts that serve as models and mentors to jurisdictions nationwide.
    • Juvenile Justice Model Courts Project–a network of state courts that seek to improve practice in delinquency cases through implementation of the Juvenile Delinquency Guidelines.
    • Juvenile Drug Court Training and Technical Assistance Project–working in collaboration with Office of Justice Programs to help juvenile drug courts implement or enhance their juvenile drug courts.
    • Courts Catalyzing Change Initiative (CCC) - a continuing focus of NCJFCJ's CCC work is in the area of ICWA compliance and ongoing training, TA and research and evaluation on disproportionality and disparities among youth of color in the foster care system.
    • National Resource Center on Legal and Judicial Issues–a partnership between NCJFCJ, the American Bar Association and the National Center for State Courts that delivers critical training and technical assistance to jurisdictions around the country, including the foundational judicial leadership curriculum, training evaluation guide and customized training, technical assistance and research and evaluation services for tribal courts and stakeholders.
    • National Center for Juvenile Justice–NCJFCJ's research arm, based in Pittsburgh, Pa., is the country's only non-profit research organization dedicated to the juvenile justice system.

    Target Audience/Eligibility
    NCJFCJ provides TTA resources for tribal court personnel and related stakeholders (e.g. tribal child welfare) as it relates to juvenile justice.   NCJFCJ is able to provide Training and Technical to all federally recognized tribes, not only those tribes that have been awarded federal grants such as CTAS.

    DOJ Funding Agency(s)

    Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention

    Contact Information:

    Melissa Bahmer, Director (Child Abuse and Neglect)
    P (775) 784-7709| mbahmer@ncjfcj.org

    Gina Jackson, Site Liaison
    P (775) 784-7040| gjackson@ncjfcj.org

    Web www.ncjfcj.org/our-work/tribal-work

  • Lamar Associates, LLC

    DOJ Training area of focus: Law Enforcement, Substance Abuse, and Juvenile Justice

    About Lamar Associates
    Lamar Associates is a full service solutions provider for investigations, law enforcement, security and emergency preparedness needs. From background checks and due diligence, to risk threat and crisis management, we have access to state-of-the-art technology and a team of elite law enforcement and security experts capable of meeting the most complex challenges in today’s unsettled environment. We offer modular, flexible and scalable solution for any size company or organization to address potentially harmful situations, whether natural, accidental or intentional. With integrated, comprehensive planning and implementation geared toward your specific needs, Lamar Associated will help you prepare for tomorrow while protecting today.

    Services Provided
    The company currently provides training and technical assistance services to the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) in the area of juvenile related topics such as the Tribal Law and Order Act and it’s relation to juvenile detention issues.

    Lamar Associates also provides services to the Office of Community Oriented Public Service (COPS) by providing twenty-two training opportunities to participate in the Tribal Prescription Drug Abuse and Drug Endangered Children Program with regional, webinar, and web-based online courses in the topics of Drug Endangered Children; Prescription Drug Abuse; Community Policing Concepts; and Problem Solving Strategies.   Pharmaceutical drug abuse in Indian Country has grown to become a significant public safety issue that has contributed to the increase in violent crime rates in Indian Country, devastated Native American families, endangered children, and created a strain on the limited resources available to tribal law enforcement and service programs. In order to address this serious public safety concern, Lamar Associates, LLC (Lamar), and its project partners, the National Indian Child Welfare Association and the National Association of Drug Diversion Investigators have been funded to develop the “Tribal Prescription Drug Endangered Children Training and Technical Assistance Program”. Lamar and its partners will develop a training curricula and provide technical assistance that will: 1) increase the capacity of law enforcement agencies to serve the needs of drug endangered children and 2) increase the capacity of law enforcement agencies to build partnerships with public health, prevention, and treatment providers that will lead to coordinated community responses to prevent prescription drug diversion and abuse. The training curriculum will be designed to acquaint the participants with: The Indian Child Welfare Act (25 U.S.C. 1901); civil and criminal jurisdiction in Indian Country; roles and responsibilities of service groups; types of reporting, cross-reporting, and information sharing; safety procedures for children, families, and responding personnel; accepted drug endangered children protocols; the national pharmaceutical drug assessments; the pharmaceutical impact in Indian Country including trends, signs of exposure in children, identification of drug user behavior and paraphernalia; identification drug contaminated environments; child risk assessment methodologies; community policing principles, problem-solving techniques, and strategic planning and collaboration with federal, state, private and tribal organizations. For additional information about the trainings and technical assistance that Lamar Associated provide, visit http://lamarassociates.net/indian-country-training.

    Program Support
    • Workshops and training events (agenda development, speaker identification, and logistical support)
    • Information exchange and mentoring for individuals and groups or with multiple jurisdictions)
    • Curriculum development
    • Online distance learning, webinars, etc.

    Strategic Planning
    • Community development and assessment strategies
    • Capacity and team building

    Specialized Training Topical Areas
    • Tribal law enforcement officer training
    • Emergency Preparedness
    • School Physical Security
    • Tribal Correctional Administrators training
    • Native Youth Gangs and Teen Sub-Culture Groups
    • Prescription Drug Abuse and Illicit Drug identification and prevention strategies
    • Community Policing

    Target Audience/Eligibility
    Lamar Associate’s primary target audience is federally recognized Native American and Alaskan Native tribes (“Tribes”) that have received grant funding through CTAS. Lamar Associates may also provide services to non-CTAS grant recipients if funding permits.

    DOJ Funding Agency(s)

    Office of Community Oriented Policing Services
    Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention

    Contact Information:

    P 202-543-8181 | info@lamarassociates.net

    Web www.lamarassociates.net

  • National Congress of American Indians

    Area of focus: Intergovernmental Collaboration

    About NCAI
    Founded in 1944, the National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) is the nation's oldest, largest, and most representative national Indian organization. NCAI was initially formed as a national body to combat the federal government's detrimental policies of termination and assimilation against Tribes, and to this day, it remains steadfast in its mission to protect and enhance tribal sovereignty. NCAI serves to secure for Indian peoples and their descendants the rights and benefits to which they are entitled; to enlighten the public toward a better understanding of Indian people; to preserve rights under Indian treaties or agreements with the United States; and to promote the common welfare of American Indians and Alaska Natives. It does so by hosting forums to debate and deliberate on pressing political issues and providing Tribes with a platform in the nation's capital from which their voices can be heard. The NCAI, largely through its 501(c)(3) affiliate the NCAI Fund, has been working for over 10 years to promote intergovernmental cooperation between states and tribes, first through a State-Tribal Relations Project in partnership with the National Conference of State Legislators, and currently through its Tribal-State Collaboration and Justice Capacity Building Project with the National Criminal Justice Association (NCJA).

    Services Provided
    NCAI's current Tribal-State Collaboration project with the NCJA aims to increase awareness by tribal and state government officials of the benefits of collaborative problem solving and planning and replicate promising practices for improving public safety in tribal communities through tribal-state collaboration methods. To accomplish this goal, NCAI is assisting NCJA with the development and implementation of a national training and technical assistance program with several training components, including working groups, webinars, pilot trainings, a mentoring program, and educational materials.

    In collaboration with the Department of Justice and OJJDP, NCAI designed and convened the 2011 and 2012 National Intertribal Youth Summits. The 2011 summit was held July 24–28, 2011, in Santa Fe, New Mexico, and the 2012 summit was held July 28–August 2, 2012, in Chevy Chase, MD. Nearly 200 tribal youth from across the nation, representing the various programs funded through OJJDP's Tribal Youth Program, participated in each summit. Throughout the week-long leadership development events, youth and adults participated in discussions with federal officials from the White House and the Departments of Justice, Interior, Health and Human Services, and Education on numerous topics, including education, health, cultural preservation, and civic engagement. 

    Target Audience/Eligibility
    NCAI's primary target audience includes tribal leaders and criminal justice stakeholders (e.g., tribal law enforcement officials, tribal judges, tribal prosecutors, victim advocates, etc. ). Training and Technical assistance is not limited to tribes that have been awarded federal grants such as CTAS.

    DOJ Funding Agency(s)
    Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention
    Bureau of Justice Assistance

    Contact Information:

    P (202) 466-7767 | ncai@ncai.org

    Web www.ncai.org

  • National Gang Center

    DOJ Training area of focus: Gangs

    About the National Gang Center
    The National Gang Center Web site features the latest research about gangs; descriptions of evidence-based, anti-gang programs; and links to tools, databases, and other resources to assist in developing and implementing effective community-based gang prevention, intervention, and suppression strategies. Visitors can read and download publications related to street gangs. An online form allows communities to request training and technical assistance as they plan and implement anti-gang strategies. Users can register for a variety of anti-gang training courses. The Web site also hosts a database of gang-related state legislation and municipal codes; a list of newspaper articles on nationwide gang activity, updated daily; and GANGINFO, an electronic mailing list for professionals working with gangs. For a list of all resources on this Web site, see Index to Site Content.

    Services Provided
    The National Gang Center offers four classes for law enforcement—Gangs in Indian Country, Basic Training for Street Gang Investigators, Gang Unit Supervision, and an Anti-Gang Seminar for Law
    Enforcement Chief Executives. These classes are provided on a regional basis to include participants from all law enforcement agencies (police and sheriff) within a geographical region.

    Gangs in Indian Country: In this three-day class, participants are provided with basic information about various gangs throughout the United States and receive specific, in-depth information about national and regional Native American gangs. Training topics include gang intelligence collection, investigative techniques, interviewing techniques, suppression strategies, and legal considerations in prosecuting gang crimes. For more information visit: http://www.nationalgangcenter.gov/Training-and-Technical-Assistance/Gangs-in-Indian-Country

    Basic Training for Street Gang Investigators: In this 3½-day class, participants are provided with basic information about the different types of gangs throughout the United States and receive specific, in-depth information about gangs in their region. They will learn about collecting gang intelligence, interviewing techniques, investigative techniques, suppression strategies, case-building strategies, and legal considerations in prosecuting gang crimes. http://www.nationalgangcenter.gov/Training-and-Technical-Assistance/Street-Gang-Investigators

    Gang Unit Supervision: This two-day class will enable participants to discuss and apply fundamental principles of effective gang unit supervision. Through the review and evaluation of best practice strategies, participants will be better prepared to develop the most appropriate organizational and management strategies for their department's gang unit. The information presented is applicable to participants who are forming new gang units as well as those operating existing gang units and multijurisdictional partnerships. For more information visit: http://www.nationalgangcenter.gov/Training-and-Technical-Assistance/Gang-Unit-Supervision

    Anti-Gang Seminar for Law Enforcement Chief Executives: This one-day seminar will allow police chiefs, sheriffs, and other law enforcement chief executives to discuss a variety of gang-related topics relevant to law enforcement executives. It is designed to be a collegial, facilitated event in which the participants' experiences are shared and constitute the educational value. Through discussions, brief scenario-based exercises, and shared resources, participants will learn from their peers while sharing their own experiences. For more information visit: http://www.nationalgangcenter.gov/Training-and-Technical-Assistance/Chief-Executives

    Additionally, the National Gang Center receives funding from the Office of Juvenile Delinquency Prevention to offer training and training in regard to the OJJDP Comprehensive Gang Model.  Visitors to the website will find an online overview that provides a 23-minute overview of the Model for individuals exploring strategies to assess and address their communities' gang problems. Key concepts covered include a brief overview of the nation's gang problem, a discussion of theory behind the Model and its five core strategies, a discussion on assessing the gang problem, and tools to assist community leaders in implementing the Model in their communities

    Target Audience/Eligibility
    The National Gang Center Offers training courses and resources that are designed for law enforcement officials such as police, sheriffs, and prosecutors.  Resources are available to DOJ grantees and non-grantees.

    DOJ Funding Agency(s)

    Bureau of Justice Assistance
    Office of Juvenile Delinquency and Prevention

    Contact Information:

    P (850) 385-0600 | information@nationalgangcenter.gov

    Web www.nationalgangcenter.gov

Victim Services

  • Unified Solutions Tribal Community Development Group, Inc. (Unified Solutions)

    DOJ Training area of focus:  Skills based training and technical assistance on victimization issues, program sustainability, capacity building, collaboration, and needs assessments, strategic plans and logic models development.

    About Unified Solutions
    Unified Solutions is a 501c3 nonprofit organization operated by a Native American Board of Directors with a diverse Native American and non-native staff.   Unified Solutions has designed and delivered training and technical assistance to Office of Justice Programs, Office for Victims of Crime (OVC) Tribal grantees since 2002.  Unified Solutions mission is to provide training, technical assistance, and human service and in doing so advance justice, advocate for victims of crime, and ensure strategies that address challenges experienced by culturally diverse individuals, communities, and organizations.   The agency maintains offices regionally throughout the country to best serve clients in the lower 48 states and Alaska and is dedicated to bringing communities together to overcome existing social problems and co-create a world of physical, emotional, social, and spiritual wellness.  Unified Solutions goal is to help facilitate community conversations and generate grassroots community leadership by providing the resources, education, and technical support necessary to empower communities to achieve their goals for social improvement.  

    Services Provided
    Unified Solutions provides training and technical assistance services to OJP/OVC Coordinated Tribal Assistance Solicitation (CTAS) recipients in Purpose Area 7 (Children's Justice Act Partnerships for Indian Communities) and Purpose Area 8 (Comprehensive Tribal Victim Assistance Program) including but not limited to:

    Program Support
    Program Sustainability and capacity building
    Collaboration
    Needs Assessment
    Strategic Planning
    Logic Model Development
    Consultant/ speaker identification and logistical support
    Community Change Strategies
    Grant Writing
    Data Collection
    Leadership Skills
    Volunteer Recruitment & Training
    Formative and Summative Evaluations
    Protocol Development

    Specialized Victimization workshops
    Homicide
    Domestic violence
    Cyber Crimes
    Stalking
    Sexual Assault
    Human Trafficking
    Crisis Management
    Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder
    Bullying
    Court room safety for victims
    Testifying in court
    Court room ethics for victim advocates
    Teen dating violence
    Gangs in Indian country
    Gang victimization
    Multidisciplinary teams
    Law Enforcement as Perpetrators of Domestic Violence
    Report writing
    Cultural responses to Tribal Victims
    Child Abuse Investigations
    Forensic Interviewing
    Child Abuse
    Court Preparation for Professionals
    Evidence Collection
    Coordinated Community Response
    Requirements & Techniques for Interviewing Child Victims
    Working with Child and Adult Victims with disabilities
    Maximizing Resources for Child Victims and Families
    Vicarious Trauma, Compassion Fatigue, and Burnout
    Elder Abuse

    Target Audience/Eligibility
    The target audience is American Indian and Alaska Native nations and their key stakeholders of those nations interested in promoting the improvement of services to tribal victims and survivors of crime.  Training and Technical assistance is limited to tribes that have been awarded federal grants such as CTAS or other fiscal support from foundations or Tribal leadership.

    DOJ Funding Agency(s)

    Office for Victims of Crime

    Contact Information:

    P (877)-438-4400 | contact@unified-solutions.org

    Web www.unified-solutions.org

Intergovernmental Collaboration

  • Center for Evidence-based Policy (CEP) at Oregon Health & Science University

    DOJ Training area of focus: Intergovernmental Collaboration

    About CEP
    The Center for Evidence-based Policy is a national leader in evidence-based decision making and policy design. We work with federal, state and local policymakers to use high-quality evidence to guide decisions, maximize resources and, improve health outcomes.  The Center, established in 2003 by Oregon Governor John Kitzhaber, M.D., works with a wide range of stakeholders to improve public policy through innovation, collaboration, and evidence-based policy. In fulfilling its mission, the
    Center:

    • Identifies existing research relevant to the needs of decision makers in government and nonprofit sectors;
    • Works with researchers to conduct original research that provides evidence-based answers to policy questions;
    • Facilitates collaborations of like-minded parties interested in using evidence in decision-making;
    • Engages diverse and relevant stakeholders in policy development.

    Services Provided
    The Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA) has funded CEP through the Together Everyone Achieves More (TEAM) project to:

    • Assist tribes, state, and local governments with developing collaborative initiatives
    • Improve client outcomes and make more effective use of jurisdictional resources;
    • Improve site understanding of and readiness to collaborate with jurisdictional partners;
    • Enhance site capacity through tool development and ongoing support of collaboration efforts;

    and

    • Engage in widespread dissemination of a “how-to” manual to foster collaborative  efforts between tribal and non-tribal entities.

    Target Audience/Eligibility
    TEAM project staff will document the collaborative work of the Leech Lake/Cass County Joint Jurisdictional Court, develop a “how-to” manual for replicating similar collaborations, and provide onsite training and technical assistance to one pilot site that has expressed intent to work on tribal, state, and/or local jurisdictional collaboration. Lessons learned will be disseminated through web site posting of the “how-to” manual, webinars, and conference presentations. Examples of collaboration may include joint-jurisdictional courts, restorative justice sentencing circles, avoiding double prosecution of defendants, issues of community and social determinants of health, and others.

    DOJ Funding Agency(s)

    Bureau of Justice Assistance

    Contact Information:

    Scott Warnick, Deputy Director
    P(503) 494-9447 | warnick@ohsu.edu

    Web www.ohsu.edu

  • National Criminal Justice Association

    DOJ Training area of focus: Intergovernmental Collaboration

    About NCJA
    Based in Washington, D.C., the NCJA is a nonprofit membership organization representing state, tribal and local governments on crime prevention and crime control issues. Its members represent all facets of the criminal and juvenile justice community, from law enforcement, corrections, prosecution, defense, courts, victim-witness services and educational institutions to federal, state and local elected officials. The NCJA is a national voice in shaping and implementing criminal justice policy since its founding in 1971. As the representative of state, tribal and local criminal and juvenile justice practitioners, the NCJA works to promote a balanced approach to communities' complex public safety and criminal and juvenile justice system problems. The NCJA recognizes the importance of interrelationships among criminal and juvenile justice agencies and between these agencies and the community and the strong, steady advocacy necessary to achieve comprehensive planning and policy coordination goals.

    Services Provided
    The intergovernmental collaboration TTA project is a joint project of the National Criminal Justice Association (NCJA) and the National Congress of American Indians (NCAI).

    Project Goals and Strategies

    • Continue to collaborate with the National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) on project objectives to guide tribal and state representatives and criminal justice stakeholders in building tribal-state collaboration efforts in justice areas;
    • Conduct two training programs using a team approach.  Teams from states will be led by the state agency administrator (SAA) and tribal teams within the states will be led by elected tribal leaders with justice system stakeholders from each. At least one will be conducted in and with PL-280 states.
    • Provided onsite and distance technical assistance to assist in implementing interagency collaborations;
    • Conduct webinars and online training session to reach states and tribes unable to participate in the pilot trainings and to disseminate promising practices.
    • Collect and disseminate promising practices in tribal-state collaboration and strategic justice planning using the membership organizations of both national organizations and other national organizations of key stakeholders.
    • Continue to update the resource materials, toolkits and information on the website.

    Target Audience
    The trainings will target teams from state and local governments and tribe in a state aimed at enhancing collaboration on law enforcement and other criminal justice issues specific to each state. Tribal and state jurisdictions will be able to compete for these training opportunities. The selection of sites will be done in consultation with BJA, tribes, states, and the NCJA-NCAI project team. The state teams will include the State Agency Administrator (SAA) as lead along with other key stakeholders including local law enforcement, courts, substance abuse treatment providers, and other appropriate justice practitioners. The tribal teams will include tribal leaders and tribal law enforcement, courts, treatment and service providers, and other tribal justice practitioners. Training and technical assistance is not limited to tribes that have been awarded federal grants such as CTAS.

    Contact Information:

    Cabell Cropper, Executive Director
    P (202) 628-8550 | ccropper@ncja.org

    Web www.ncja.org

  • National Congress of American Indians

    Area of focus: Intergovernmental Collaboration

    About NCAI
    Founded in 1944, the National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) is the nation's oldest, largest, and most representative national Indian organization. NCAI was initially formed as a national body to combat the federal government's detrimental policies of termination and assimilation against Tribes, and to this day, it remains steadfast in its mission to protect and enhance tribal sovereignty. NCAI serves to secure for Indian peoples and their descendants the rights and benefits to which they are entitled; to enlighten the public toward a better understanding of Indian people; to preserve rights under Indian treaties or agreements with the United States; and to promote the common welfare of American Indians and Alaska Natives. It does so by hosting forums to debate and deliberate on pressing political issues and providing Tribes with a platform in the nation's capital from which their voices can be heard. The NCAI, largely through its 501(c)(3) affiliate the NCAI Fund, has been working for over 10 years to promote intergovernmental cooperation between states and tribes, first through a State-Tribal Relations Project in partnership with the National Conference of State Legislators, and currently through its Tribal-State Collaboration and Justice Capacity Building Project with the National Criminal Justice Association (NCJA).

    Services Provided
    NCAI's current Tribal-State Collaboration project with the NCJA aims to increase awareness by tribal and state government officials of the benefits of collaborative problem solving and planning and replicate promising practices for improving public safety in tribal communities through tribal-state collaboration methods. To accomplish this goal, NCAI is assisting NCJA with the development and implementation of a national training and technical assistance program with several training components, including working groups, webinars, pilot trainings, a mentoring program, and educational materials.  For more information, please visit www.justice.gov/tribal/tta-ncai.html.

    Target Audience/Eligibility
    NCAI's primary target audience includes tribal leaders and criminal justice stakeholders (e.g., tribal law enforcement officials, tribal judges, tribal prosecutors, victim advocates, etc. ). Training and Technical assistance is not limited to tribes that have been awarded federal grants such as CTAS.

    DOJ Funding Agency(s)
    Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention
    Bureau of Justice Assistance

    Contact Information:

    P (202) 466-7767 | ncai@ncai.org

    Web www.ncai.org

  • Western Community Policing Institute (WCPI)

    DOJ Training area of focus: Law Enforcement and Intergovernmental Collaboration

    About WCPI
    Western Community Policing Institute (WCPI) was established in 1996 as one of the national networks of Regional Community Policing Institutes (RCPI). Located on the campus of Western Oregon University in
    Monmouth, OR, WCPI maintains the highest standards of training development by delivering national training courses that adhere to the adult learning principles, including problem-based learning, effectiveness of law enforcement agencies, and the communities they serve.

    Services Provided
    WCPI provides national training and technical support on issues vital to community safety.
    Existing training topics include:

    • Homeland Security
    • Community Policing
    • Ethics
    • Crime Prevention
    • Weed and Seed
    • Tribal Youth Leadership
    • Tribal Policing
    • Developing Teams
    • Domestic Violence

    WCPI receives funding from the Office of Community Oriented Policing (COPS) to provide tribal-specific training, including those focused on youth, executive leadership, and regional collaboration (Tribal Youth Leadership, Tribal Inspired Leadership Training, and Regional Collaboration and Tribal Partnerships).

    Tribal Inspired Leadership Training (TILT): This course is designed to increase Tribal Leaders’ capacity to leverage community policing in responding to the effects of local economic distress on public safety, and increase their capacity to address unique issues in a culturally sensitive and comprehensive community policing approach.

    Tribal Youth Leadership (TYL): This training is devised to advance the practice of community policing as an effective strategy in a communities’ efforts to improve public safety. TYL is designed to train and equip American Indian youth (middle and high school level) with the leadership skills necessary to address the public safety problems that plague tribal communities.

    Regional Collaboration to Embrace, Engage, and Sustain Tribal Community Policing Partnerships: This course is designed to provide technical assistance and regional training that focuses on building effective and efficient collaborative partnerships throughout Indian Country to address the unique public safety threats to tribal communities and their neighboring jurisdictions.

    Tribal Community Police/Teams: This training is designed to bring together Tribal Government, community members, and law enforcement in order to learn techniques on how to empower their communities to ethically identify and solve community problems through the use of community policing concepts, advocacy, and problem solving

    Also, WCPI receives from BJA to provide a proactive, comprehensive, and user-friendly BJA tribal training and technical assistance program that fosters collaboration among tribal, state, federal, and local governments.  TTA will focus on assisting tribes and or state, federal, and local governments in building collaborative partnerships, understanding and developing mutual aid agreements, protocols for inter-jurisdictional relationships, protocols for conducting community corrections-related activities, full faith, credit agreements, and any other associated activities.  TTA will also include core strategies or themes for developing collaborative tribal partnerships, team building, increasing coordination and communication among federal, state, tribal and local governmental agencies, and how to integrate and respect rich community values of tribal cultures.

    Target Audience/Eligibility
    WCPI’s primary target audience is federally recognized Native American and Alaskan Native tribes (“Tribes”) that have received grant funding through CTAS.  The target audience may include:

    • Public safety personnel
    • Governmental and non-governmental organizations
    • School and postsecondary education officials
    • Medical professionals
    • Tribal leaders
    • Community members

    Training and Technical assistance is not limited to tribes that have been awarded federal grants such as CTAS.

    DOJ Funding Agency(s)
    Bureau of Justice Assistance
    Office of Community Oriented Policing Services

    Contact Information:

    Brian Kaufman, Executive Director
    P (503) 751-4008 | kauffmab@wou.edu

    Ashley Jackson, Administrative Assistant
    P (503) 751-4011| jacksona@wou.edu

    Web www.westernrcpi.com

    Web www.tribaltraining.com

Information Sharing

  • National Center for Rural Law Enforcement, Criminal Justice Institute-University of Arkansas System (NCRLE)

    DOJ Training area of focus: Information Sharing

    About NCRLE
    The Tribal Justice Information Sharing System (TJISS) is administered by the National Center for
    Rural Law Enforcement, a center within the Criminal Justice Institute, a division of the University of
    Arkansas System. The TJISS program provides training and technical assistance to tribal law enforcement and tribal criminal justice practitioners. A two day hands-on course titled Crime Data Collection and Reporting is delivered at tribal locations nationwide. Technical assistance is available on-line from the program website at www.tjiss.net or by calling (800) 635-6310. Numerous resources for tribal law enforcement agencies are also available by request from the program website. Tribes interested in hosting the crime data collection and reporting training should contact the program administrator by e-mail or call the toll free help desk.

    Services Provided
    The Tribal Justice Information Sharing System is a project designed to provide training and technical assistance resources to Tribal law enforcement and other Tribal criminal justice practitioners nationwide. Technical assistance is available on-line from our existing web site www.tjiss.net or by calling our toll free help desk at 1-877-47-TJISS (85477). A Crime Data Collection and Reporting video tutorial and an electronic manual for training purposes are also available from the project web site. The tutorial and video provide Tribal law enforcement personnel with tools to assist them in learning to collect and report their crime data by use of UCR or NIBRS. Technical assistance available upon request includes the following:

    • Model policies and procedures
    • Job descriptions
    • Mutual aid agreements
    • Work schedules
    • Agency technology self -assessment work sheets
    • Tribal Justice Information Sharing Training and Technical Assistance Needs Assessment
    • Mentoring for new Tribal chiefs of police
    • Tribal Share list serve available to Tribal Criminal Justice Practitioners
    In addition to the Crime Data Collection and Reporting video tutorial and an electronic manual for training purposes the project staff is in the process of developing a two (2) day hands-on Crime Data Collection and Reporting training course which will be delivered at ten (10) Tribal locations nationwide. The dates and locations of these course deliveries are not yet determined, however will be marketed nationwide and posted to the project web site well in advance of each training date. This course will be delivered utilizing a blended learning approach that incorporates instructor led classroom lecture in conjunction with hands-on lab applications by use of a mobile computer training lab.

    Target Audience/Eligibility
    The National Center for Rural Law Enforcement target audience includes Tribal law enforcement personnel and Tribal criminal justice practitioners. Training and Technical assistance is not limited to tribes that have been awarded federal grants such as CTAS.

    DOJ Funding Agency(s)
    Bureau of Justice Assistance

    Contact Information:

    Dr. Cheryl May, Director
    P (501) 570-8052 | cpmay@cji.edu

    Jimmy Nobles, Program Administrator
    P (501) 570-8058 | jwnobles@cji.edu

    Web www.tjiss.net

  • Institute for Intergovernmental Research (IIR)

    DOJ Training area of focus: Criminal Justice Research, Training, Technical Assistance, and Information Sharing

    About IIR
    The Institute for Intergovernmental Research (IIR) specializes in developing and implementing strategic solutions that promote greater efficiency and effectiveness among federal, state, local, and tribal criminal justice agencies.  IIR excels in providing research, training, and technical assistance in the areas of intelligence gathering, grants administration, information sharing, and privacy concerns.

    Services Provided
    IIR hosts and manages the Tribe and Territory Sex Offender Registry System (TTSORS) and the Dru Sjodin National Sex Offender Public Website (NSOPW).  TTSORS assists eligible Native American tribes with substantially implementing the technical requirements of the Sex Offender Registration and Notification Act (SORNA).  TTSORS provides participating tribes with a full-functioning sex offender management system and public sex offender registry website that complies with the provisions of SORNA.  NSOPW is a national sex offender search website that provides users with access to the public sex offender information from over 150 registration jurisdictions from a single search interface.  NSOPW users can search for registered sex offender by name, city, county, zip code, state, and address.    

    Target Audience/Eligibility
    IIR's primary target audience for these services is states, U.S. Territories, the District of Columbia, and federally recognized Native American tribes that have elected to become sex offender registration jurisdictions under the Sex Offender Registration and Notification Act (SORNA).

    DOJ Funding Agency(s)

    Office on Sex Offender Sentencing, Monitoring, Apprehending, Registering and Tracking

    Contact Information:
     P (850) 385-0600| AWA-Request@iir.com

    Web www.iir.com

Sex Offender Registration and Notification Act

  • Fox Valley Technical College, National Criminal Justice Training Center (FVTC)

    DOJ Training area of focus: Law Enforcement, Public Safety and Community Corrections, Tribal Justice Systems and Professionals, and Tribal Human Service Professionals

    About FVTC
    Fox Valley Technical College (FVTC) is one of the leading national trainers and educators in law enforcement today. Through its criminal justice centers and programs, FVTC has delivered best-practice training and technical assistance since 1983. To better serve its customers including law enforcement, corrections and courts, FVTC recently reorganized these programs and centers of the college to structure them within the new National Criminal Justice Training Center (NCJTC). The programs implemented through NCJTC encompass federally funded training and technical assistance programs and services, contract and cost recovery training.  Each operation within NCJTC specializes in a particular set of issues critical to the criminal justice field. The training and technical assistance programs are dedicated to improve the knowledge, skills, capability, capacity, and leadership potential of our nation’s criminal justice professionals and systems.

    Services Provided
    The National Criminal Justice Training Center, Fox Valley Technical College received 2011-2012 fiscal funding to provide training and program assistance to tribal jurisdictions for the purpose of developing systems to substantially implement the Sex Offender Registration and Notification Act (SORNA).

    FVTC helps tribes work to enhance their justice-system collaboration internally, with other tribes, with local non-tribal jurisdictions, and with state/federal partners and agencies.  A wide array of training and assistance opportunities are available, including topics that relate to program development or enhancement as well as to building partnerships and relationships for community safety. Assistance is available in a variety of formats, including local, regional and national training and conferences; subject-matter technical assistance, meeting facilitation, event planning, and support for strategic planning.

    Subject-matter expertise includes: sex offender registration and management;  community and Council buy-in, community notification and public education; team development and processes; relationship building; coordinating collection and submission to national databases; form development; code development/review; registration process/program; sustaining programs beyond grant funding; and navigating resources available.

    Target Audience/Eligibility
    FVTC’s primary target audience is federally recognized Native American and Alaskan Native tribes (“Tribes”) that are working on implementing SORNA at this time; including those tribes that have been found to have substantially implemented the SORNA requirements.

    DOJ Funding Agency(s)

    Office on Sex Offender Sentencing, Monitoring, Apprehending, Registering and Tracking (SMART)

    Contact Information:

    Devin Rieckmann-Sell, Project Specialist
     P (888) 370-1752 | rieckman@fvtc.edu

    Rebecca Murdock, Program Manager
    P (920) 735-2517 | murdock@fvtc.edu

    Web www.fvtc.edu/sorna

  • Institute for Intergovernmental Research (IIR)

    DOJ Training area of focus: Criminal Justice Research, Training, Technical Assistance, and Information Sharing

    About IIR
    The Institute for Intergovernmental Research (IIR) specializes in developing and implementing strategic solutions that promote greater efficiency and effectiveness among federal, state, local, and tribal criminal justice agencies.  IIR excels in providing research, training, and technical assistance in the areas of intelligence gathering, grants administration, information sharing, and privacy concerns.

    Services Provided
    IIR hosts and manages the Tribe and Territory Sex Offender Registry System (TTSORS) and the Dru Sjodin National Sex Offender Public Website (NSOPW).  TTSORS assists eligible Native American tribes with substantially implementing the technical requirements of the Sex Offender Registration and Notification Act (SORNA).  TTSORS provides participating tribes with a full-functioning sex offender management system and public sex offender registry website that complies with the provisions of SORNA.  NSOPW is a national sex offender search website that provides users with access to the public sex offender information from over 150 registration jurisdictions from a single search interface.  NSOPW users can search for registered sex offender by name, city, county, zip code, state, and address.    

    Target Audience/Eligibility
    IIR's primary target audience for these services is states, U.S. Territories, the District of Columbia, and federally recognized Native American tribes that have elected to become sex offender registration jurisdictions under the Sex Offender Registration and Notification Act (SORNA).

    DOJ Funding Agency(s)

    Office on Sex Offender Sentencing, Monitoring, Apprehending, Registering and Tracking

    Contact Information
     P (850) 385-0600| AWA-Request@iir.com

    Web www.iir.com

Domestic and Sexual Violence Crimes

  • American Indian Resource Center's Institute for Native Justice

    DOJ Training areas of focus: Victim Advocacy, Tribal Courts, Program Capacity Building, Sustainability Planning, Safety Planning and Practice For Courts And Individuals, Networking and Community Response, Incorporating Culture into Practice and Response, Ethical and Confidential Advocacy Practice
    About the Institute for Native Justice

    The Institute for Native Justice (INJ) was created as a new division of the American Indian Resource Center in 2005; located in Tahlequah, Oklahoma, the purpose of INJ is to offer training and technical assistance to improve the safety and justice response for victims of domestic and sexual violence in Indian Country.  This effort is in response to DOJ reports and reports from Amnesty International that American Indian and Alaska Native women were being sexually assaulted at a rate two to three times that of any other racial or ethnic group.  INJ offers on-site, telephonic and conference workshops focused on creating improved victim-centered safety, privacy and practice for tribes who serve victims of domestic and sexual violence.  INJ’s focus is on promoting the agency of tribal women and leaders to address the issues facing them with crimes of domestic and sexual violence; focused on culture specific strategies that support victims and hold offenders accountable.  The TTA efforts of INJ are dedicated to improving the knowledge, skills, leadership and capacity of tribal programs and their staff. 

    Services Provided

    To reach tribal communities, INJ has developed online training offering basic skills instruction to tribal victim advocates and tribal court judges.  This online training project entitled “Advocacy Online Training” provides a “head start” allowing tribal court and advocate staff to more effectively utilize precious training dollars.  They are given a basic overview prior to attending advanced training at regional and national conferences. 

    The Native Voices Project is a focused discussion format designed to improve the working relationships with and for advocates and law enforcement charged with responding to crimes of domestic and sexual violence in Indian Country.  The Native Voices project offers the first video series of crime scenarios that utilize cases from Indian Country, performed by identifiable Native American actors.  The discussion series is designed to be facilitated by a local training team comprised of an advocate and a law enforcement officer.

    The programs implemented through INJ encompass federally funded training and technical assistance programs and services targeting tribal and rural communities and their development.  Each project of INJ specializes in a particular focus such as advocacy or tribal court development.

    INJ relies on three foundational strategies to provide TTA services for tribal communities—Safety, Ethics and Sustainability.  INJ services help to analyze needs, identify gaps in services and assets, and create community-based strategies that promote community driven, culture specific responses to crimes of domestic and sexual violence. 

    Safety is considered at all levels and is the centerpiece of our effort. INJ’s curriculums of effective safety practices include planning, strategies, and community networking that emphasize confidentiality and privacy at all levels of development.  Ethical practice is interwoven into all of our TTA services providing guidance to tribes to support the independence and agency of Native American women in need of crisis and safety services.  Sustainability, the third component of our work, supports the safety and ethics part of INJ TTA services.  Sustainability is about offering safe, effective, confidential and ethical services that tribal communities trust and rely on for a consistent continuum of care.

    INJ promotes effective TTA services by partnering with several national TTA providers.  Current partners include but are not limited to:

    • International Association of Forensic Nurses
    • National Center for Victims of Crime
    • South West Center for Law and Policy
    • Mending the Sacred Hoop
    • Tribal Law and Policy Institute
    • ACKCO
    • Unified Solutions
    • Red Wind Consulting
    • National Alliance for Cyber-security
    • National Criminal Justice Association
    • Fox Valley Technical College
    • University of North Dakota

    The Office on Violence Against Women (OVW) funds INJ to deliver TTA services for grantees of the Grants to Tribal Governments program and ARRA grantees.  The Bureau of Justice Assistance supports the Tribal Resources and Court Enhancement Strategies project which delivers TTA services for tribal courts which focus on court safety.

    The Work of INJ in Tribal Communities

    Program Support
    • Peer-to-peer support (information exchange and mentoring for individuals and groups or with multiple                     jurisdictions)
    • Outreach Tool Box with Public Service Announcements, fact sheets, educational handouts
    • Workshops and training events (agenda development, speaker identification, and logistical support)
    • Curriculum development

    Program Development
    • Diversion and prevention programs
    • Resource development and grant writing strategies to promote sustainability

    Strategic Planning
    • Community development and assessment strategies
    • Capacity and team building

    Specialized Training Topical Areas
    • Victim Advocacy Skills Development
    • Safety Planning for Individuals
    • Incorporating Culture into Programs
    • Overview of Domestic Violence, Sexual Assault, Stalking and Dating Violence
    • Restorative justice
    • Tribal Court Safety Assessment and Planning
    • The Impact of Policy on Domestic and Sexual Violence Victims

    Target Audience/Eligibility
    The Institute for Native Justice is authorized to provide TTA services for OVW Grants to Tribal Government grantees, federally recognized tribes with tribal courts or desiring to develop tribal courts and tribal programs funded under ARRA.

    Funding Agency(s)

    Office on Violence Against Women
    Bureau of Justice Assistance

    Contact Information:

    Pam Moore, Institute Director, Institute for Native Justice
    P: 918.207.9177 | Iwaduli@yahoo.com

    Darrell Dowty, TRACES Project Director
    P: 918.931.8455 | dowtyd@sbcglobal.net

    Robin Gann, Training Coordinator
    P: 918.708.1708| rgann@aircinc.org

    John Sawney, Project Specialist
    P: 918.774.5675 | johnsawney@gmail.com 

    Shawn Soulsby, IT Specialist
    P: 972.369.4248 | ssoulby@iaiwa-us.com  

    Webwww.institutefornativejustice.org

  • Red Wind Consulting, Inc.

    DOJ Training area of focus: Transitional housing and shelter development and implementation, sexual assault response teams, sexual assault services, protocol development.

    About RED WIND
    Red Wind is a 501c3 nonprofit, incorporated in Colorado, August 2005, and works extensively with Tribes and Alaskan Native villages on addressing violence against Native women.

    Red Wind's vision is to strengthen Tribal programs and Native organizations' ability to develop and enhance local responses to address and prevent domestic violence, sexual assault and stalking. In this effort, Red Wind is committed to building the leadership of indigenous women, defining and guiding its work from traditions and values that carry the strength and essence of native women while recognizing that we must work across our community to bring everyone back into our circle of life.

    To this end, Red Wind recognizes the power nature of domestic violence and sexual violence, as well as the role of community leadership in guiding and shaping responses to healing years of oppression playing itself out today. Red Wind is well versed in understanding the kinds of issues, practices and activities that may compromise victim safety and has a depth of experience working with Tribes to address victim survivor safety and confidentiality.

    Services Provided
    Red Wind Consulting offers a range of methods for supporting and enhancing your ability to conduct your work. There is no one-way to do things and Red Wind recognizes that each community is unique in its own way. We are very skilled at being able to work with you across great distances.

    Red Wind was developed to bring additional resources to ending violence against women work while enhancing the capacity of Tribal and Native specific programs. Red Wind has partnerships with a range of highly experienced and knowledgeable consultants. Many have experience being involved in the development of local programs and responses to end violence against indigenous women as well as offering national technical assistance and training. We match consultants to bring you the level of expertise you want to meet your local needs.

    Program Support
    • Peer-to-peer support (information exchange and mentoring for individuals and groups or with multiple jurisdictions)
    • Publication drafting and dissemination
    • Workshops and training events (agenda development, speaker identification, and logistical support)
    • Curriculum development

    Program Development
    • Developing programs and organizations
    • Long range planning, strategic planning
    • Visioning, designing mission/vision for your program or organization
    • Designing and implementing shelters and transitional housing (from the ground up including property and program)
    • Designing and implementing supervised visitation centers
    • Emergency shelter and transitional housing programs
    • Supervised visitation programs
    • Resource development and grant writing strategies to promote sustainability

    Strategic Planning
    • Long term visioning and planning
    • Community development and assessment strategies
    • Capacity and team building Advocacy
    • Developing advocacy responses
    • Core philosophies for providing advocacy for victims of DV and SA
    • Developing and facilitating women's groups for DV victims
    • Safety planning
    • Technology safety planning

    Criminal Justice System

    • Designing and implementing Coordinated Community Response (CCR)
    • Advocate role in coordinating, managing, leading a CCR
    • Working across multidisciplinary teams

    Sexual Assault
    • Victim care and support
    • Developing Sexual Assault Response Team (SART)
    • SART protocol development and implementation strategies
    • Developing Sexual Assault Forensic Exam protocols

    Public Awareness and Outreach
    • Building community support to address DV and SA
    • Designing materials
    • Designing your message
    • Developing public awareness campaigns

    Program Evaluation
    • Developing logic models
    • Designing program evaluation strategies
    • Provide evaluation tools
    • Conduct evaluation analysis

    Target Audience/Eligibility
    RED WIND offers services for federally recognized tribes to:

    • Develop and/or improve tribal justice and public safety programs through comprehensive planning;
    • Create programs that prevent, address and reduce domestic violence, sexual assault, elder abuse related crime; and
    • Assist tribal governments to build the capacity to operate criminal justice responses to enhance victim safety and hold offenders accountable.

    Tribes do not have to receive CTAS or other DOJ funding to be eligible for these TTA resources.

    Funding Agency(s)

    Office on Violence against Women (OVW)

    Contact Information

    Victoria Ybanez, Executive Director
    P (866) 599-9650 x214 | ybanez@red-wind.net

    Ronald Templin, Administrative and Logistical Coordinator
    P (866) 599-9650 x212 | ronte@red-wind.net

    Web www.red-wind.net

  • Southwest Center for Law and Policy

    DOJ/OVW Training areas of focus: Legal training and technical assistance to improve safety and justice for American Indian/Alaskan Native (AI/NA) victims of sexual and domestic violence, stalking, elder abuse, teen dating violence, firearms violence, elder abuse, and abuse of persons with disabilities.

    About Southwest Center for Law and Policy
    The Southwest Center for Law and Policy (SWCLAP) is a non-profit 501(c) 3 organization based in Tucson, Arizona. Since 2002, SWCLAP has been providing legal training and technical assistance, on a national level, to OVW grantees serving American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) victims of sexual and domestic violence, stalking, elder abuse, teen dating violence, firearms violence, elder abuse, and abuse of persons with disabilities.  SWCLAP is the parent organization of the National Tribal Trial College (NTTC), The National Indian Country Clearinghouse on Sexual Assault (NICCSA), and SAFESTAR (Sexual Assault Forensic Examinations, Services, Training, Access, and Resources).

    Services Provided
    National Tribal Trial College (NTTC): Southwest Center for Law and Policy provides free legal training on domestic and sexual violence, stalking, abuse of persons with disabilities, federal firearms violations, and elder abuse through the National Tribal Trial College (NTTC). Free, interactive, skills based legal training at the NTTC is held at locations across the country for criminal and civil justice professionals, courts, law enforcement, healthcare providers, advocates and allied professionals.  All courses are taught by Indian Country experts on the effective litigation and investigation of violence committed against American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) women. Participants learn important legal skills in small, discipline specific groups to advance safety and justice for American Indian/Alaska Native victims. Free Continuing Legal Education, Law Enforcement Training Units, CEUs, and CMEs are available.  Priority for enrollment in the free, 2 day, interactive courses is given to Office on Violence Against Women grantees.  Tentatively scheduled upcoming Free Legal Training Institutes are as follows:

    Litigating and Asserting Victim Rights in Tribal, State, Federal, and CFR Courts (tentatively scheduled for August 2013 in Seattle, Washington)
    Qualifying and Testifying Effectively as an Expert Witness on Domestic Violence in Tribal, State, and Federal Courts (tentatively scheduled for October/November, 2013 in Tucson, Arizona)
    Legal and Victim Advocacy for Special Needs American Indian/Alaska Native Victims of Sexual Violence: Seriously Mentally Ill and Cognitively Impaired Victims (With or Without a History of Substance and/or Alcohol Abuse) (tentatively scheduled for Albuquerque, New Mexico in March 2014)
    Effective Litigation of Protection Orders for American Indian/Alaska Victims (tentatively scheduled for Anchorage, Alaska in Summer of 2014 and focusing on the special needs of Alaska Native victims)

    National Indian Country Clearinghouse on Sexual Assault (NICCSA): NICSSA is currently in the final development and approval phase and is anticipated to launch in 2013.  The project includes a toll-free, national hotline staffed by Indian Country legal, healthcare, and advocacy experts as well as an expansive, user-friendly website containing resources, articles, and information on effective responses to and prevention of sexual violence against American Indian/Alaska Native women.
    The National Indian Country Clearinghouse on Sexual Assault (NICCSA) is a comprehensive, one-stop resource for Indian Country legal practitioners, victim advocates, law enforcement officers, judges, and Sexual Assault Nurse Examiners that is accessible by dial-up, high speed internet, and smart phones.    Once completed, NICCSA will offer:

    • A user-friendly, easy to navigate website that serves as a compendium of pertinent federal statutes, tribal codes, state laws, federal policies, court rules, federal and tribal case law, articles, policy papers, directives, and other resources
    • A hotline for answering legal, advocacy, and forensic questions available toll free to Indian Country practitioners eight hours per day. 

    NICCSA Advocacy: SWCLAP will expand the training offered by the National Indian Country Clearinghouse on Sexual Assault by developing and delivering a free, three-part national course on basic and advanced sexual assault advocacy for American Indian/Alaska Native victims. 

    This 3-part course will utilize Native American adult learning principles and will feature:

    • 12 webinars on topics related to effective sexual assault victim advocacy for American Indian/Alaska Native victims
    • An on-line, interactive tribal legal and advocacy course able to be accessed by dial-up and high speed internet
    • A weeklong, 40 hour, in-person training Institute for up to 20 victim advocates who have successfully completed the on-line course and webinar series.

    SAFESTAR (Sexual Assault Forensic Examinations, Services, Training, Access, and Resources): SAFESTAR is a unique model of care that draws upon the strength and resilience of Indigenous women to improve safety and justice outcomes for victims of sexual violence and to provide long-term, compassionate, culturally meaningful, holistic care.  Those American Indian/Alaska Native communities that currently have the capacity to support a Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner (SANE) are provided with free, comprehensive technical assistance to develop an effective Sexual Assault Response Team and protocol that includes seamless access to SANE services.  For those American Indian/Alaska Native communities currently without the capacity to support universal access to SANE services, the SAFESTAR project provides intensive training and technical support to specially selected laypersons and traditional healthcare providers to:

    • Deliver emergency First Aid to sexual assault survivors
    • Provide referrals for follow-up medical and other care
    • Educate communities on the harm caused by sexual violence and lead the way back to healthy, respectful ways of living
    • Collect sexual assault forensic evidence to promote increased accountability for perpetrators

    Southwest Center for Law and Policy offers a SAFESTAR Office on Violence Against Women approved 40-hour, intensive training course delivered by Sexual Assault Nurse Examiners (SANEs), lawyers, Native community health experts, advocates, traditional healers, and experts on tribal governance and community organizing. The 40-hour course covers emergency First Aid (utilizing the American Heart Association's curriculum); anatomy;  an overview of the prevalence, dynamics and responses to the epidemic of sexual violence in American Indian/Alaska Native communities;  forensic evidence collection; health care referrals; confidentiality; federal and tribal sexual assault laws; service referrals; and community outreach.  The curriculum incorporates many of the same components of the Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner (SANE) certification course, but is designed for qualified laypersons in American Indian/Alaska Native communities. The SAFESTAR course is delivered on-site and is free of charge to American Indian/ Alaska Native communities that have successfully completed an application process through the Southwest Center for Law and Policy and the Office on Violence Against Women.

    Target Audience/Eligibility
    Southwest Center on Law and Policy (www.swclap.org) provides telephonic, email, and on-site legal training and technical assistance on effective responses to domestic and sexual violence, stalking, abuse of persons with disabilities, firearms prohibitions, protection orders, and abuse of elders committed against American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) victims.  Customized, United States Department of Justice (Office on Violence Against Women) approved training curricula can also be delivered on-site to tribal nations. Free Continuing Legal Education, Law Enforcement Training Units, CEUs, and CMEs are available for most training modules. SWCLAP can also assist in developing multi-disciplinary and/or inter-jurisdictional responses to violence against AI/AN victims.

    For a more complete list of available training and technical assistance topics, please visit:  http://swclap.org/pdfs/List%20of%20available%20training%20with%20new%20address.pdf

    Funding Agency

    Office on Violence Against Women

    Contact Information

    Hallie Bongar White, Executive Director
    P (520) 623-8192 | bongarwhite@swclap.org

    Arlene O'Brien (Tohono O'odham Nation), Director of Programming
    P (520) 623-8192 | obrien@swclap.org

    Web: www.swclap.org, www.safestar.net

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Grants and Financial Training

In addition to subject matter-based TTA resources and tools to assist tribes with programmatic issues related to project implementation, DOJ offers grant management-related training and technical assistance regarding the grant application process, grant management, and financial management.

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TTA Events

Sex Offender Management: A United Effort

Event Date(s): June 4, 2014
Time: 3:00pm EDT - 4:30pm EDT
Event Title: Sex Offender Management: A United Effort
Location: Webinar
Audience: Participants may include federal, state, local, and tribal personnel from: Law enforcement, probation & parole, prosecution, courts, victim services, community programs, and treatment as well as other officials who manage sex offenders.
Type of Event: Open - Registration Required
Host Agency(s): The US Department of Justice, Office of Sex Offender Sentencing, Monitoring, Apprehending, Registering and Tracking (SMART)
Event Details:

This presentation will give participants an overview of the responsibilities and ongoing initiatives of the US Department of Justice’s Office of Sex Offender Sentencing, Monitoring, Apprehending, Registering and Tracking (SMART). The presentation will provide insight on the current status of sex offender management around the country. In addition, this webinar will:

  • Examine facts and myths regarding sex offenders
  • Discuss types of offenders
  • Discuss the impact of sex offenses on victims
  • Explore approaches to managing sex offenders and protecting communities from sexual violence

https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/146080192

Funding Agency(s): The US Department of Justice, Office of Sex Offender Sentencing, Monitoring, Apprehending, Registering and Tracking (SMART)

 

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