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Justice News

Department of Justice
U.S. Attorney’s Office
District of Alaska

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday, August 22, 2013

inmate sentenced to nine additional years in prison for filing false tax refund claims and aggravated identity theft

Anchorage, Alaska - U.S. Attorney Karen L. Loeffler announced that an Anchorage man was sentenced today to a total of nine years in prison for conspiracy to defraud the government and aggravated identity theft.  

Steven James McComb, 47, of Anchorage, Alaska, was sentenced today by U.S. District Court Chief Judge Ralph R. Beistline to 84 months in prison for conspiracy to defraud the government with respect to claims and mail fraud, and a consecutive sentence of 24 months prison for aggravated identity theft.  McComb pled guilty to these offenses in June 2013.  In addition to his prison sentence, a monetary judgment of $110,698 was entered against McComb and an Order of Forfeiture was entered for $23,160 which had been seized from U.S. Bank in April 2011. McComb was also ordered to pay restitution in the amount of $110,698. 

According to filings with the court, while McComb was a State prisoner he participated in a conspiracy to obtain tax refunds by filing fraudulent income tax returns.  Between January 2010 and January 2012, McComb and co-conspirators prepared and submitted approximately 100 false tax returns claiming refunds of over $210,000.

Court documents revealed that McComb obtained the names and social security numbers of individuals, many of whom were fellow inmates at State correctional facilities.  McComb then provided that information to other co-conspirators outside of the prison system to prepare false individual income tax returns.  McComb authorized the co-conspirators to retain a portion of the money from the refunds, and directed them to wire or mail the remainder of the refunds to other co-conspirators or to hold the money for him.

McComb and co-conspirators Helen Delores Maloney, Paulando Ramone Williams, and Michael Lee Sexton were all indicted by a federal grand jury in February 2013 for conspiracy to defraud the government with respect to false claims, mail fraud, and aggravated identity theft. Their current status is as follows:

  • Maloney pled guilty to conspiracy to defraud the government with respect to claims and mail fraud in April 2013 and was sentenced to 28 months in prison on July 2, 2013;
  • Williams pled guilty to conspiracy to defraud the government with respect to claims, mail fraud, and aggravated identity theft on August 21, 2013, and is scheduled to be sentenced on November 4, 2013; and
  • Sexton is pending arraignment and trial.

 
“Committing tax fraud and identity theft while in prison is a recipe for disaster,” said Kenneth J. Hines, Special Agent in Charge of IRS Criminal Investigation in the Pacific Northwest.  “This sentence shows that tax crimes are a serious matter that could result in years behind bars.”

Ms. Loeffler commends the Internal Revenue Service, Criminal Investigation for conducting the investigation leading to successful prosecution of McComb.

Updated January 29, 2015