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Justice News

Department of Justice
U.S. Attorney’s Office
Northern District of Florida

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday, July 11, 2014

Miami Resident Sentenced to Five Years in Federal Prison for Tax Fraud

TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA – Pamela C. Marsh, United States Attorney for the Northern District of Florida, announced that Ashley Assgill Glover, 29, of Miami, Florida, was sentenced to five years in federal prison after pleading guilty to one count of theft of government property, one count of possession of unauthorized devices, and one count of aggravated identity theft.

U.S. District Court Judge Mark Walker sentenced Glover on July 10, 2014, to a five year prison term followed by three years of supervised release.   Glover was also ordered to pay the Internal Revenue Service restitution in the amount of $216,031. 

On March 12, 2012, the Tallahassee Police Department stopped Glover, and found her in possession a list of more than 800 victims’ personal identifying information (PII).  There were also debit cards loaded with tax refunds linked to fraudulent tax returns.  Sixty fraudulent tax returns were filed during the 2012 tax season in the names of victims on the list.  These returns claimed approximately $369,848 in fraudulent refunds.

In June 2012, Glover was stopped by Coral Springs Police Department and found in possession of a list including over 160 victims’ PII.  In November 2012, Glover was stopped by the Florida Department of Agriculture and found in possession of yet another list containing over 600 victims’ PII.

During the 2012 tax season, there were 206 fraudulent tax returns filed using information from the three recovered lists seeking approximately $1,246,417 in fraudulent refunds.  Fortunately, the Internal Revenue Service detected most of the fraudulent tax returns and stopped the issuance of more than a million dollars in fraudulent refunds.

U.S. Attorney Marsh praised the work of the Tallahassee Police Department, the United States Secret Service, the Internal Revenue Service, and the Florida Department of Agriculture, whose joint investigation led to the convictions in the case.

The case was prosecuted by Assistant U.S. Attorney Winifred L. Acosta Nesmith.

Updated January 26, 2015