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Justice News

Department of Justice
U.S. Attorney’s Office
Northern District of Ohio

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday, February 6, 2013

Two Men Charged With Illegally Re-Entering The U.S.

Steven M. Dettelbach, United States Attorney for the Northern District of Ohio, today announced that criminal charges were filed against two men accused in separate incidents of illegally re-entering the United States following deportation or removal.

An indictment alleges that on Jan. 5, 2013, Hector Sanchez-Soto, 47, formerly of Cleveland, was illegally present in the United States after previously being deported subsequent to a conviction for the commission of illegal re-entry following deportation or removal.

Another indictment alleges that on Jan. 7, 2013, Concepcion Quevedo-Rodriguez, age 44, of Guatemala, was illegally present in the United States after previously being deported subsequent to a conviction for the commission of illegal re-entry following deportation or removal.

An indictment is only a charge and is not evidence of guilt. A defendant is entitled to a fair trial in which it will be the government’s burden to prove guilt beyond a reasonable doubt.

The Sanchez-Soto case is being handled by Assistant United States Attorney Lauren Bell after investigation by United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

The Queved0-Rodriguez case is being handled by Assistant United States Attorney Alissa M. Sterling following an investigation by United States Border Patrol, Sandusky, Ohio.

If convicted, the defendant’s sentence will be determined by the Court after review of factors unique to the case, including the defendant’s prior criminal record, if any, the defendant’s role in the offense, and the characteristics of the violation. In all cases the sentence will not exceed the statutory maximum and in most cases it will be less than the maximum.

An indictment is only a charge and is not evidence of guilt. A defendant is entitled to a fair trial in which it will be the government’s burden to prove guilt beyond a reasonable doubt.

Updated March 12, 2015