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The prosecution of tax cases continues as the april 15 deadline approaches

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
April 12, 2013

DENVER – U.S. Attorney John Walsh and IRS Criminal Investigation Special Agent in Charge Stephen Boyd announce the prosecution of several criminal tax offenders this week in the District of Colorado.  As the deadline for filing tax returns is this Monday, federal officials remind citizens that it is important to file complete and accurate tax returns.  Those who deliberately evade this obligation will be criminally prosecuted.

Recent tax cases prosecuted in the District of Colorado include the following:

Elizabeth A. Eurioste, age 62, of Aurora, Colorado, who was indicted by a federal grand jury in Denver on April 9, 2013 for aiding and assisting in preparing false Form 1040 U.S. Individual Income Tax Returns for years 2006 and 2007.  She willfully advised her clients and prepared for them false tax returns, including false deductions, overstated expenses and false business losses when in fact the taxpayers were not entitled to the deductions which resulted in the under-reporting of taxable income.  She falsified losses as much as $158,374 on a single 2007 Form 1040 U.S. Individual Income Tax Return.  She was charged with twenty counts of aiding and assisting in the preparing of false tax returns which carries a penalty of not more than 3 years imprisonment, and a fine of up to $250,000 per count.

James Stanley Golob, age 54, of Pueblo, Colorado, was charged by Information on April 11, 2013 with income tax evasion for calendar year 2007.  According to the information, Golob took a variety of measures to avoid the assessment and payment of income tax $586,618 of income generated during 2007 through rental properties and through his roofing business, including paying his mortgage, utilities, and other personal expenses from business accounts, titling his home in family member’s name, and filing a false tax return for 2007 in which he falsely reported total compensation for the year of $13,800.  Income tax evasion carries a penalty of not more than 5 years imprisonment, and a fine of up to $250,000.

Daniel Dinner, age 61, of Denver, Colorado, was charged by Information on April 12, 2013 with willfully filing a false U.S. individual income tax return for calendar year 2009.  According to the information, Dinner’s return falsely reported his net income as $17,495, which resulted in a tax deficiency of approximately $28,810.  He faces a penalty of not more than 3 years imprisonment, and a fine of up to $250,000.

Richard K. Sears, age 64, of Parker, Colorado, was formally charged by criminal Information on April 12, 2013 with three counts of willfully failing to file U.S. individual income tax returns.  Failing to file U.S. individual income tax returns carries a penalty of not more than 1 year imprisonment, and a fine of up to $100,000 per count.

“As citizens and residents of the United States, we all have an obligation to file tax returns, and to ensure that those tax returns are complete and accurate,” said U.S. Attorney John Walsh.

“Tax evasion is not a victimless crime; we all pay when others attempt to defraud the government,” said Stephen Boyd, Special Agent in Charge, IRS Criminal Investigation, Denver Field Office. “This is a reminder that all taxpayers should file complete and accurate tax returns.”

Charges in an indictment and information are allegations and the defendants are presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty.

The criminal cases are being prosecuted by Assistant United States Attorneys Anna K. Edgar, Matthew T. Kirsch, Suneeta Hazra and Tim R. Neff, respectively, all of the U.S. Attorney’s Office Economic Crimes Section for the District of Colorado, with assistance from Department of Justice Trial Attorney Kevin F. Sweeney.

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