News and Press Releases

Final Member of 13-Person Northwest Georgia Oxycodone
Distribution Ring Sentenced to Federal Prison

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
October 2, 2012

Rossville Resident, Terry Jamerson, Obtained Oxycodone Pills in Florida and Distributed them in Northwest Georgia and Elsewhere

ROME, Ga. - A Northwest Georgia man who distributed prescription narcotics that he illicitly obtained from pharmacies in Florida was sentenced today by United States District Judge Harold L. Murphy to three years in prison, and three years of supervised release, announced Sally Quillian Yates, United States Attorney for the Northern District of Georgia.  Terry Michael Jamerson, 65, of Rossville, Georgia, was convicted of these charges on August 11, 2011, upon his plea of guilty.  Jamerson is the last of thirteen defendants to be sentenced for their roles in an Oxycodone distribution ring based in Rossville, Georgia.

“Today’s sentence, as well as all the sentences imposed on the members of this pill distribution conspiracy, is a testament to the grave consequences of illegally dealing prescription drugs in our community,” said United States Attorney Sally Quillian Yates. “The abuse of prescription pills, especially Oxycodone, has risen to epidemic proportions in recent years. In Georgia, more people die from oxycodone abuse than die from all of the illicit drugs combined.  This tragedy is pronounced here in Northwest Georgia, where we have seen a significant percentage of those Oxycodone overdose deaths.  As prescription drug abuse continues to plague the communities in this district, our office will pursue all those involved in this illicit trade--from the corrupt pain clinic owner to the unethical doctor to the street level distributor.” 

Harry Sommers, DEA Special Agent in Charge of the Atlanta Field Division, said of the sentencing, “Oxycodone and other prescription narcotics are highly addictive and detrimental to the human body when abused.  People who traffic these pills are drug dealers in the truest sense of the term, and the Administration will do everything in its power to stifle the illicit distribution of prescription painkillers. DEA will continue to investigate and pursue anyone who distributes prescription pills with the same vigor as those who traffic cocaine, heroin, methamphetamine, and other drugs.”

According to United States Attorney Yates, the charges and other information presented in court: This case stems from a joint investigation conducted by agents of the Drug Enforcement Administration, officers of the Lookout Mountain Judicial Circuit Drug Task Force, and deputies of the Catoosa County Sheriff’s Office.  The investigation revealed that Jamerson was a member of a thirteen-person conspiracy that illegally distributed hundreds of thousands of Oxycodone pills throughout Northwest Georgia, Tennessee, West Virginia, and Kentucky, making hundreds of thousands of dollars in profits.  The organization obtained the vast majority of its pills from Florida. 

Jamerson’s role included driving rental cars to Florida on a monthly basis to be treated by doctors and obtain prescriptions for painkillers. Following the consultations with these doctors, Jamerson would fill prescriptions for Oxycodone and other drugs in Florida pharmacies, and then transport the pills back to the Northwest Georgia area.  There, Jamerson would distribute the pills to other members of the conspiracy who would then sell them for profit. 

The other members of the organization had previously been sentenced by Judge Murphy as follows:

  • John Gregory Alvarez, 46, was sentenced to 21 years, 10 months in prison to be followed by 6 years of supervised release. 
  • Jesse Wilburn Peardon, 34, was sentenced to 10 years, 1 month in prison to be followed by 3 years of supervised release. 
  • Billy Mac Crump, 65, was sentenced to 6 years, 6 months in prison to be followed by 3 years of supervised release. 
  • Gerald Pritchett, 52, was sentenced to 10 years in prison to be followed by 6 years of supervised release. 
  • Jeremy Pritchett, 26, was sentenced to 11 years, 4 months in prison to be followed by 3 years of supervised release. 
  • Roger Dale Damron, 55, was sentenced to 8 years, 2 months in prison to be followed by 3 years of supervised release. 
  • Paul Damron, 33, was sentenced to 3 years, 1 month in prison to be followed by 3 years of supervised release. 
  • Greg Damron, 33, was sentenced to 3 years, 1 month in prison to be followed by 3 years of supervised release. 
  • Kenis McPeek, 52, was sentenced to 5 years in prison to be followed by 3 years of supervised release. 
  • Will Bolleen, 27, was sentenced to 5 years in prison to be followed by 3 years of supervised release. 
  • Joe Baldwin, 44, was sentenced to 9 years in prison to be followed by 3 years of supervised release. 
  • Jordan Vaughn, 30, was sentenced to 3 years, 1 month in prison to be followed by 3 years of supervised release. 

The U.S. Attorney’s Office in Atlanta recommends parents and children learn about the dangers of drugs at the following web site: www.justthinktwice.com.

This case was investigated by Special Agents of the Drug Enforcement Administration, officers of the Lookout Mountain Judicial Circuit Drug Task Force, and deputies of the Catoosa County Sheriff’s Office.

Special Assistant United States Attorney C. Brock Brockington and Assistant United States Attorney G. Scott Hulsey prosecuted the case.

For further information please contact the U.S. Attorney’s Public Information Office at USAGAN.PressEmails@usdoj.gov or (404) 581-6016.  The Internet address for the HomePage for the U.S. Attorney's Office for the Northern District of Georgia is www.justice.gov/usao/gan.

 

 

 

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