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Two Chicago Men Sentenced for Conspiracy to Distribute Crack Cocaine in Quincy Area

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
February 20, 2008

Springfield, Ill. - Two men, formerly of Chicago, have been sentenced to federal prison for conspiring to distribute crack cocaine in the Quincy, Illinois area from July 2005 to April 2006. U.S. Attorney Rodger A. Heaton, Central District of Illinois, announced that Dwayne Jett, 23, was sentenced yesterday, February 19, 2008, to 209 months (17 years, 5 months) in prison and ordered to serve five years supervised release upon his release from prison. Jett’s co-defendant, Jermarel Jackson, 24, was sentenced on January 25, 2008, to 186 months (15 years, 6 months) and ordered to serve 10 years supervised release following his prison term.

Both defendants were charged in July 2006 with conspiracy to distribute 50 grams or more of crack cocaine from July 2005 until April 28, 2006. Each pled guilty to the offense: Jett on March 29, 2007; Jackson on March 28, 2007. Both have remained in the custody of the U.S. Marshals Service since a federal criminal complaint was filed against them on July 19, 2006.

During sentencing proceedings for each, the government noted prior felony convictions: Jett’s previous conviction in Cook county, Illinois in 2003 for aggravated unlawful use of a weapon; and, Jackson’s two prior drug felony convictions, also in Cook county, Illinois.

The federal case was the result of an investigation by the West Central Illinois Task Force and the Drug Enforcement Administration and was prosecuted by Assistant U.S. Attorney Gregory M. Gilmore with the cooperation of the Adams County State’s Attorney Jonathan Barnard.

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