News and Press Releases

Venice Man Sentenced To 30 Years For Possession Of A Firearm By A Convicted Felon

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
September 3, 2013

A Venice, Illinois, man was sentenced to a prison term in federal district court on August 30, 2013, for possession of a firearm by a convicted felon, the United States Attorney for the Southern District of Illinois, Stephen R. Wigginton, announced today.

Jason White, 28, was sentenced to 360 months in prison, to be followed by 5 years of supervised release, a $100 special assessment, and a fine of $1000. This sentencing followed White’s trial in June, 2013, in which a jury found White guilty of Possession of a Firearm by a Convicted Felon. The sentencing judge also ordered forfeiture of the firearm and the ammunition contained therein.

“I applaud this lengthy and well-deserved sentence which should ensure that an armed career criminal will no longer be a menace to the law-abiding citizens of Southern Illinois.” said United States Attorney Wigginton.

The charge related to an incident that occurred on March 22, 2011, in Brooklyn, Illinois, after White was involved in a fist fight with another man outside the Peek-A-Boo Lounge. The victim never learned the reason for the fight, but after the fight, when the victim arrived at his girlfriend’s house in Brooklyn, White approached the victim with a .40 caliber Glock semi-automatic pistol and shot him in the abdomen. The bullet went through the victim’s abdomen, and grazed the leg of the victim’s girlfriend. The victim was treated and has survived.

The victim identified the shooter as “Li’l Herm,” a nickname the police were able to associate with White. Police were able to locate a spent .40 caliber bullet from the girlfriend’s living room floor and a spent .40 caliber casing on the girlfriend’s porch.

About ten days after the Brooklyn shooting, White’s parole officer received a call from a woman who reported that White was at a gas station near Highways 270 and 157. The parole officer alerted the U.S. Marshal’s Task Force, who investigated and ultimately arrested White. Information from a relative of White led to the recovery of the Glock .40 caliber pistol.

At trial, a ballistics expert from the Illinois State Police Crime Lab provided expert testimony indicating that the spent bullet found in the girlfriend’s living room, and the spent casing found on her porch, had both been fired from the gun that the officers found.

United States Attorney Wigginton noted that White was sentenced under the Armed Career Criminal statute which provides for a sentence of 15 years to life when a defendant who has been found guilty of Possession of a Firearm by a Felon also has at least three prior serious drug or gun felonies. White had such prior convictions. “White, who is now 28, has committed at least one crime every year of his adult life except at age 20, and between ages 25 and 26, when he was in prison. Seemingly White has told us that the only way to protect ourselves is to ensure that he remains in prison.” stated Unites States Attorney Wigginton.

The judge noted that White used the gun in a highly aggressive and violent manner. The judge also highlighted White’s past conduct, the conduct in this case, concern for the community, and concern for deterrence and protection as factors he considered in imposing the sentence.

The case was investigated by members of the Brooklyn Police, the U.S. Marshal’s Service, and the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives. The case was prosecuted by Assistant U.S. Attorney Stephen B. Clark.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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