News and Press Releases

Indictment: Three Dealt Explosives
Without Federal License in Kansas City, Kan.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 

Aug. 9, 2012

TKANSAS CITY, KAN. – Three people have been charged with dealing in M-80s and other explosive materials without a federal explosives license in Kansas City, Kan., U.S. Attorney Barry Grissom said today.

Joseph E. Quinn, 45, Parkville, Mo., Patrick E. Quinn, 40, Kansas City, Kan., and Stacy L. Sewell, 41, Kansas City, Kan., are charged with one count of dealing in explosive materials without a license. In addition, Joseph E. Quinn is charged with one count of distributing explosive materials to another person without a license. The crimes are alleged to have occurred July 4, 2012, in Kansas City, Kan.

The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives published a fact sheet on illegal explosives devices in March 2012. The fact sheet stated: “Illegal explosive devices are often manufactured and used during the Fourth of July fireworks season. Due to their explosive material composition and unpredictability, they are inherently dangerous during their manufacture, transportation and use. Homemade explosive materials and products can pose a particular risk for injury since the persons manufacturing the devices often lack the knowledge, skills and experience required for such activities. Law enforcement agencies consider explosive devices such as M-80s, M-100s, quarter sticks, cherry bombs, silver salutes and other similar devices illegal because they exceed the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commissioner’s explosives wight limits for consumer fireworks.”

If convicted, the defendants face a maximum penalty of 10 years in federal prison and a fine up to $250,000. The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives investigated. Assistant U.S. Attorney Chris Oakley is prosecuting.


OTHER INDICTMENTS

Leslie Kingsley, II, 40, Tonganoxie, Kan., Kristy Sherley, 28, Kansas City, Kan., and Tino Soriano, 31, Coachella, Calif., are charged in a superseding indictment with one count of conspiracy to distribute methamphetamine and one count of attempted possession with intent to distribute methamphetamine. In addition, Michael Loveland, 36, Kansas City, Kan., is charged with maintaining a residence at 816 South 72nd Street in Kansas City, Kan., in furtherance of drug trafficking. The crimes are alleged to have occurred during January through March 2012 in Kansas City, Kan.

Upon conviction, the crimes carry the following penalties:
Conspiracy: Not less than 10 years and not more than life and a fine up to $4 million.
Attempted possession with intent to distribute: Not less than 10 years and not more than life and a fine up to $4 million.
Maintaining a residence in furtherance of drug trafficking: A maximum penalty of 20 years and a fine up to $500,000.

The Drug Enforcement Administration investigated. Assistant U.S. Attorney Sheri McCracken is prosecuting.

Edmund S. Nwaudobi, 49, Sugarland, Texas, is charged with failing to surrender to serve a sentence in federal prison. The crime is alleged to have occurred June 24, 2012.
Nwaudobi was convicted on charges of conspiracy, health care fraud and aggravated identity theft and sentenced to 75 months in federal prison.

If convicted on the new charge he faces an additional maximum penalty of 10 years and a fine up to $250,000. The FBI investigated. Assistant U.S. Attorney Chris Oakley is prosecuting.

Patrick A. Bedell, 38, Kansas City, Kan., is charged with one count of unlawful possession of a firearm after a felony conviction and one count of possession with intent to distribute marijuana. The crimes are alleged to have occurred May 13, 2012, in Kansas City, Kan.

If convicted, he faces a maximum penalty of 10 years in federal prison and a fine up to $250,000 on the firearms charge and a maximum penalty of five years and a fine up to $250,000 on the marijuana charge. The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives investigated. Assistant U.S. Attorney Dave Zabel is prosecuting.

Terry L. Webb, 42, Wichita, Kan., is charged with one count of bank robbery. The indictment alleges that on July 14, 2012, he robbed the Emprise Bank in Wichita, Kan.

Webb initially was charged in a criminal complaint filed July 20 in U.S. District Court in Wichita.

If convicted, he faces a maximum penalty of 20 years and a fine up to $250,000. The FBI investigated. Assistant U.S. Attorney Matt Treaster is prosecuting.

Timothy R. Whittington, 32, is charged with escaping from custody at the Grossman Community Corrections Center in Leavenworth, Kan. The crime is alleged to have occurred July 19, 2012.

If convicted, he faces an additional sentence of up to five years in federal prison and a fine up to $250,000. The U.S. Marshals Service investigated. Assistant U.S. Attorney Terra Morehead is prosecuting.

Alfredo Gomez-Granados, 60, is charged with unlawfully re-entering the United States after being deported. He was found July 24, 2012, in Kansas City, Kan.

If convicted, he faces a maximum of 20 years and a fine up to $250,000. The Department of Homeland Security investigated. Assistant U.S. Attorney Jabari Wamble is prosecuting.

Helen Long, 45, Overland Park, Kan., is charged with fraudulently making false entries in accounts and official records while she was an employee of the U.S. Postal Service. The crimes are alleged to have occurred from November 2011 to July 2012 in Johnson County, Kan.

If convicted, she faces a maximum penalty of 10 years and a fine up to $250,000. The U.S. Postal Service investigated. Assistant U.S. Attorney Jabari Wamble is prosecuting.

Jane Doe, also known as Lina Lanham, is charged with one count of document fraud, four counts of aggravated identity theft, one count of making a false statement on a passport application, one count of misusing a U.S. passport and one count of unlawful production of an identification document. The crimes are alleged to have occurred in 2007, 2009 and 2012 in Sedgwick County, Kan.

Upon conviction, the crimes carry the following penalties:
Document fraud: A maximum penalty of 10 years in federal prison without parole and a fine up to $250,000.
Aggravated identity theft: A mandatory two years to run consecutively to other sentences on each count.
Making a false statement on a passport application: A maximum penalty of 10 years without parole and a fine up to $250,000.
Misusing a passport: A maximum penalty of 10 years without parole and a fine up to $250,000.
Unlawful production of an identification document: A maximum penalty of 10 years without parole and a fine up to $250,000.

The U.S. Department of State, Diplomatic Security Service, investigated. Assistant U.S. Attorney Brent Anderson is prosecuting.

Ramon Miranda-Cota, 40, a citizen of Mexico who has been living in Wichita, is charged with unlawfully re-entering the United States after being deported. He was found July 19, 2012, in Sedgwick County, Kan.

If convicted, he faces a maximum penalty of two years in federal prison without parole and a fine up to $250,000. The Department of Homeland Security and Immigration and Customs Enforcement investigated. Assistant U.S. Attorney Brent Anderson is prosecuting.

Octavio Alvarez-Portela, 23, a citizen of Mexico who has been living in Great Bend, Kan., is charged with unlawfully re-entering the United States after being deported. He was found July 31, 2012, in Sedgwick County, Kan.

If convicted, he faces a maximum penalty of two years in federal prison without parole and a fine up to $250,000. Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s Enforcement and Removal Operations investigated. Assistant U.S. Attorney Brent Anderson is prosecuting.

In all cases, defendants are presumed innocent until and unless proven guilty. The indictments merely contain allegations of criminal conduct.

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