News

Bel Air Heroin Dealer Sentenced To 12 Years In Prison

Planned to Distribute Heroin in Harford County

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
August 8 , 2014


Baltimore, Maryland – U.S. District Judge Ellen L. Hollander sentenced Darryl Malloy, age 32, of Bel Air, Maryland today to 12 years in prison, followed by four years of supervised release, for possession with intent to distribute 100 grams or more of heroin. Judge Hollander ordered that Malloy’s federal sentence is to be concurrent to the 20 year sentence, all but eight years suspended, that he is currently serving on unrelated state charges.

The sentence was announced by United States Attorney for the District of Maryland Rod J. Rosenstein; Assistant Special Agent in Charge Gary Tuggle of the Drug Enforcement Administration, Baltimore District Office; and the members of the Harford County Narcotics Task Force: Harford County Sheriff L. Jesse Bane, Colonel Marcus L. Brown, Superintendent of the Maryland State Police, Chief Henry Trabert of the Aberdeen Police Department, Bel Air Police Chief Leo Matrangola, Chief Teresa Walter of the Havre de Grace Police Department, and Harford County State’s Attorney Joseph I. Cassilly.

According to Malloy’s plea agreement, on November 15, 2013, Malloy purchased more than 100 grams of heroin in Towson, Maryland, and transported it to a motel in Edgewood, Maryland, where Malloy was staying. Malloy admitted that he intended to divide the heroin into smaller quantities and package it for distribution.

United States Attorney Rod J. Rosenstein praised the DEA and Harford County Narcotics Task Force for their work in the investigation and thanked Assistant U.S. Attorneys Leo J. Wise and Brooke Carey, who prosecuted the case.

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