News

Frederick Man Sentenced in Marriage Fraud Scheme


Married Nine Immigrant Women So They Could Become Lawful Permanent Residents

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
FEBRUARY 21, 2008

Baltimore, Maryland - U.S. District Judge Andre M. Davis sentenced James Adjei Kyem, age 52, of Frederick, Maryland today to a year and a day in prison, followed by two years of supervised release for marriage fraud, perjury and passport fraud connected to a scheme in which Kyem married immigrants and later filed immigration applications so they could become lawful permanent residents, announced United States Attorney for the District of Maryland Rod J. Rosenstein. Judge Davis also ordered Kyem to perform 200 hours of community service.

According to his guilty plea, Kyem is a naturalized U.S. citizen, having obtained his citizenship through his marriage in 1984 to a female described by the initials “TAO” who was a naturalized U.S. citizen in New York City. From 1996 through April 2007, Kyem lived, or claimed in official government documents, to live at more than 21 different addresses in Maryland, New York, Massachusetts, New Jersey, and Virginia. During that time, Kyem married nine different immigrant women in those states, the first one while he was still married to “TAO”, whom he divorced in 1997. In each case, shortly after the marriage Kyem would file forms to change the woman’s immigration status to lawful permanent resident, falsely stating his marital status and that he did not gain permanent resident status through marriage to a U.S. citizen. Kyem entered into sham marriages with the immigrant women so that they could become lawful permanent residents. Kyem also filed an alien “fiancee” petition for another woman in December 2006.

For example, on July 7, 2006, Kyem married “DOA” in Frederick County, Maryland, and the next month filed forms seeking to change DOA’s legal status to lawful permanent resident, making false statements under oath and under the penalty of perjury regarding his address and names of prior wives. On October 13, 2006, Kyem perjured himself during an interview with United States immigration authorities regarding his addresses and prior marriages. In May 2007, Kyem committed passport fraud by using his passport, which was obtained based on an application filed in March 2002 that contained false statements regarding Kyem’s marital status, to assist DOA in the immigration process. Judge Davis found that Kyem received payment from “DOA” as well as some of the other women for the sham marriages and enhanced Kyem's sentence based on this aggravating role in the offense.

United States Attorney Rod J. Rosenstein praised U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services’ Office of Fraud Detection and National Security, U.S. Postal Inspection Service and the Department of State, Bureau of Diplomatic Security for their investigative work. Mr. Rosenstein thanked Assistant U.S. Attorneys Sandra Wilkinson and Solette Magnelli, who are prosecuting the case.

 

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USAO Homepage
Maryland Exile
Project Safe Childhood

Help us combat the proliferation of sexual exploitation crimes against children.

Stop Fraud.gov

Protect yourself from fraud, and report suspected cases of financial fraud to local law enforcement.

Don't Lose Yourself in a Gang

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USAO Homepage
Maryland Exile
Project Safe Childhood

Help us combat the proliferation of sexual exploitation crimes against children.

Stop Fraud.gov

Protect yourself from fraud, and report suspected cases of financial fraud to local law enforcement.

Don't Lose Yourself in a Gang

Talk to your kids about gangs and how to avoid them.

Maryland Human Trafficking Task Force
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Return to Top

USAO Homepage
Maryland Exile
Project Safe Childhood

Help us combat the proliferation of sexual exploitation crimes against children.

Stop Fraud.gov

Protect yourself from fraud, and report suspected cases of financial fraud to local law enforcement.

Don't Lose Yourself in a Gang

Talk to your kids about gangs and how to avoid them.

Maryland Human Trafficking Task Force
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