News

Members of Stolen Treasury Check Ring Sentenced to Prison

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
October 23, 2009

Baltimore, Maryland - U.S. District Judge J. Frederick Motz sentenced Tandria Boyd, age 37, of Baltimore, today to 30 months in prison followed by three years of supervised release for conspiracy to commit mail fraud, forged endorsement on a treasury check and aggravated identity theft, in connection with a scheme to steal treasury checks from the mail and cash the checks using false identity documents, announced United States Attorney for the District of Maryland Rod J. Rosenstein.

U.S. District Judge Catherine C. Blake today sentenced co-defendant Chamarko Amin, age 38, of Temple Hills, Maryland, to four years in prison, followed by three years of supervised release, on charges of conspiracy to commit mail fraud and aggravated identity theft for his role the scheme. Yesterday, Judge Blake sentenced another co-defendant, Katasha Davis, age 38, of Baltimore, to two years and a day in prison, followed by three years of supervised release, for conspiracy to commit mail fraud, forged endorsement on a treasury check and aggravated identity theft.

According to the conspirators’ plea agreements and the testimony at Boyd’s four day trial, beginning in March, 2006 and continuing until May, 2007, Davis, Boyd and others, including Michael Hawkins, Jamal Snead and Theodore Terrell, cashed stolen Treasury checks at local check cashing establishments, posing as the intended recipient of the check and using fake Maryland driver’s licenses bearing their photograph and the names and addresses of the intended recipients of the stolen checks. Co-defendant David Cooley recruited individuals to cash the stolen checks and arranged to obtain the fake identification cards for those individuals. Cooley also introduced Snead to United States Postal Service employee Leonard Jenkins, who stole the checks from the mail. Davis and Boyd received the checks from Cooley or Snead, and received a percentage of the money they obtained by cashing them. Davis and Boyd gave the rest of the money to Cooley or Snead. Amin created the false Maryland driver’s licenses and he and co-defendant Derek Taylor distributed them to members of the conspiracy who cashed the stolen treasury checks.

Davis personally cashed at least three stolen Treasury checks, totaling more than $10,000, using false Maryland driver’s licenses bearing Davis’ photograph and the names and addresses of the individuals who were the intended recipients of the stolen Treasury checks. Altogether, the conspirators cashed over $100,000 in stolen United States Treasury checks.

Co-defendant Jamal Kareem Snead, age 32, of Baltimore, was sentenced to 75 months in prison for conspiracy to commit mail fraud, forged endorsement on a treasury check and aggravated identity theft. Theodore Terrell, age 30, of Washington, D.C., was sentenced to 45 months in prison, on the same charges. Both Snead and Terrell were ordered to pay restitution in the amount of $104,446.35. Cooley, age 36, of Baltimore pleaded guilty to conspiracy to commit mail fraud and aggravated identity theft and is scheduled to be sentenced on October 30, 2009, at 10:30 a.m. Leonard Jenkins, age 27, of Baltimore, pleaded guilty to mail fraud, theft of mail and aggravated identity theft and is scheduled to be sentenced on November 3, 2009 at 9:15 a.m.

Derrick Taylor, age 44, of Baltimore, was sentenced to 51 months in prison, for conspiracy to commit mail fraud and aggravated identity theft, and was also ordered to pay restitution of $104,446.35. Michael Hawkins, age 50, of Baltimore, was sentenced to four years in prison for his role in the scheme.

To date, twelve defendants, have been convicted for participating in this scheme and 10 of those, including Boyd, Amin and Davis, have been sentenced.

United States Attorney Rod J. Rosenstein thanked the U.S. Postal Inspection Service; the U.S. Postal Service, Office of Inspector General; the U.S. Secret Service; the Department of Transportation - Office of Inspector General; the U.S. Department of the Treasury, Office of Inspector General; and the District of Columbia Office of Inspector General for their investigative work and recognized the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Columbia for their assistance in this case. Mr. Rosenstein commended Assistant United States Attorneys Tamera L. Fine and Emily Glatfelter, who are prosecuting the case.

 

 

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