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Two Previously Convicted Sex Offenders Plead Guilty to Failing to Register as Sex Offenders in Maryland

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
April 21, 2011

Baltimore, Maryland - In unrelated cases, two previously convicted sex offenders pleaded guilty to failing to register as sex offenders in Maryland, although each man had acknowledged upon his release from prison that he was subject to registration as a sex offender in any state in which he resides, is employed, or is a student. Both had been convicted of sex offenses involving a minor victim.

The guilty pleas were announced by United States Attorney for the District of Maryland Rod J. Rosenstein; United States Marshal Johnny Hughes; Baltimore County Police Chief James W. Johnson; and Baltimore County State’s Attorney Scott Shellenberger.

Bruce Parker, age 59, pleaded guilty on April 19, 2011, to failing to register as a sex offender. According to his plea agreement, Parker was convicted in Ohio in 1991, of sex offenses involving a victim under 13 years of age. Despite signing a document in July 2008, acknowledging that he was subject to registration as a sex offender in any state in which he resides, is employed, or is a student, when Parker moved to St. Michaels, Maryland, in February 2009, he did not register as a sex offender in Maryland. Parker was arrested in St. Michaels, in February 2010, and admitted that he intentionally did not register as a sex offender in Maryland.

On April 20, 2011, Steven Leon Mack, age 30, also pleaded guilty to failing to register as a sex offender. Mack was initially convicted in 2002 in New York for second degree rape. Upon his release from prison, Mack moved to South Carolina where he registered as a sex offender until May 5, 2010. Mack moved to Maryland sometime after July 2010, and did not register as a sex offender in Maryland. On December 22, 2010, Baltimore County Police officers investigating complaints regarding an adult male harassing minors at a Dundalk elementary school identified Mack as the subject of the complaints. Mack admitted that he had failed to update his registration when he moved to Maryland.

Parker and Mack face a maximum penalty of 10 years in prison, a minimum of 5 years and up to lifetime supervised release. U.S. District Judge William M. Nickerson scheduled Parker’s sentencing for July 26, 2011 at 10:00 a.m. and U.S. District Judge William D. Quarles, Jr. scheduled Mack’s sentencing for July 12, 2011 at 9:00 a.m.

This case was brought as part of Project Safe Childhood, a nationwide initiative to combat the growing epidemic of child sexual exploitation and abuse launched in May 2006 by the Department of Justice. Led by United States Attorneys’ Offices and the Criminal Division's Child Exploitation and Obscenity Section (CEOS), Project Safe Childhood marshals federal, state and local resources to better locate, apprehend and prosecute individuals who exploit children via the internet, as well as to identify and rescue victims. For more information about Project Safe Childhood, please visit www.projectsafechildhood.gov. Details about Maryland’s program are available at www.justice.gov/usao/md/Safe-Childhood/index.html.

United States Attorney Rod J. Rosenstein commended the U.S. Marshals Service, for its work in the Parker and Mack cases, as well as the Baltimore County Police Department and the Baltimore County States’s Attorney’s Office for their work in the Mack investigation and prosecution. Mr. Rosenstein thanked Assistant U.S. Attorneys Justin S. Herring and Judson T. Mihok, who are prosecuting the Parker and Mack cases, respectively.

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