News and Press Releases

News and Press Releases

Area builder pleads guilty to Tax Evasion

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
May 14, 2012


MINNEAPOLIS—Earlier today in federal court in St. Paul, the owner of RMA Builders and Remodelers (“RMA”), a business that handled residential work in Minnesota and other states, pleaded guilty to federal tax evasion. Robert Michael Aasen specifically pleaded guilty to one count of tax evasion. Aasen, who was charged on April 12, 2012, entered his plea before United States District Court Judge Susan Richard Nelson.

In his plea agreement, Aasen admitted evading federal income taxes in 2005 by failing to file a tax return and taking specific steps to cover up the fact he had received certain income. Moreover, he admitted diverting corporate receipts for personal purposes and using multiple bank accounts in an effort to hide income. According to his plea today, Aasen also withheld information from his accountant and the Internal Revenue Service personnel investigating his case and failed to produce business records for inspection. He evaded paying approximately $265,863 in federal income taxes between 2005 and 2007 through his actions.

For his crime, Aasen faces a potential maximum penalty of five years in federal prison. Judge Nelson will determine his sentence at a future hearing. This case is the result of an investigation by the Internal Revenue Service-Criminal Investigation Division. It is being prosecuted by Assistant U.S. Attorney Robert M. Lewis.

Per U.S. Department of Justice policy, the U.S. Attorney’s Office is not allowed to provide the age and city of residence for defendants charged in criminal tax cases.

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