News and Press Releases

mexican national indicted for smuggling heroin in his shoes

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
January 28, 2014

KANSAS CITY, Mo. – Tammy Dickinson, United States Attorney for the Western District of Missouri, announced that a Mexican national was indicted by a federal grand jury today for attempting to transport approximately two pounds of heroin across the country in his shoes.

Sergio Arturo Gonzalez-Garcia, 29, a citizen of Mexico, was charged with possessing heroin with the intent to distribute in an indictment returned by a federal grand jury in Kansas City, Mo. Today’s indictment replaces a federal criminal complaint that was filed against Gonzalez-Garcia on Jan. 21, 2014. Gonzalez-Garcia remains in federal custody.

According to an affidavit filed in support of the original criminal complaint, law enforcement officers saw Gonzalez-Garcia waiting to claim his luggage after he arrived at the Greyhound bus terminal at 1101 S. Troost Ave., Kansas City, on Jan. 20, 2014. A drug detection dog started pulling its handler in the direction where Gonzalez-Garcia was standing, the affidavit says, and when he saw the officer approaching, Gonzalez-Garcia immediately walked into the bus terminal.

When Gonzalez-Garcia later walked back to the bus, then returned to the terminal, a Kansas City police detective noticed that he seemed to have difficulty walking, the affidavit says. The detective also noticed that the athletic shoes Gonzalez-Garcia was wearing did not bend as he took steps.

The detective followed Gonzalez-Garcia into the terminal and questioned him. The detective asked Gonzalez-Garcia if he could search his shoes. They went into the customer service office and Gonzalez-Garcia removed his shoes. Officers found a bundle of heroin inside each of the shoes, which weighed a total of 993 grams (more than two pounds).

Gonzalez-Garcia, who told police he was transporting the heroin from Los Angeles, Calif., to St. Louis, Mo., was arrested.

Dickinson cautioned that the charge contained in this indictment is simply an accusation, and not evidence of guilt. Evidence supporting the charge must be presented to a federal trial jury, whose duty is to determine guilt or innocence.

This case is being prosecuted by Assistant U.S. Attorney David A. Barnes. It was investigated by the Kansas City, Mo., Police Department and the Drug Enforcement Administration.

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