News and Press Releases

Florida Man Sentenced to 24 Years in Prison for Conspiring to Kill Federal Judge

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
August 01, 2013

Defendant Paid $22,000 to Undercover Police Officer as Down Payment for Murders of Federal Judge and Federal Prosecutor

BROOKLYN, N.Y.-- U.S. Attorney William J. Hochul, Jr. announced today that Dejvid Mirkovic, 38, of Lake Worth, Florida, was sentenced by U.S. District Judge John Keenan to 24 years in prison for conspiring to murder the U.S. District Judge (the “federal judge”) who presided over the boiler room fraud conviction of Mirkovic’s coconspirator, a close business associate. Mirkovic and his coconspirator agreed to pay $40,000 to an undercover police officer, who they thought was a hit-man, to kill the federal judge as well as the Assistant U.S. Attorney (the “federal prosecutor”) who successfully handled the coconspirator’s fraud prosecution. Mirkovic paid the undercover officer $22,000 in cash as a down payment for the murders of the federal judge and the federal prosecutor.

In addition to the term of imprisonment, Judge Keenan sentenced Mirkovic to five years of supervised release and the forfeiture of over $200,000, a car and four firearms.

According to case filings and statements at Mirkovic’s guilty plea proceeding, law enforcement authorities learned of the plot in August 2012, when a confidential informant reported that Mirkovic’s coconspirator stated he wanted to torture and kill the federal judge and the federal prosecutor and asked the informant for assistance in arranging for a hit-man to carry out the murders. During the subsequent investigation, two undercover law enforcement officers, posing as hit-men, met with Mirkovic and the coconspirator numerous times at locations on Long Island, including at the Nassau County Correctional Center (“NCCC”), where the coconspirator was being held. At one of the first meetings, the coconspirator offered to pay one of the undercover officers $3,000 to assault an individual with whom the coconspirator had a financial dispute. Mirkovic then met with one of the undercover officers and paid him $1,500 as a down payment for the assault. After one of the undercover officers showed proof of the purported assault of John Doe – in fact, a staged photograph and an identification card for John Doe – Mirkovic paid the undercover officer the $1,500 balance.

Later that same day, Mirkovic again met with the undercover officer, relayed the coconspirator’s instructions to murder the federal judge and federal prosecutor, and offered $40,000 for commission of the two murders. Mirkovic also gave the undercover officer a $12,000 down payment and paid an additional $10,000 the following week. Mirkovic promised payment of the final $18,000 upon confirmation of the murders. At the time of Mirkovic’s arrest at his home in Lake Worth, Florida, law enforcement officers recovered $18,000 in cash and a loaded 9mm semi-automatic handgun.

In pleading guilty on March 13, 2013, Mirkovic admitted under oath that he agreed to kill the federal judge in retaliation for the performance of the judge’s duties. Mirkovic further admitted under oath that he traveled to the Eastern District of New York in the fall of 2012 and made a down payment for the murder.

The sentence was the latest development in an investigation handled by Special Agents of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, New York Office, under the direction of Assistant Director-in-Charge George Venizelos. The government’s case is being prosecuted by Assistant United States Attorneys Marshall L. Miller, Una A. Dean, and Brian Morris of the Eastern District of New York, under the supervision of U.S. Attorney William J. Hochul of the Western District of New York.

 


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