D O J Seal
U.S. Department of Justice


United States Attorney James T. Jacks
Northern District of Texas

 

 

 
 

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
MEDIA INQUIRIES: KATHY COLVIN

FRIDAY, JANUARY 29, 2010
http://www.usdoj.gov/usao/txn/

 

 

PHONE: (214)659-8600

 

 

ARLINGTON, TEXAS, MAN AND HIS ACCOMPLICE
SENTENCED IN BANK FRAUD SCHEME


FORT WORTH,
Texas — Isaac McCrumby, 29, of Arlington, Texas, was sentenced today by U.S. District Judge John H. McBryde to 160 months (more than 13 years) in federal prison on a bank fraud conviction, announced U.S. Attorney James T. Jacks of the Northern District of Texas. In addition, Judge McBryde ordered that McCrumby pay approximately $125,000 in restitution.

According to documents filed in court with the plea, McCrumby admitted that from January 1, 2008, to May 1, 2009, he and co-defendant Kimberly Crawford conspired together to defraud Countrywide Bank. Crawford, 27, also of Arlington, worked at Countrywide as a customer service representative and had access to customers’ bank account numbers. She pleaded guilty to her role in the scheme in June 2009, and is currently serving a 40-month federal prison sentence. She was also ordered to pay more than $8000 in restitution.

As part of her job, Crawford answered telephone calls from customers who had questions about their accounts. When customers provided their account numbers, she would write them down, and when she had gathered 30 to 40 account numbers, she would call McCrumby and the two would arrange a meeting. Crawford would typically meet McCrumby at his office/music studio, where she would sell him the list of account numbers. McCrumby also bought stolen account numbers from individuals other than Crawford.

McCrumby used the stolen account numbers to create and pass counterfeit checks. He printed the checks at his office, and personally passed approximately 500 counterfeit checks, averaging approximately $600 in proceeds from each counterfeit check that he personally passed. McCrumby also employed “runners” to pass the counterfeit checks and split the proceeds with his runners. McCrumby and his runners used the counterfeit checks they created at a variety of retail stores.

The case was investigated by the U.S. Secret Service and the Euless Police Department. Assistant U.S. Attorney Jay Weimer was in charge of the prosecution.

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