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BANK ROBBER WHO USED TAXI CAB AS GET-AWAY VEHICLE, SENTENCED TO 109 MONTHS IN FEDERAL PRISON

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
September 9, 2011

DALLAS — Convicted taxi-riding bank robber, Joseph Lamon Williams, 36, of Houston, Texas, was sentenced today by Chief U.S. District Judge Sidney A. Fitzwater to 109 months (nine years and one month) in federal prison for robbing a Wells Fargo Bank in Dallas, announced U.S. Attorney James T. Jacks of the Northern District of Texas.

According to documents filed in the case, on November 16, 2010, Williams entered the Wells Fargo Bank, located at 13050 Coit Road in Dallas, and waited in line before he approached a teller counter. He presented a note to the teller that read,

“IF I HEAR THE CODE FOR BANK ROBBERY YOU DIE. YOU HAVE 05 SECONDS TO PRODUCE $ NO 1 OR 5. Top + 2nd TILLS. NO ALARMS. NO DYE PACK. NO TRACERS. IF ANYTHING GOES WRONG OR IF IM FOLLOWED I WILL COME BACK IN + RANDOMLY SHOOT CUSTOMERS.”

Williams then raised his shirt, pointed to what appeared to be two black handguns, and stated, “You see these? I want it now. I specifically told you in my note I don’t want any ones or fives, put them back.” The teller complied; Williams took the money and raised his shirt again, pointed at what appeared to be two black handguns, and said, “Make sure you remember this.”

Williams left the bank in a taxi cab which took him to a nearby apartment complex, where he transferred into another cab. The cab took Williams back to an area near the bank where he got out. Shortly thereafter, a responding officer with the Dallas Police Department arrived and Williams ran toward the officer with what appeared to be a handgun in one hand. The officer ordered him to drop his weapon, however Williams refused to drop the weapon and continued advancing, causing the officer to fire his weapon at Williams, striking him in the leg and grazing his head. After Williams’ arrest, law enforcement examined the weapons and determined they were actually 4.5 millimeter caliber pellet guns that are very similar in appearance to, and closely resemble, real hand guns.

The case was investigated by the FBI and the Dallas Police Department. Assistant U.S. Attorney John Kull was in charge of the prosecution.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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