Deparmtent of Justice Logo and United States Attorney's Office Header
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
ANGELA DODGE

Jan. 12, 2011

PUBLIC AFFAIRS OFFICER
(713) 567-9388

MICHIGAN MAN CONVICTED FOR FAILING TO REGISTER AS A SEX OFFENDER AFTER MOVING TO TEXAS

(HOUSTON) - Robert Earl Johnson, 44, a convicted sex offender, pleaded guilty today to failing to register as a sex offender upon moving to Texas, United States Attorney José Angel Moreno announced today.

Johnson appeared before United States District Judge Keith Ellison today and entered his plea of guilty to the federal felony offense enacted as part of the Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act in July 2006. Johnson was indicted in October 2010. Sentencing is scheduled for March 31, 2011.

The investigation leading to the charges against Johnson was conducted by the United States Marshals Service (USMS) as part of Operation Guardian.

In July 2006, Congress established the Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act to protect the public from sex offenders and offenders against children and in response to the vicious attacks by violent predators. This charge is brought under the Sex Offender Registration and Notification Act (SORNA) a sub-chapter of the Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act. Under SORNA persons previously convicted of certain sexual offenses shall register and keep current, in each jurisdiction where the offender resides, where the offender is an employee and where the offender is a student. For initial registration purposes only, a sex offender shall also register in the jurisdiction in which convicted if such jurisdiction is different from the jurisdiction of residence.

Johnson was convicted of first degree criminal sexual conduct in the state of Michigan in 1995 and ordered to register as a sex offender. In May 2008, Johnson moved to Houston failed to register as a sex offender as required. USMS Deputies found Johnson in September 2010 working at Luby’s after an investigation revealed that he had left their jurisdiction without notification.    

At sentencing, Johnson faces up to 10 years in federal prison and a $250,000 fine. Any prison sentence will be followed by no less than five years and potentially up to a life term of supervised release during which the court can impose any number of conditions to protect children.

This case is being prosecuted by AUSA Sherri L. Zack.

# # #