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Fourth Defendant In Fake Id Ring Pleads Guilty

Michael DelRio Admits to Conspiring to Commit Identification Document Fraud

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

March 5, 2014

CHARLOTTESVILLE, VIRGINIA – A New Jersey man, and the fourth member of a Charlottesville-based fake identification ring, pled guilty this morning in the United States District Court for the Western District of Virginia in Charlottesville.

Michael A. DelRio, a.k.a. “Copernicus Lionheart” age 19, of Edison, New Jersey, pled guilty today in U.S. District Court to one count of conspiracy to commit identification document fraud. Previously, Alan McNeil Jones, Kelly Erin McPhee and Mark Gil Bernardo all pled guilty to one count of conspiracy to commit identification fraud and one count of aggravated identity theft for their roles in the conspiracy.

“Mr. DelRio played a significant role in perpetuating a high-tech and sophisticated scheme to produce and sell high-quality false identification documents all across the nation,” United States Attorney Timothy J. Heaphy said today. “He worked to develop a web-based interface for potential customers that, if deployed, would have made the criminal enterprise even more lucrative than it was. Because false identification documents present very real threat to our security, we will continue to prioritize cases like that against Mr. DelRio and his co-conspirators.”

"Counterfeit identity documents, like the ones produced by this ring, can be used by criminals, enabling them to mask their identities and operate with ease in the United States," said Scot Rittenberg, acting special agent in charge of ICE Homeland Security Investigations, Washington. "HSI is committed to stopping this threat that undermines our nation's security."

Previously, Jones, McPhee and Bernardo admitted to conspiring to create high-quality, fraudulent driver’s licenses out of the home they shared on Rugby Road in Charlottesville. The conspiracy, which began in 2010 and operated under the name Novel Design, produced and sold more than 25,000 fraudulent driver’s licenses, primarily to college students, throughout the nation.

As part of the scheme, Jones paid commissions to students at the University of Virginia, and elsewhere, to refer his service to other students interested in obtaining fraudulent driver’s licenses. He also outsourced some of the manufacturing work to companies in Bangladesh and China.

Jones and Bernardo recruited DelRio to streamline the website for their fraudulent identification business. Jones paid DelRio $15,000 to build a website that would allow customers to input biographical information directly onto the site, which would then be printed on the fraudulent identification document each customer had ordered. Allowing customers to enter information via a secure, off-shore website would have saved the conspirators the time it previously took to input that information by hand. Both Jones and Bernardo indicated that DelRio had been informed of the nature and use of the program he was being asked to produce.

At sentencing, DelRio faces a maximum possible penalty of up to 15 years in prison and/or a fine of up to $250,000.

The investigation of the case was conducted by U.S. Immigration and Custom Enforcement’s (ICE) Homeland Security Investigations (HIS) Washington, the United States Postal Inspection Service, the Virginia State Police and the Virginia Attorney General’s Computer Forensics Unit. United States Attorney Timothy J. Heaphy, Assistant United States Attorney Ronald Huber and third-year University of Virginia Law Student Maggie Sullivan prosecuted the case for the United States.

 

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