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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                                                                                                                                          Aug. 27, 2012                   

TWO MEN SENTENCED TO FEDERAL PRISON FOR CRACK COCAINE CONSPIRACY

Defendants both listed among Charleston’s West Side DMI offenders

CHARLESTON, W.Va. – U.S. Attorney Booth Goodwin today announced that two men were sentenced to federal prison on drug conspiracy charges.  Michael Robbins, 62, also known as “Michael Robertson,” of Charleston, was sentenced to two years and three months in prison and three years of supervised release.  Robbins previously pleaded guilty in April to maintaining a residence for the purpose of distributing crack cocaine.  Co-conspirator Jueron Smith-Bey, 29, also known as “Cash” and “Cash Money,” of Detroit, was sentenced to eight months in prison and four months of home confinement electronic monitoring as part of a three-year supervised release term.  Smith-Bey previously pleaded guilty in April to conspiracy to distribute crack cocaine and distribution of crack cocaine.

Smith-Bey admitted that beginning about July 2011 through in or about October 2011, he was involved in a conspiracy to sell crack cocaine from a Delaware Avenue residence owned by defendant Michael Robbins.  Smith-Bey further admitted that he brought amounts of crack cocaine to the Charleston residence where the crack was then sold by another conspirator, Darlene Smith. 

On July 26, 2011, members of the Metropolitan Drug Network Team (MDENT) conducted a knock and talk at 127 Delaware Avenue.  After obtaining permission to search the residence, officers found approximately one gram of crack cocaine, nine individual bags of crack cocaine weighing .5 grams and a loaded Ruger P95 9-millimeter pistol.  Defendants Robbins and Ms. Smith were at the residence at the time the knock and talk was conducted by law enforcement.

Smith-Bey admitted that on September 29, 2011, and during the course of the conspiracy, he sold crack cocaine to a confidential informant working at the direction of the Charleston Police Department (CPD) Special Enforcement Unit. Smith-Bey also admitted that following the September 29 drug transaction, he and the confidential informant entered the Delaware residence owned by defendant Robbins and he introduced the confidential source to Robbins as “the man of the house.”  Additionally, Smith-Bey also introduced the informant to Ms. Smith as the person who “he needs to come see when he’s gone.”  

Smith-Bey further admitted that on October 19, 2011, he sold heroin to an informant working with the CPD Special Enforcement Unit.   

In July, Darlene D. Smith, 42, of Charleston, was sentenced to 2 ½ years in federal prison for distributing crack cocaine.  Smith previously pleaded guilty in March.  She admitted that from July 2011 through October 2011, she participated in a conspiracy to distribute crack cocaine.

Both matters were prosecuted as part of the Charleston area’s Drug Market Intervention (DMI) initiative. The DMI initiative was launched in February 2012 by Charleston Police Chief Brent Webster and U.S. Attorney Booth Goodwin, in collaboration with Kanawha County Prosecuting Attorney Mark Plants, other federal, state, local law enforcement agencies and leaders representing several West Side community development organizations. The DMI initiative was initiated in Charleston as a strategic problem-solving effort aimed at closing down open-air drug markets that breed crimes of violence and disorder.

The Charleston Police Department and the Metropolitan Drug Network Team (MDENT) conducted the investigations.  U.S. Attorney Booth Goodwin handled the prosecutions.  The sentences were imposed by United States District Judge Thomas E. Johnston.

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