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National Drug Intelligence Center
Methamphetamine Drug Threat Assessment
March 2005
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Figure 1. Six Regions and Primary Market Areas for methamphetamine.

Map of the U.S. showing the six regions and Primary Market Areas for methamphetamine.

The Pacific region consists of Alaska, Hawaii, Northern and Central California, Oregon, Washington, Idaho, Nevada, and the territories of Guam, American Samoa, and the Northern Mariana Islands
The West region consists of Montana, Wyoming, Utah, Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, South Dakota, and North Dakota.
The Southwest region consists of Southern California, Arizona, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas.
The Midwest region consists of Minnesota, Iowa, Missouri, Wisconsin, Illinois, Michigan, Indiana, and Ohio.
The Northeast region consists of Virginia, West Virginia, Maryland, Delaware, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York, Connecticut, Rhode Island, Massachusetts, Vermont, New Hampshire, and Maine.
The Southeast region consists of Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Florida, Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, Tennessee, Kentucky, and the territories of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

San Francisco, Los Angeles, San Diego, and Phoenix are leading consumption areas and leading distribution centers for the drug as determined through analysis of public health data and law enforcement reporting.

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Figure 2. Methamphetamine-related arrests, United States, 2000-2003.

Chart showing a declining number of methamphetamine-related arrests in the U.S. for the years 2000-2003.

The chart shows that there were 7,700 methamphetamine-related arrests in 2000, 6,557 in 2001, 5,558 in 2002, and 4,595 in 2003.

Source: Drug Enforcement Administration.

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Figure 3. Methamphetamine-related arrests, by region, 2003.

Bar graph showing the number of methamphetamine-related arrests in 2003, broken down by region.

There were 1,271 methamphetamine-related arrests in the Midwest region, 198 in the Northeast region, 634 in the Pacific region, 811 in the Southeast region, 1,232 in the Southwest region, and 349 in the West region.

Source: Drug Enforcement Administration.

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Figure 4. Adult trends in percentage of past year use of methamphetamine, 1999-2003.

Chart showing the fluctuating adult trends in percentage of past year use of methamphetamine for the years 1999-2003.

In 1999, 3.3 percent of college students (ages 19-22) and 2.8 percent of adults (ages 19-28) reported past year use of methamphetamine.
In 2000, 1.6 percent of college students (ages 19-22) and 2.5 percent of adults (ages 19-28) reported past year use of methamphetamine.
In 2001, 2.4 percent of college students (ages 19-22) and 2.8 percent of adults (ages 19-28) reported past year use of methamphetamine.
In 2002, 1.2 percent of college students (ages 19-22) and 2.5 percent of adults (ages 19-28) reported past year use of methamphetamine.
In 2003, 2.6 percent of college students (ages 19-22) and 2.7 percent of adults (ages 19-28) reported past year use of methamphetamine.

Source: Monitoring the Future.

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Figure 5. Adolescent trends in percentage of past year use of methamphetamine, 1999-2004.

Chart showing the declining adolescent trends in percentage of past year use of methamphetamine for the years 1999-2004.

In 1999, 3.2 percent of eighth graders, 4.6 percent of tenth graders, and 4.7 percent of twelfth graders reported past year use of methamphetamine.
In 2000, 2.5 percent of eighth graders, 4.0 percent of tenth graders, and 4.3 percent of twelfth graders reported past year use of methamphetamine.
In 2001, 2.8 percent of eighth graders, 3.7 percent of tenth graders, and 3.9 percent of twelfth graders reported past year use of methamphetamine.
In 2002, 2.2 percent of eighth graders, 3.9 percent of tenth graders, and 3.6 percent of twelfth graders reported past year use of methamphetamine.
In 2003, 2.5 percent of eighth graders, 3.3 percent of tenth graders, and 3.2 percent of twelfth graders reported past year use of methamphetamine.
In 2004, 1.5 percent of eighth graders, 3.0 percent of tenth graders, and 3.4 percent of twelfth graders reported past year use of methamphetamine.

Source: Monitoring the Future.

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Figure 6. Trends in perceived harmfulness of methamphetamine, teens, 1996-2003.

Two charts for the years 1996-2003: one showing percentage of teens saying there is "great risk" in people trying methamphetamine once or twice, and one showing percentage of teens saying there is "great risk" in taking methamphetamine regularly.

In 1996, 41 percent of teens perceived "great risk" in trying methamphetamine once or twice; 77 percent perceived "great risk" in taking methamphetamine regularly.
In 1997, 44 percent of teens perceived "great risk" in trying methamphetamine once or twice; 79 percent perceived "great risk" in taking methamphetamine regularly.
In 1998, 44 percent of teens perceived "great risk" in trying methamphetamine once or twice; 78 percent perceived "great risk" in taking methamphetamine regularly.
In 1999, 44 percent of teens perceived "great risk" in trying methamphetamine once or twice; 78 percent perceived "great risk" in taking methamphetamine regularly.
In 2000, 47 percent of teens perceived "great risk" in trying methamphetamine once or twice; 78 percent perceived "great risk" in taking methamphetamine regularly.
In 2001, 47 percent of teens perceived "great risk" in trying methamphetamine once or twice; 78 percent perceived "great risk" in taking methamphetamine regularly.
In 2002, 49 percent of teens perceived "great risk" in trying methamphetamine once or twice; 79 percent perceived "great risk" in taking methamphetamine regularly.
In 2003, 51 percent of teens perceived "great risk" in trying methamphetamine once or twice; 79 percent perceived "great risk" in taking methamphetamine regularly.

Source: Partnership Attitude Tracking Study.

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Figure 7. Trends in perceived harmfulness of ice methamphetamine, selected groups, 1992-2003.

Graph showing percentage of people in selected age groups in the years 1992-2003 saying there is "great risk" in people trying methamphetamine once or twice.

The percentage of twelfth graders saying there is "great risk" in people trying methamphetamine once or twice was 61.9 in 1992, 57.5 in 1993, 58.3 in 1994, 54.4 in 1995, 55.3 in 1996, 54.4 in 1997, 52.7 in 1998, 51.2 in 1999, 51.3 in 2000, 52.7 in 2001, 53.8 in 2002, and 51.2 in 2003.

The percentage of college students (ages 19-22) saying there is "great risk" in people trying methamphetamine once or twice was 57.7 in 1992, 57.5 in 1993, 61.4 in 1994, 58.9 in 1995, 61.1 in 1996, 56.4 in 1997, 55.8 in 1998, 50.6 in 1999, 49.2 in 2000, 52.5 in 2001, 56.5 in 2002, and 60.0 in 2003.

The percentage of adults (ages 27-30) saying there is "great risk" in people trying methamphetamine once or twice was 52.7 in 1992, 60.3 in 1993, 57.9 in 1994, 58.5 in 1995, 59.1 in 1996, 59.8 in 1997, 59.9 in 1998, 61.0 in 1999, 59.7 in 2000, 66.4 in 2001, 62.5 in 2002, and 66.6 in 2003.

Source: Partnership Attitude Tracking Study.

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Figure 8. Methamphetamine-related emergency department mentions, estimated number, 1995-2002.

Chart showing the estimated number of methamphetamine-related emergency department mentions for the years 1995-2002.

In 1995, there were an estimated 15,933 methamphetamine-related emergency department mentions.
In 1996, there were an estimated 11,022 methamphetamine-related emergency department mentions.
In 1997, there were an estimated 17,154 methamphetamine-related emergency department mentions.
In 1998, there were an estimated 11,486 methamphetamine-related emergency department mentions.
In 1999, there were an estimated 10,447 methamphetamine-related emergency department mentions.
In 2000, there were an estimated 13,505 methamphetamine-related emergency department mentions.
In 2001, there were an estimated 14,925 methamphetamine-related emergency department mentions.
In 2002, there were an estimated 17,696 methamphetamine-related emergency department mentions.

Source: Drug Abuse Warning Network.

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Figure 9. Methamphetamine-related admissions to publicly funded treatment facilities, number, 1995-2002.

Chart showing the number of methamphetamine-related admissions to publicly funded treatment facilities for the years 1995-2002.

In 1995, there were 47,683 methamphetamine-related admissions to publicly funded treatment facilities.
In 1996, there were 41,035 methamphetamine-related admissions to publicly funded treatment facilities.
In 1997, there were 53,694 methamphetamine-related admissions to publicly funded treatment facilities.
In 1998, there were 56,517 methamphetamine-related admissions to publicly funded treatment facilities.
In 1999, there were 58,795 methamphetamine-related admissions to publicly funded treatment facilities.
In 2000, there were 66,975 methamphetamine-related admissions to publicly funded treatment facilities.
In 2001, there were 81,799 methamphetamine-related admissions to publicly funded treatment facilities.
In 2002, there were 104,481 methamphetamine-related admissions to publicly funded treatment facilities.

Source: Treatment Episode Data Set.

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Figure 10. Methamphetamine laboratory seizures, number reported, 1999-2003.

Chart showing the number of reported methamphetamine laboratory seizures for the years 1999-2003.

In 1999, there were 6,777 reported methamphetamine laboratory seizures.
In 2000, there were 6,940 reported methamphetamine laboratory seizures.
In 2001, there were 8,577 reported methamphetamine laboratory seizures.
In 2002, there were 9,192 reported methamphetamine laboratory seizures.
In 2003, there were 10,182 reported methamphetamine laboratory seizures.

Source: National Clandestine Laboratory Seizure System.

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Figure 11. Methamphetamine seizures at or between ports of entry, in kilograms, 2003.

Chart showing methamphetamine seizures in kilograms at or between ports of entry in 2003, broken down by state.

In Arizona, 640 kilograms of methamphetamine were seized.
In California, 593 kilograms of methamphetamine were seized.
In Texas, 484 kilograms of methamphetamine were seized.
In New Mexico, 16 kilograms of methamphetamine were seized.

Source: El Paso Intelligence Center.

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