New Faces in the Division 2017

Division Update Spring 2017

David Chu

David Chu

David Chu

David is an attorney in the New York Office.

How did you become interested in antitrust law?

My undergraduate degree is in economics, so I was naturally drawn towards antitrust classes at law school. After law school, I joined a firm with a robust antitrust practice, and I spent most of my time on cartel cases (including an investigation where the DOJ lead was Acting Assistant Attorney General Brent Snyder). Antitrust was simply a great intersection of economics and white collar work.

What do you like best about working at the Division?

I’m really impressed with the level of cooperation between the various constituencies in the Division. As trial attorneys, we work closely with our case team, our section management, the Front Office, the Appellate Section, the Foreign Commerce Section, the Information Systems Support Group, and the Economic Analysis Group (as well as others) to put together the best possible case. Each case really feels like a Division-wide endeavor.

Do you have a favorite antitrust case or personality?

My favorite case is Matsushita—it is a classic for both antitrust and civil procedure. My favorite antitrust personalities are judges Posner and Easterbrook.

Rachel Flipse

Rachel Flipse

Rachel Flipse

Rachel is an attorney in the Transportation, Energy, and Agriculture Section.

How did you become interested in antitrust law?

I fell into it. During my first year in private practice, with no academic exposure to antitrust, I was lucky enough to start working on an international cartel matter. I was drawn to the combination of complex factual issues and difficult, often novel, questions of law.

What do you like best about working at the Division?

I like that I have the opportunity to work in a collegial environment, with dedicated and brilliant colleagues, on challenging and complex cases. Every day is different, and we are always looking to serve the public interest.

Why did you decide to join the Division?

I had already decided that I wanted to transition to public service, and my background and continued interest in antitrust law made it a perfect fit for me, so I jumped at the opportunity.

Danielle Garten

Danielle Garten

Danielle Garten

Danielle is an attorney in the Washington Criminal I Section.

How did you become interested in antitrust law?

My initial interest in antitrust law stemmed from the fact that there is a criminal component to the practice. While in private practice, I had the opportunity to learn from some fantastic antitrust lawyers that allowed me the opportunity to explore various aspects of the practice and really specialize in those areas I truly enjoyed. I have always found the intersection of law, economics, and business to be interesting, and the cases I have worked on over the years have been immensely challenging and truly rewarding.

What do you like best about working at the Division?

The people I have met so far have been amazing. The caliber of lawyers here is beyond measure, and everyone has been so welcoming and warm. Having colleagues that are both incredibly talented and tremendous people makes me look forward to coming to work each day.

Do you have a favorite antitrust case or personality?

I was incredibly lucky to learn from some of the best antitrust practitioners out there. I was introduced to criminal antitrust through work with Bill Baer and James W. Cooper—two outstanding mentors and lawyers—and my merger experience came through working on cases with Debbie Feinstein and Rich Rosen, both of whom are phenomenal practitioners and patient, hands-on teachers. I consider them to be my antitrust “heroes.”

Cerin Lindgrensavage

Cerin Lindgrensavage

Cerin Lindgrensavage

Cerin is an attorney in the Litigation I Section.

How did you become interested in antitrust law?

In law school, a friend recommended a class called Antitrust and Regulatory Alternatives taught by the incredibly engaging Professor Harry First. That class did a wonderful job of connecting practical considerations of how and why industries and markets work with the law—and I was hooked!

What do you like best about working at the Division?

I have really enjoyed the people I have gotten a chance to work with at the Division. I have been learning so much from the lawyers and the economists and am incredibly grateful for the time that so many people take to help each other and invest in the development of their colleagues.

Do you have a favorite antitrust case or personality?

My favorite antitrust case is the Aetna/Humana case that the Division just won! I am so grateful for the chance to be on the team.

Jessica Stahl

Jessica Stahl

Jessica Stahl

Jessica is an economist in the Economics Analysis Group.

How did you become interested in antitrust law?

In my economics Ph.D. program, I took a course on industrial organization on a whim, and instantly loved it. I like to think about how firms make strategic choices, how markets work and how consumers are ultimately impacted by market structure and firm decisions.

What do you like best about working at the Division?

I love to learn about the intricacies of different industries. Also I like that this is a place where there are hundreds of people, both economists and lawyers, who are interested in exactly the same issues and questions that I am interested in. Not only do I really enjoy the work I’m doing, but I also love to hear about the work that others are doing.

Why did you join the Division?

Previously I worked at the Federal Reserve Board. I had a fantastic experience there, and learned a lot about a wide range of topics: macroeconomic outlook, financial stability, bank mergers, and the payments industry. While there I started to think about some questions that had antitrust implications, and I realized that I really wanted to get more involved in antitrust.

Updated March 27, 2017