Agency Partners


The Consumer Protection Branch coordinates with multiple agencies, each of which provides consumer protection in a variety of areas.  The Branch works closely with agencies like the Food and Drug Administration, the Federal Trade Commission, the Consumer Product Safety Commission, the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the U. S. Postal Inspection Service, and the newly created Consumer Financial Protection Bureau.  These partnerships enable the Consumer Protection Branch to expand its enforcement efforts on behalf of the American consumer. 

Provided below are links leading to  agency partners and sources of consumer information that may be of further interest.

 

      CPB Image_Agency Partner Seal FDA Click to Visit Agency Partner

U.S. Food & Drug Administration (FDA)
Authorized by Congress to enforce the  Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act and several other public health laws, the FDA monitors the manufacture, import, transport, storage, and sale of $1 trillion worth of goods annually.
 

         CPB Image_Agency Partner Seal FTC Click to Visit Agency Partner     

Federal Trade Commission (FTC)
The FTC works for the consumer to prevent fraudulent, deceptive, and unfair business practices in the marketplace, and to provide  information to help consumers spot, stop, and avoid them.
 

         CPB Image_Agency Partner Seal CPSC Click to Visit Agency Partner

U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission(CPSC)
The CPSC is an independent Federal regulatory agency that increases public safety by reducing the risk of injury or  death from consumer products.
 

 CPB Image_Agency Partner Logo NHTSA Click to Visit Agency Partner

 

National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA)
NHTSA, a component  of the U.S. Department of Transportation, carries out safety programs under the National  Traffic and Motor Vehicle Safety Act of 1966 and the Highway Safety Act of 1966.
 

CPB Image_Agency Partner Logo Consumer Financial Protection Bureau

Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB)
The CFPB works to make markets for consumer financial products and services work for Americans — whether they are applying for a mortgage, choosing among credit cards, or using any number of other consumer financial products.
 

 
Updated August 3, 2016