Housing And Civil Enforcement Section

How to File a Complaint

If you believe that you have been the victim of illegal discrimination in housing.

Individuals who believe that they have been victims of an illegal housing practice may file a complaint with the Department of Housing and Urban Development [HUD] or file their own lawsuit in federal or state court. You must file the complaint with HUD within one year of the incident you believe to be housing discrimination. If you choose to file your own lawsuit in federal or state court, the Act requires that you do so within two years of the incident. If you have information that suggests a pattern or practice of discrimination in housing, please write to us.

If you believe that you have been the victim of illegal discrimination with regard to credit.

The Department of Justice may start a lawsuit where it has reason to believe that a creditor is engaged in a "pattern or practice" of discrimination. If you have information that suggests a pattern or practice of discrimination in credit, please write to us. Individuals who believe that they have been victims of an illegal housing practice, such as the denial of a mortgage, that involved credit may file a complaint with HUD. Individual complaints of discrimination are handled by the agencies who regulate the individual creditor.

If you believe that you have been the victim of illegal discrimination in public accommodations, such as a restaurant or hotel.

When there is reason to believe that a person or entity has engaged in a "pattern or practice" of discrimination of discrimination in public accommodations, the Department of Justice can bring a lawsuit. If you have information that suggests a pattern or practice of discrimination in public accommodations, please write to us. Individuals who believe that a place of public accommodation has violated Title II may file their own lawsuit in federal court and may some rights under other federal laws, state laws, or local ordinances and should consult with your local or state civil rights enforcement agency.

If you believe that a local government has adopted or has enforced land use regulations that discriminate against religious assemblies and institutions or which unjustifiably burden religious exercise.

The Department of Justice can bring an action for injunctive or declaratory relief to enforce compliance with the Religious Land Use and Institutionalized Persons Act (RLUIPA). If you have information that suggests there has been a violation of this statute, please write to us. Individuals who have information that suggests a violation may also file a lawsuit in federal or states court.

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Updated August 6, 2015

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