Federal Agency Resources

This resource page identifies examples of grants, training and technical assistance, and other Federal resources of particular interest to non-profit organizations and government agencies working to enhance civil legal aid for underserved populations. Please contact the issuing entity for more information about all resources. This page includes grants that legal aid programs can apply for directly, or indirectly as a sub-grantee partner to local and State governments or other social services providers and universities. The list is not intended to be comprehensive of all Federal resources that can be used to support or engage civil legal aid. Suggestions for additions can be sent to: LAIR@usdoj.gov

To read about currently open Department of Justice grants, and training and technical assistance, of particular interest to entities working to enhance both civil legal aid and indigent defense, please visit the Access to Justice Initiative’s Grant Information page. This page occasionally also features relevant grants from other federal agencies. For a comprehensive listing of all federal grants, please visit www.grants.gov.

Consumer Financial Protection Bureau

Department of Health & Human Services

Corporation for National & Community Service

Department of Homeland Security

Federal Trade Commission

Department of Housing & Urban Development

Legal Services Corporation (LSC)

Department of the Interior – Bureau of Indian Affairs

National Science Foundation

Department of Justice

Social Security Administration

Department of Labor

United States Agency for International Development (USAID)

Department of the Treasury

Department of Agriculture

Department of Veterans Affairs

Department of Education

 

Tips on Finding and Applying for Federal Grants

Information Resource = Federal Agency information/resource relevant to civil legal aid providers
Grant = Federal grant that expressly includes or allows for civil legal aid

  Consumer Financial Protection Bureau

Information ResourceFinancial Coaching Project

The CFPB’s financial coaching project, launched in 2015, co-locates financial coaches in organizations and agencies that serve veterans and low-income and economically vulnerable consumers.  Of the 20 sites that serve the low-income and vulnerable populations, five are legal aid or volunteer lawyer organizations.  The coaches are helping clients address their financial challenges and issues through one-on-one, client-directed financial coaching. 

Information ResourceYour Money, Your Goals: A Financial Empowerment Toolkit

In April 2015, the CFPB launched Your Money, Your Goals: A financial empowerment toolkit for legal aid organizations, with four legal aid partner organizations from across the country. In 2016, the CFPB is working with an additional six legal aid organizations to integrate the toolkit into their work. The toolkit includes actionable information and tools for front-line staff to help clients identify financial challenges and goals, understand their consumer financial protection rights, and access relevant resources.  More than 450 legal aid attorneys and staff have participated through the train-the-trainer format via in-person and webinar trainings.  For more information, please visit www.consumerfinance.gov/empowerment.

  Corporation for National & Community Service

Information ResourceLSC Funds as Matching Funds for Grants Funded by the Corporation for National and Community Service

In a December 2, 2014 letter, LSC clarified that its grantees may use LSC funds as matching funds in AmeriCorps grants and other grants funded by the Corporation for National and Community Service.

Information ResourceGuide to the AmeriCorps State and National Program for Legal Services Organizations

The U.S. Department of Justice Office for Access to Justice and the Corporation for National and Community Service, published a Guide to the AmeriCorps State and National Program for Legal Services Organizations. The Guide is designed to introduce the AmeriCorps program to legal services organizations that are not familiar with the program; demonstrate how AmeriCorps can work effectively in the context of legal services to expand the organization’s reach and provide more direct legal services; and provide additional resources for organizations interested in using national service to advance their mission. Thanks to contributions by 10 current or recent AmeriCorps legal services program grantees, the Appendix contains a variety of position descriptions and other illustrative documents.

Information ResourceGuide to the AmeriCorps VISTA Program for Legal Services Organizations

The U.S. Department of Justice Office for Access to Justice and the Corporation for National and Community Service, published a Guide to the AmeriCorps VISTA Program for Legal Services Organizations. The Guide is designed to introduce the VISTA program to legal services organizations that are not familiar with it program; demonstrate how the VISTA program can work effectively in the context of legal services; and provide additional resources for organizations that are interested in sponsoring a VISTA project at their site. Thanks to contributions by 10 current or recent VISTA legal services program sponsors, the Appendix contains more than two dozen sample project descriptions to illustrate the range of ways VISTA members can benefit a legal aid program.

GrantAmeriCorps State and National Grants

In the FY 2016 AmeriCorps competition, CNCS seeks to prioritize the investment of national service resources in economic opportunity, education, veterans and military families, environment, disaster services, Elder Justice AmeriCorps, Governor and Mayor Initiatives., and programming that supports My Brother’s Keeper. CNCS will continue to focus on national service programs that seek to improve academic outcomes for children, youth, and young adults. CNCS will also focus investment in programs that increase safer communities through activities that focus on public safety and preventing and mitigating civil unrest, as well as investment in programs that primarily serve communities with limited resources and organizational infrastructure.

Eligible Grantees: Native American tribal organizations; public and state controlled institutions of higher education; nonprofits that do not have 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of higher education; city or township governments; nonprofits having a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of higher education; public housing authorities and Indian housing authorities; independent school districts; special district governments; county governments; state governments; and private institutions of higher education.

Prior Deadline: 01/20/2016

GrantSocial Innovation Fund – Corporation for National & Community Service

The 2015 Social Innovation Fund grant competition provides up to $51 million to eligible grant-making institutions seeking to grow innovative, evidence-based solutions to challenges facing low-income communities nationwide. Its purpose is to grow the impact of innovative community-based solutions that have compelling evidence of improving the lives of people in low-income communities throughout the United States. The Fund directs resources toward increasing the evidence-based capacity and scale of the organizations it funds in order to improve the lives of people served by those organizations. The Innovation Fund also generates broader impact by leveraging grant funding to improve philanthropies, federal government departments and agencies, state and local government, and community-based organizations to deploy funds to address social challenges. Additionally, it enhances the ability of the nonprofit sector to support the growth of innovative, high-impact organizations.

Funding Source: Corporation for National & Community Service

Eligible Grantees: Existing grant making institutions or eligible partnerships.

Prior Deadline: 3/17/2015

GrantAmeriCorps VISTA

AmeriCorps VISTA is committed to its mission of bringing individuals and communities out of poverty. AmeriCorps VISTA members make a year-long, full-time commitment to serve on a specific project at a nonprofit organization or public agency, and focus their efforts to build the organizational, administrative, and financial capacity of organizations that fight illiteracy, improve health services, foster economic development, and otherwise assist low-income communities.

Eligible Grantees: Public, private, or faith-based nonprofit organizations, as well as local, state, or federal agencies.

Prior Deadline: Ongoing

  Federal Trade Commission

Information ResourceLegal Services Collaboration

The FTC organized a nationwide team of its lawyers into a Legal Services Collaboration to identify consumer protection issues affecting low income communities and to develop partnerships focusing on law enforcement and consumer education strategies. The FTC meets regularly with legal aid lawyers around the country to share information, hold informal brownbags and teleconferences, and conduct webinars hosted by the Legal Services Corporation. Information from legal services partners has concretely benefitted the agency’s law enforcement and policy activities, as well as spurring the creation of www.consumer.gov, a consumer education resource for clients of legal services organizations. For more information, see WH-LAIR’s publication on FTC’s Legal Services Collaboration: Enhancing Enforcement Through Collaboration with Civil Legal Aid.

Information ResourceWebinar

The FTC invites legal services offices to join its listserv, which announces and provides links to participate in the quarterly FTC webinars hosted by the Legal Services Corporation. The webinars inform participants about consumer protection law enforcement and policy developments of common concern, and to disseminate resources for them and their clients. To join the listserv, legal aid providers should email mvaca@ftc.gov.

Information ResourceWebinar

FTC and LSC partnered to produce a series of webinars about consumer issues including scams involving money and credit, online privacy and security, and more. Geared towards legal aid organizations, these webinars include ‘Unauthorized Billing and Charges on Consumers Accounts: What Can You and Your Clients Do to Fight Back?’and ‘New Resources to Prevent and Recover from Identity Theft’ and can be found here under the “Consumer” heading.

Information ResourceRaise awareness of Know Your Rights materials

The FTC collaborates with Pro Bono Net (nonprofit providing resources for pro bono and legal aid attorneys and others working to assist low income or disadvantaged clients) to add the FTC's Know Your Rights materials to websites for the general public such as the www.lawhelp.org, and related websites for service providers including a primary portal for pro bono volunteers, http://www.probono.net/.

Legal Services Corporation (LSC)

Grant Basic Field Grants

LSC provides funding to 134 independent non-profit legal aid programs in every state, the District of Columbia, and in U.S. territories. LSC provides Basic Field Grants through a competitive bidding process and awards funding for up to three years to qualified attorneys, legal aid organizations, and entities as a means of improving access to justice for low-income people.  

Applications are accepted for specified service areas. The three types of service areas are:

  1. General: To provide legal services to the general low-income population living in a specific geographical area.
  2. Native American: To provide legal services to Native Americans living in a specific geographical area, related to their status as Native Americans.
  3. Migrant: To provide legal services to Migrant and other Agricultural Workers living in a specific geographical area, related to their status as Agricultural Workers.

The Basic Field Grants are awarded annually, but different service areas may be in competition at different times during the year.

Eligible Grantees: Current recipients; nonprofit organizations that have, as a purpose, the provision of legal help to eligible clients; private attorneys or group of attorneys or law firms (either as a non-incorporated body or as a nonprofit); state or local governments; and sub-state regional planning or coordination agencies that are composed of sub-state areas whose governing boards are controlled by locally-elected officials.

GrantEmergency Relief Grants

The Emergency Relief Grants provide funding to LSC grantees in service areas with government-declared emergencies. The funding is offered to mitigate damage sustained by the grantee and to provide legal help to low-income people affected by the disaster.

Eligible Grantees: Current LSC basic field grant recipients who provide service in an area where there has been a government-declared emergency.

GrantLeadership Development Program

The G. Duane Vieth Leadership Development Program is a national grant initiative to support leadership training and development for LSC grantee directors. By creating a dedicated pool of funds specifically for leadership development, grants awarded through this program will provide civil legal aid leaders with targeted support to improve their effectiveness.
Eligible Grantees: Current LSC basic field grant recipients.

Prior Deadline: 7/15/2016

GrantPro Bono Innovation Fund

The Pro Bono Innovation Fund is designed to support the development of new and robust pro bono efforts and partnerships that will effectively serve more low-income people. The Fund offers grants for new pro bono initiatives, collaborations, and partnerships to engage more lawyers and other professionals in pro bono service, address gaps in legal services, and address persistent challenges in pro bono delivery systems. This grant program is awarded on an annual cycle. To apply, an organization must submit a letter of intent in March and a full application in July.

Eligible Grantees: Current LSC basic field grant recipients.

Prior Deadline: 7/18/2016

GrantTechnology Initiative Grant Program

Technology Initiative Grants (TIG) seek to improve legal services delivery to the low-income population and to increase access by low-income persons to high quality legal services, to the judicial system, and to legal information. TIG funding has provided LSC with a remarkable opportunity to explore new ways to serve eligible persons, to help build legal aid programs' capacities, and to support the efforts of pro bono attorneys. These projects use a broad range of technologies -- including mobile, cloud computing, data analysis, and automated document assembly -- to make the delivery of legal services in the United States more efficient and effective. This grant program is awarded on an annual cycle. To apply, an organization must submit a letter of intent in February and a full application in May.

Eligible Grantees: Current LSC basic field grant recipients.

Prior Deadline: 5/31/2016

GrantVeterans Appeals Pro Bono Grant Program

The Veterans Appeals Pro Bono Grant facilitates the provision of high-quality legal and other assistance, without charge, to veterans and other individuals who are unable to afford the cost of legal representation in connection with decisions of, or other proceedings in, the U.S. Court of Appeals for Veterans Claims. This grant program is awarded on a three-year cycle.

Eligible Grantees: Non-profit organizations that have as a purpose the provision of free legal assistance to low-income individuals or the provision of free services to veterans; or private attorneys or law firms that seek to establish such a non-profit for these purposes.

Prior Deadline: 12/11/2015

GrantRural Legal Summer Corps

The Rural Legal Summer Corps (RSLC) Program places law students with rural legal aid programs for the summer. The goals of the program include increasing availability of legal services to low-income people in rural areas, developing students’ skills in serving low-income clients, increasing rural legal services programs’ ability to recruit highly qualified law students and new attorneys, and increasing collaboration between law schools and rural legal services programs. The program was developed by LSC and Equal Justice Works and is funded by private donations through LSC’s Campaign for Justice. The program operates from May to August, and awards are made annually.

Eligible Applicants: All applicants must attend an Equal Justice Works member law school; complete their first or second year of law school by the start of their summer placement; be a U.S. citizen, U.S. national or lawful permanent resident (e.g., green card); pass a criminal background check; and possess a valid driver’s license and access to adequate transportation during summer placement.

Prior Deadline: 02/29/2016

Information ResourceCivil Legal Outcomes Toolkit

The Civil Legal Outcomes Toolkit is designed to help legal aid programs with defining, collecting and reporting on metrics that describe their effectiveness—specifically, on outcomes for clients in extended service cases. This toolkit includes detailed instructions, eLearning modules, examples and additional resources for implementing an outcomes management system. The Toolkit can be accessed at http://clo.lsc.gov/.

  National Science Foundation

Information ResourcePractitioner-Scholar Research Agenda Workshop

The National Science Foundation funded a 2012 American Bar Foundation workshop to address the legal aid “research gap,” convening scholars and practitioners to develop and begin work on a new research agenda for access to civil justice. A follow-up workshop in 2013 included presentations of practitioner-scholar proposed research initiatives.

GrantDear Colleague Letter – Stimulating Research Related to the Use and Functioning of the Civil Justice System

The National Science Foundation Law & Social Sciences program invites research on how people and organizations define legal claims, whether and how they mobilize the law on their behalf, and how legal institutions respond to questions about civil justice. Proposals concerning civil justice are invited to consider problems involving and not limited to the following: 1) Individual decisions to engage legal institutions and assistance, and the institutional, cultural, social and economic factors that shape those decisions; 2) Mediating institutions that define, mobilize or manage legal claims, and the differences they make in process and outcomes; and 3) The process and outcomes of decision-making in courts, both trial and appellate.
Eligible Grantees: Except where a program solicitation establishes more restrictive eligibility criteria, individuals and organizations in the following categories may submit proposals: universities and colleges; non-profit, non-academic organizations; for-profit organizations; state and local governments; and certain unaffiliated individuals. More information about eligible proposers may be found in GPG Chapter I.
Prior Deadline: On-going

GrantUS Ignite: Networking Research and Application Prototypes Leading to Smart & Connected Communities

In June 2012, NSF, in partnership with the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) and other Federal agencies, announced US Ignite, an initiative seeking to promote US leadership in the development and deployment of next-generation gigabit applications with the potential for significant societal impact. This solicitation builds on the experience and community infrastructure established through previous US Ignite investments, encouraging the US academic research community, non-profits, and local governments to explore the fundamental challenges of piloting and eventually transitioning into practice next-generation networking.  In 2016, NSF also worked with the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) Office for Access to Justice (ATJ) to identify additional application ideas and prototypes and basic research directions that may serve national priority areas of mutual interest.

Each US Ignite application should address one or more national priority areas, including but not limited to advanced manufacturing, education and workforce, energy, transportation, health, and public safety/emergency preparedness. Among these priority areas are those identified by the White House Legal Aid Interagency Roundtable (WH-LAIR), to which both NSF and the Department of Justice (DOJ) are members. Therefore, potential US Ignite applications that could demonstrate a networking technology advancement that improves access to justice, and informs a research agenda and/or identifies technology priorities for civil legal aid, would be of interest.

Who May Submit Proposals: The categories of proposers eligible to submit US Ignite proposals to the National Science Foundation are identified in the NSF Grant Proposal Guide, Chapter I, Section E.

Prior Deadline: 6/14/2016

  Social Security Administration

GrantProtection and Advocacy

SSA’s Protection and Advocacy of Beneficiaries of Social Security (PABSS) Program serves individuals with disabilities who receive Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits by providing information and advice about obtaining vocational rehabilitation and employment services.  PABSS advocate for or represent beneficiaries in an effort to remove obstacles to attaining employment.  The PABSS grantees offer information, support or other services that beneficiaries with disabilities may need to secure, maintain, or regain gainful employment. Services offered under the PABSS Program include, but are not limited to:

  • Helping clients to secure services from community agencies, including employment networks that provide services under the Ticket to Work program;
  • Helping beneficiaries  understand issues and problems related to their disability benefits;
  • Protecting beneficiaries' rights regarding conditions of employment including minimum wage issues;
  • Helping beneficiaries understand and protect their employment rights, responsibilities and reasonable accommodations under the Americans with Disabilities Act and other applicable laws;
  • Protecting rights to transportation related to employment; and
  • Obtaining vocational rehabilitation and employment related services and supports.

SSA awarded a contract to the National Disability Rights Network (NDRN) in 2015 to provide technical assistance and training, including employment law training to PABSS staff.  NDRN also provides training and technical assistance on administrative systems, management issues, and other operational topics to improve and enhance PABSS services. The NDRN contract is also responsible for the PABSS data collection system.

Information ResourceWorking Interdisciplinary Networks of Guardianship Stakeholders

Working Interdisciplinary Networks of Guardianship Stakeholders (WINGS) networks are “court-community partnerships that drive changes that affect the way courts and guardians practice, and improve the lives of people who need help in decision making.”  SSA has regional representatives who serve on the WINGS groups to enhance coordination between State courts with guardianship jurisdiction and the Representative Payee program.  SSA also worked with WINGS groups to develop a training guide that outlines agency programs, representative payee issues, information about preventing elder abuse, and best practices to enhance guardianship coordination.  This guide will continue to be refined as needed.  SSA’s partnership with WINGS helps the agency to identify ways to strengthen its working relationship with the aging community and with State courts that oversee guardianship proceedings.

Information ResourcePre-Hearing Conference Pilot Program

Under the Pre-Hearing Conference Pilot Program, SSA conducts pre-hearing conferences with self-represented individuals to explain the hearing process and right to a representative and obtain updated records information in preparation for the formal hearing.  The goals for the pre-hearing conference are to (1) reduce hearing no shows and postponements based on a claimant choosing to seek representation, (2) improve the quality and completeness of the record at the time of the hearing, and (3) decrease the need for post-hearing development, and improve the hearings experience for self-represented claimants. 

Information ResourceDisability Research Consortium

The Disability Research Consortium (DRC) consists of two co-operatively funded research centers: Mathematica Policy Research’s Center for Studying Disability Policy and the National Bureau of Economic Research’s Disability Research Center.  SSA funds the centers through five-year cooperative agreements from fiscal year FY 2012 through FY 2017.

The DRC's main goals are to:

  • Research and evaluate a wide array of topics related to Social Security's Disability Insurance and Supplemental Security Income programs and other federal disability policies;
  • Disseminate information on disability issues relevant to policymakers, researchers, stakeholder organizations, and the general public;
  • Better understand the intersection and interaction between SSA and other federal disability-related programs to address the broader social and economic contexts of their administration and operation; and
  • Provide training, education, and opportunities to scholars and practitioners in research areas relevant to Social Security and disability issues.

GrantDisability Determination Process Small Grant Program

SSA administers the Disability Determination Process Small Grant Program.  This program provides stipends to graduate-level students to conduct research on improving the efficiency and reducing the complexity of the disability determination process.  Since 2012, over 20 students have completed projects, and several of these projects address the role of legal services in assisting claimants with the disability application process.

United States Agency for International Development (USAID)

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Grant Human Rights Grants Program (HRGP)

The Human Rights Grants Program (HRGP) supports the development of human rights programs, including innovative projects that respond to urgent or unanticipated human rights needs. This entails encouraging cooperation with local and regional organizations, and enabling USAID Missions to respond to urgent needs and challenges through stand-alone human rights programs or by integrating human rights objectives into current programs and those under design, regardless of sector. Since its inception in 2012, roughly 100 grants have been made to strengthen human rights institutions and increasing access to justice for vulnerable populations around the globe. 

Eligible Grantees: U.S. or non-U.S. entities, such as private, non-profit organizations including private voluntary organizations, universities, research organizations, professional associations, and relevant special interest associations. Interested and qualified organizations must apply for this funding directly through USAID Missions.

Information ResourceUSAID Access to Justice and Rule of Law Programming

USAID’s  global programming strengthens access to justice and rule of law in more than 50 countries around the world. Many of these programs, such as those in Bangladesh, Colombia, Georgia, Kenya, Timor Leste, and Uganda, undertake a holistic and comprehensive approach that integrates strengthening and modernization of formal justice system institutions and actors with components focused on improving rights protections, legal aid, and customary justice and dispute resolution for all members of society, including women. 

Information ResourceGuide to Rule of Law Analysis

 The Guide to Rule of Law Country Analysis presents a strategic framework for conceptualizing the rule of law, analyzing a country’s strengths and weaknesses with regard to rule of law, and designing strategic programs to address rule of law challenges, including those involving access to justice.  It also focuses on how USAID rule of law programs can contribute to the broader goals of democratic and economic development, with particular attention to the empowerment of the poor and vulnerable groups.

Information ResourceGuide to Integrating Rule of Law and Development:  Food Security, Climate Change, and Public Health

This publication is a practical resource for rule of law practitioners, development actors, local stakeholders, and donors for better understanding how rule of law promotion can effectively address issues of food security, public health, and climate change through national strategies, access to justice and legal empowerment, law reform, claims and dispute resolution mechanisms, and anti-corruption programming.  It also describes core principles for rule of law and access to justice programming i.e. active participation of affected communities, substantive gender equality, non-discrimination, attention to vulnerable groups, and accountability.  

Information ResourceLegal Empowerment of the Poor:  From Concepts to Assessment

Legal Empowerment of the Poor (LEP) is a concept that is increasingly used in development discourse and one inextricably linked to access to justice and rule of law programming. This resource examines the fundamental components of LEP—Rights Enhancement, Rights Awareness, Rights Enablement, and Rights Enforcement—and their interconnections. It also identifies opportunities for USAID programming in this area and examines possibilities for assessing progress toward realizing legal empowerment of the poor.

Information ResourceDevelopment Experience Clearing House (DEC)

USAID's Development Experience Clearinghouse, the largest searchable online resource for USAID-funded technical and project materials, including access to justice, makes nearly 200,000 items available for review or download, and continuously grows with more than 1000 items added each month.  The DEC collects research reports, evaluations and assessments, contract information, tutorials, policy and planning documents, activity information sheets, and training material, including those on access to justice activities and issues.  

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   

  U.S. Department of Agriculture

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 GrantOutreach and Assistance for Socially Disadvantaged Farmers and Ranchers and Veteran Farmers and Ranchers Program (“2501 Program”)

The 2501 Program provides resources to assist socially disadvantaged and veteran farmers and ranchers in owning and operating farms and ranches while increasing their participation in agricultural programs and services provided by USDA. This program assists eligible community-based and non-profit organizations, higher education institutions, and tribal entities in providing outreach and technical assistance to socially disadvantaged and veteran farmers and ranchers.

Eligible Grantees: Applications may be submitted by community-based organizations, networks, or coalition of community-based organizations; 1890 or 1994 institutions of higher education; anAmerican Indian tribal community college or an Alaska Native cooperative college; a Hispanic-Serving Institution of higher education (as defined in 7 U.S.C. § 3103); any other institution of higher education (as defined in 20 U.S.C. § 1001) that has demonstrated experience in providing agricultural education or other agricultural-related services to socially disadvantaged farmers and ranchers; and an Indian tribe (as defined in 25 U.S.C. § 450b) or a National tribal organization that has demonstrated experience in providing agricultural education or other agriculturally-related services to socially disadvantaged farmers and ranchers.

Prior Deadline: 7/29/2016

Prior Grantees:  http://www.outreach.usda.gov/grants/index.htm

 GrantFarm Service Agency (FSA)’s Cooperative Agreements

FSA’s cooperative agreements are designed to further support and expand FSA’s existing outreach and education efforts.  There is an emphasis on proposals that propose to address producers who are ethnic minorities, women, new and beginning, veterans, urban, or who grow non-commodity crops

Eligible Grantees: Qualified universities and university-based organizations, and qualified non-governmental organizations or educational institutions who provide outreach and technical assistance.

Prior Deadline:  July 11, 2016

Prior Grantees:  https://www.fsa.usda.gov/programs-and-services/outreach-and-education/outreach-technical-assistance-cooperative-agreements/index

*note: In the most recent round of funding, two civil legal aid organizations received funding: Legal Aid of Nebraska and the Farmers Legal Action Group.

GrantBeginning Farmer Rancher Development Program

The Beginning Farmer Rancher Development Program provides resources to support the development of educational outreach curricula, workshops, educational teams, training, and technical assistance programs to assist beginning farmers and ranchers in the U.S. with entering, establishing, building, and managing successful farm and ranch enterprises.

Eligible Grantees: Applications may be submitted by a collaborative state, local, or regionally-based network or partnership of qualified public and/or private entities. These collaborations may include the following entities: State Cooperative Extension Services; Federal, State, or tribal agencies; community based organizations; nongovernmental organizations; junior and four-year colleges or universities or foundations maintained by a college or university; private for-profit organizations; and other appropriate partners.

Prior Deadline: 1/21/2016

 

  U.S. Department of Education

OFFICE OF INNOVATION AND IMPROVEMENT

GrantPromise Neighborhoods Program – Implementation Grant Competition

The purpose of the Promise Neighborhoods program is to significantly improve the educational and developmental outcomes of children and youth in our most distressed communities and to transform those communities by—(1) Identifying and increasing the capacity of eligible organizations that are focused on achieving results for children and youth throughout an entire neighborhood; (2) Building a complete continuum of cradle-through-college-to-career solutions (continuum of solutions) of both education programs and family and community supports, with great schools at the center. All strategies in the continuum of solutions must be accessible to children with disabilities (CWD) and English learners (ELs); (3) Integrating programs and breaking down agency ‘‘silos’’ so that solutions are implemented effectively and efficiently across agencies; (4) Developing the local infrastructure of systems and resources needed to develop, implement, and sustain effective interventions to improve education outcomes and enhance family and community well-being across the broader region beyond the initial neighborhood; and (5) Learning about the overall impact of the Promise Neighborhoods program and about the relationship between particular strategies in Promise Neighborhoods and student outcomes, including through an evaluation of the program, particular elements within the continuum of solutions, or both.

Eligible Grantees: An eligible organization for this grant is one that: (1) Is representative of the geographic area proposed to be served; (2) Is one of the following: (a) A nonprofit organization that meets the definition of a nonprofit under 34 CFR 77.1(c), which may include a faith-based nonprofit organization. (b) An institution of higher education as defined by section 101(a) of the Higher Education Act of 1965, as amended. (c) An Indian tribe; (3) Currently provides at least one of the solutions  from the applicant’s proposed continuum of solutions in the geographic area proposed to be served; and (4) Operates or proposes to work with and involve in carrying out its proposed project, in coordination with the school’s LEA, at least one public elementary or secondary school that is located within the identified geographic area that the grant will serve.

Prior Deadline: 9/6/2016

Prior Grantees: See the program website at http://www2.ed.gov/programs/promiseneighborhoods/awards.html

OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES

GrantClient Assistance Program

The purpose of this program is to advise and inform clients, client applicants, and other individuals with disabilities of all the available services and benefits under the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended, and of the services and benefits available to them under Title I of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). In addition, grantees may assist and advocate for clients and client applicants in relation to projects, programs, and services provided under the Rehabilitation Act. In providing assistance and advocacy under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act, a CAP agency may provide assistance and advocacy with respect to services that are directly related to employment for the client or client applicant.

Eligible Grantees: Only designated protection and advocacy agencies in each State and Territory may apply. The Governor designates the protection and advocacy agency.

Prior Deadline: Ongoing

Prior Grantees: See the program website at https://rsa.ed.gov/programs.cfm?pc=cap&sub=awards

GrantIndependent Living Services for Older Blind Individuals Program

The Independent Living Services for Older Individuals who are Blind Program supports services to assist individuals aged 55 or older whose recent severe visual impairment makes competitive employment extremely difficult to obtain, but for whom independent living goals are feasible. Funds are used to provide independent living services, conduct activities that will improve or expand services for these individuals and conduct activities to improve public understanding of the problems of these individuals. Services are designed to help persons served under this program to adjust to their blindness by increasing their ability to care for their individual needs.

Eligible Grantees:  Only separate State vocational rehabilitation agencies or combined State vocational rehabilitation agencies serving persons who are blind and visually impaired are eligible to apply.

Prior Deadline:  Ongoing

Prior Grantees: See the program website at https://rsa.ed.gov/programs.cfm?pc=oib&sub=awards

GrantParent Information Centers Program

The purpose of this priority is to fund 41 Parent Training and Information Centers (PTIs) designed to meet the information and training needs of parents of infants, toddlers, children, and youth with disabilities, ages birth through 26 (collectively, ‘‘children with disabilities’’), and the information and training needs of youth with disabilities living in the States, regions of the States, or areas served by the centers. More than 35 years of research and experience has demonstrated that the education of children with disabilities can be made more effective by strengthening the ability of parents to participate fully in the education of their children at school and at home (see section 601(c)(5)(B) of IDEA). Since the Department first funded PTIs over 35 years ago, it has helped parents set high expectations for their children with disabilities and provided parents with the information and training they need to help their children meet those expectations. The following Web site provides further information on the work of currently funded PTIs: www.parentcenterhub.org.

Eligible Grantees: Parent organizations. Note: Section 671(a)(2) of IDEA defines a ‘‘parent organization’’ as a private nonprofit organization (other than an institution of higher education) that— (a) Has a board of directors— (1) The majority of whom are parents of children with disabilities ages birth through 26; (2) That includes— (i) Individuals working in the fields of special education, related services, and early intervention; and (ii) Individuals with disabilities; and (3) The parent and professional members of which are broadly representative of the population to be served, including low-income parents and parents of limited English proficient children; and (b) Has as its mission serving families of children with disabilities who are ages birth through 26, and have the full range of disabilities described in section 602(3) of IDEA.

Prior Deadline: 2/9/2015

Prior Grantees: See the program website at http://www2.ed.gov/programs/oseppic/awards.html

GrantParent Information and Training Program

The purpose of the Parent Information and Training Program is to support projects that provide training and information to enable individuals with disabilities, and the parents, family members, guardians, advocates, or other authorized representatives of the individuals (hereafter collectively referred to as ‘‘individuals with disabilities and their families’’), to participate more effectively with professionals in meeting the vocational, independent living, and rehabilitation needs of individuals with disabilities. These grants are designed to meet the unique training and information needs of those individuals who live in the area to be served, particularly those who are members of populations that have been unserved or underserved by programs under the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended (Rehabilitation Act).

Eligible Grantees:  Private nonprofit organizations that meet the requirements in section 303(c)(4) of the Rehabilitation Act are eligible to apply.

Prior Deadline:  August 11, 2014

GrantProgram of Protection and Advocacy of Individual Rights

The PAIR program supports the protection and advocacy system in each State to protect the legal and human rights of individuals with disabilities. In order to be eligible for advocacy services from the PAIR program, an individual with a disability must meet specific criteria. Each PAIR program must set annual priorities and objectives to meet the needs of individuals with disabilities in each State. Although the objectives and priorities vary from state to state to meet the needs of individuals with disabilities in each state, most PAIR programs set priorities and objectives aimed at reducing barriers to education, employment, transportation, and housing. In addition, PAIR programs advocate on behalf of individuals with significant disabilities to promote community integration and full participation in society.

Eligible Grantees: Only designated protection and advocacy agencies in each State and Territory may apply. The Governor designates the protection and advocacy agency.
Prior Deadline: Ongoing

Prior Grantees: See the program website at https://rsa.ed.gov/programs.cfm?pc=pair&sub=awards

Information ResourceConvening and Community of Practice

The Department of Education, with the support of the Department of Justice’s Bureau of Justice Assistance held an all-day convening for the Second Chance Pell Pilot program on July 19, 2016. Part of the focus of this convening is creating a community of practice among participating institutions to share information, knowledge, and resources. This community of practice included links to WH-LAIR and resources available for participating educational institutions. Institutions which contain law schools were encouraged to leverage legal aid clinics and other legal resources to assist Second Chance Pell participants as they reintegrate into society.

Information ResourcePublication – Reentry Mythbuster

The Department of Education, as part of the Federal Interagency Reentry Council, published a reentry mythbuster around student loan rehabilitation. This mythbuster factsheet is aimed at many community agencies and organizations, including the legal services community, and seeks to clarify existing federal policies pertaining to student financial aid and loan servicing.  This mythbuster as well as other mythbusters relevant to the legal aid community are available at: https://csgjusticecenter.org/nrrc/projects/mythbusters/.

Information ResourceWebsite

The Department of Education made available a website of Educational Resources for Immigrants, Refugees, Asylees and other New Americans.  The website contains resources that support a number of immigrant populations, including immigrant children (e.g., unaccompanied youth) and the children of immigrants, Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) children and youth, immigrant families, adult immigrants (e.g. refugees, asylees), foreign-born professionals, migrant students, teachers of English learners and foreign languages, and receiving communities. The website is geared toward learners, teachers, schools and communities support all three pillars of immigrant integration: civic, economic, and linguistic integration.  The link to the website is available at http://www2.ed.gov/print/about/overview/focus/immigration-resources.html

  U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES (ACF)

GrantServices for Survivors of Torture Program: Direct Services for Survivors of Torture

While legal services are an allowable expense in this FOA, please note that this FOA is not expressly dedicated to funding legal aid. The main purpose of the Direct Services grant program is to increase survivors’ access to holistic, strengths-based, and trauma-informed services to assist them in the healing and recovery process. Under this grant program, direct services are provided to refugees, asylum seekers, asylees, certain immigrant classes, and United States citizens who have been tortured on foreign soil. The program requires a holistic approach to service delivery that involves providing medical, psychological, legal, and social work services to promote healing from the effects of torture.

Eligible Grantees: Open to all entities subject to exceptions as specified in the grant announcement.

Prior Deadline: 6/24/2015

GrantHome Study and Post Release Services for Unaccompanied Children (UC)

While legal services are an allowable expense in this FOA, please note that this FOA is not expressly dedicated to funding legal aid.  This grant allows providers to coordinate and administer home studies and post release services for select unaccompanied children in Office of Refugee Resettlement custody. Post release service providers assist the sponsor in accessing applicable legal service resources, and monitor and help facilitate the sponsor’s plan in an effort to ensure the UC’s attendance at all immigration court proceedings and compliance with DHS requirements.

Eligible Grantees: Open to all entities subject to exceptions as specified in the grant announcement.

Deadline: 7/25/2016

GrantResidential Services for Unaccompanied Alien Children

The Office of Refugee Resettlement/Division of Children’s Services (ORR/DCS) provides temporary shelter care and other child welfare related services to Unaccompanied Children (UC) in ORR custody. Residential care services begin once ORR accepts a UC for placement and ends when the minor is released from ORR custody, turns 18 years of age, or the minor’s immigration case results in a final disposition. Care providers are required to inform UC of the availability of free legal assistance, the right to be represented by counsel at no expense to the federal government, and the rights victims of trafficking have under the Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorization Act of 2008.

Eligible Grantees: Open to all entities subject to exceptions as specified in the grant announcement.

Deadline: 8/1/2016

GrantCommunity Services Block Grant

While legal services are an allowable expense in this FOA, please note that this FOA is not expressly dedicated to funding legal aid. The Community Services Block Grant provides funds to alleviate the causes and conditions of poverty in communities. CSBG funding supports projects that lessen poverty in communities; address the needs of low-income individuals including the homeless, migrants, and the elderly; and provides services and activities addressing employment, education, better use of available income, housing, nutrition, emergency services, and/or health. CSBG hopes to achieve for low-income individuals increased self-sufficiency, improved living conditions, ownership of and pride in their communities, and strong family and support systems.

Eligible Grantees: States; the District of Columbia; the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico; U.S. territories; federally and state-recognized Indian Tribes and tribal organizations; community action agencies; migrant and seasonal farm workers; and other organizations specifically designated by the states.

Prior Deadline: Ongoing

GrantCommunity-Based Grants for the Prevention of Child Abuse and Neglect

While legal services are an allowable expense in this FOA, please note that this FOA is not expressly dedicated to funding legal aid. The formula grant program provides funding to States to develop, operate, expand, and enhance community-based, prevention-focused programs and activities designed to strengthen and support families to prevent child abuse and neglect. Some of the core features of the program include: an emphasis on promoting parent leadership and participation in the planning, implementation and evaluation of prevention programs; interagency collaborations with public and private entities in the State to form a child abuse prevention network to promote a greater coordination of resources; and support programs such as voluntary home visiting programs, parenting programs, family resource centers, respite and crisis care, parent mutual support, and other family support programs.

Eligible Grantees: Eligibility is determined by the lead agency in every State.

Prior Deadline: Ongoing

GrantTemporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF)

While legal services are an allowable expense in this FOA, please note that this FOA is not expressly dedicated to funding legal aid. TANF is designed to help needy families achieve self-sufficiency. The purposes of TANF are to: provide assistance to needy families so that children can be cared for in their own homes; reduce the dependency of needy parents by promoting job preparation, work, and marriage; prevent and reduce unplanned pregnancies among single young adults; and encourage the formation and maintenance of two-parent families.  TANF provides for a Family Violence Option, enabling states to certify that they will screen to identify domestic violence victims while maintaining their confidentiality, refer those victims to supportive services, and waive program requirements such as time limits on the receipt of benefits, work requirements, or cooperation with child support enforcement if those requirements make it more difficult to escape the violence or would unfairly penalize the victim.

Prior Deadline: Ongoing

GrantSocial Services Block Grant Program

While legal services are an allowable expense in this FOA, please note that this FOA is not expressly dedicated to funding legal aid. Social Services Block Grants enable each State or Territory to meet their residents’ needs through locally relevant social services. The grants support programs that allow communities to achieve or maintain economic self-sufficiency and to prevent, reduce, or eliminate dependency on social services. Some of the funded initiatives include: daycare; protective services; special services to persons with disabilities; adoption; transportation; substance abuse; housing; and employment services. Legal services are included under the uniform definition of services, and applicable legal services or activities may include receiving and preparing cases for trial; provision of legal advice; representation at hearings; and counseling.

Eligible Grantees: Funds are awarded directly to States. Each State has the flexibility to determine what services will be provided, who is eligible to receive services, and how funds are distributed among various services within the State. States and/or local agencies (i.e., county, city, regional offices) may provide services directly or purchase them from qualified providers.

Prior Deadline: Ongoing

GrantFamily Violence Prevention and Services Program Grants

While legal services are an allowable expense in this FOA, please note that this FOA is not expressly dedicated to funding legal aid. The Family Violence Prevention and Services Program administers the Family Violence Prevention and Services Act (FVPSA), the primary federal funding stream dedicated to the support of emergency shelter and related assistance for victims of domestic violence and their children.  Family Violence Prevention and Services Grant Programs include: Family Violence Prevention and Services Formula Grants to States and Territories; Family Violence Prevention and Services Grants to Tribes; State Domestic Violence Coalitions; Discretionary Programs; Resource Centers; National Domestic Violence Hotline

Eligible Grantees: To accomplish this work the FVPSA Program provides grants to states, territories, tribes, state domestic violence coalitions and national resource centers.

Prior Deadline: Ongoing

ADMINISTRATION FOR COMMUNITY LIVING/ ADMINISTRATION ON AGING (AOA)

Information Resource National Center on Law and Elder Rights

Under a new contract awarded effective 8/1/16 the National Center on Law and Elder Rights (NCLER)empowers professionals in aging/disability and legal networks with the tools and resources necessary to provide older clients and consumers with high quality legal assistance in areas of critical importance to their independence, health, and financial security. As a streamlined and accessible point of entry, the NCLER will support the leadership, knowledge, and systems capacity of legal and aging provider organizations in order to enhance the quality, cost effectiveness, and accessibility of legal assistance and elder rights protections available to older persons with social or economic needs.

The NCLER provides resource support to aging/disability, legal, and elder rights networks through a strategic combination of Case Consultation, Legal Training, and Technical Assistance on a broad range of priority legal issues and systems development issues. Types of pervasive legal issues to be addressed by the NCLER include preventing the loss of seniors’ homes through foreclosure, protecting against consumer scams and debt collection harassment, addressing elder abuse in the community and in long-term care facilities, and  asserting the rights of elders to  public benefits to which they are entitled that preserve financial security, independence, and health. The NCLER provides Technical Assistance on the efficient, cost effective, and targeted provision of state-wide legal and elder rights advocacy services.

Eligible Vendors:  National nonprofit organizations experienced in providing support and technical assistance on a nationwide basis to States, area agencies on aging, legal assistance providers, ombudsmen, elder abuse prevention programs, and other organizations interested in the legal rights of older individuals.

Prior Deadline:  8/1/2016

GrantNational Elder Abuse and Neglect Prevention/Adult Protective Services (APS) Resource Center

The purpose of this Resource Center is to provide current and relevant information and support to enhance the quality, consistency, and effectiveness of elder abuse prevention activities conducted by Adult Protective Services programs across the country. In addition to casework services, APS may provide or arrange for the provision of medical, social, economic, legal, housing, law enforcement or other protective or emergency support services.

Eligible Grantees: Domestic public or private non-profit entities including state and local governments, Indian tribal governments and organizations (American Indian/Alaskan Native/Native American), faith-based organizations, community-based organizations, hospitals, and intuitions of higher education.

Prior Deadline: 9/16/2013

GrantLegal Assistance – Title III-B Providers

Legal assistance provided under Title III-B is part of the essential core of AoA’s legal assistance and elder rights programs. The Title III-B legal services network can provide important assistance for older persons in accessing long-term care options and other community-based services. Legal services under Title III-B also protect older persons against direct challenges to their independence, choice, and financial security. These legal services are specifically targeted to “older individuals with economic or social needs.”

Eligible Grantees: State and local agencies.

Prior Deadline: Ongoing

GrantModel Approach to Statewide Legal Assistance Systems – Phase II

Model Approaches to Statewide Legal Assistance Systems - Phase II (Model Approaches - Phase II), the Administration for Community Living (ACL) continues and expands its support for state leadership efforts in implementing well integrated and cost effective legal service delivery systems that maximize the impact of limited legal resources targeted to older adults in greatest need. The ultimate goal of this grant is to promote and support the continued evolution of legal service delivery systems created through Model Approaches to Statewide Legal Assistance Systems - Phase I (Model Approaches - Phase I) towards higher levels of capacity, performance, and service delivery impact. Model Approaches - Phase II will move statewide legal service delivery systems towards greater accessibility for older adults presenting legal issues; seamless systemic integration of vital low cost legal service delivery mechanisms; precise targeting and outreach to older adults in the greatest social or economic need; improved responsiveness to legal issues that emerge from elder abuse, neglect, and financial exploitation; expanded knowledge and expertise of aging and legal service providers; implementation of legal service delivery standards/guidelines, and data collection and reporting systems that measure legal program results and demonstrate tangible impact on the independence, health, and financial security of older adults.

Eligible Grantees: The 28 eligible states that have previously received Model Approaches – Phase I funding, either through state units on aging or other eligible entities.

Prior Deadline: 8/1/2016

GrantPension Counseling & Information Program: National Pension Assistance Resource Center

Through this funding opportunity announcement, the Administration on Aging awarded one cooperative agreement for a Technical Resource and Assistance Center to support the Pension Counseling and Information Program’s grantees and others, and to encourage coordination among projects, State and Areas Agencies on Aging, legal services providers, and other potential providers of pension assistance by providing substantive legal training, technical assistance programmatic coordination, and nationwide outreach, information and referral.

Eligible Grantees: Domestic public or private nonprofit entities including state and local governments, Indian tribal governments and organizations (American Indian/Alaskan Native/Native American), faith-based organizations, community-based organizations, hospitals, and institutions of higher education, with a proven record of advising and representing individuals who have been denied employer or union-sponsored retirement income benefits, and which have the capacity to provide services under the program on a national basis.

Prior Deadline: 4/29/2013

GrantProtection and Advocacy State Systems

ACL provides four annual grant awards to the designated Protection and Advocacy agencies (P&A) in each state and territory to support advocacy on behalf of individuals with disabilities. These grants are the Protection and Advocacy for Individuals with Developmental Disabilities and Protection and Advocacy for Individuals with Traumatic Brain Injury grants, which fund assistance to individuals with designated disabilities, and the Protection and Advocacy for Assistive Technology and Protection and Advocacy for Voting Access grants, which fund advocacy for individuals with any disability.  P&As also receive funding for advocacy from HHS’ Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration (SAMHSA),  the Department of Education and the Social Security Administration. Together, these federal grants fund comprehensive legal advocacy for individuals with all types of disabilities. P&As are authorized by federal law to protect and advance the civil rights of people with disabilities through legal representation, investigation of abuse and neglect, and systemic advocacy.   Each P&A offers individuals with disabilities free legal services as well as information and referral, training to support of self-advocacy and civil rights education.

Eligible Grantees: Domestic public or private nonprofit entities including state and local governments designated by the Governor or the State or Territory

Prior Deadline: Ongoing

GrantPension Counseling & Information Program: National Pension Assistance Resource Center

Through this funding opportunity announcement, the Administration on Aging awarded one cooperative agreement for a Technical Resource and Assistance Center to support the Pension Counseling and Information Program’s grantees and others, and to encourage coordination among projects, State and Areas Agencies on Aging, legal services providers, and other potential providers of pension assistance by providing substantive legal training, technical assistance programmatic coordination, and nationwide outreach, information and referral.

Eligible Grantees: Domestic public or private nonprofit entities including state and local governments, Indian tribal governments and organizations (American Indian/Alaskan Native/Native American), faith-based organizations, community-based organizations, hospitals, and institutions of higher education, with a proven record of advising and representing individuals who have been denied employer or union-sponsored retirement income benefits, and which have the capacity to provide services under the program on a national basis.

Prior Deadline: 4/29/2013

CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES (CMS)

Information ResourceFactsheet about legal aid and healthcare outreach

As millions of Americans become eligible for new, affordable health insurance options in 2014, HHS CMS recognized that legal aid programs can play a vital role in making sure people learn how to get coverage and get help applying. Legal aid takes its place alongside other outreach and enrollment partners with a fact sheet outlining “Ten Ways Legal Aid can Promote New Health Insurance Opportunities”.

GrantConnecting Kids to Coverage Outreach and Enrollment (Cycle IV)

These funds support targeted strategies needed to enroll eligible, but uninsured, children into Medicaid or CHIP.  Grant funding supports 38 community organizations in 27 states with providing activities, including application assistance, that emphasize increasing enrollment in Medicaid and CHIP in areas where access to health coverage has been lagging and in subgroups of children with lower than average health coverage rates (i.e., teens, Hispanics,   American Indians,, and children in rural areas) .  These grants build upon successful strategies facilitated by previous grant funding initiatives.  These grants will support participation in key outreach initiatives coordinated by the Connecting Kids to Coverage National Campaign.

Eligible Grantees: States with an approved child health plan; local governments; Indian tribes or tribal consortium; tribal organizations and urban Indian organizations; Federal health safety net organizations; national, state, local, or community-based public or nonprofit private organizations including organizations that use community health workers or community-based doula programs; faith based organizations or consortia; and elementary or secondary schools.

CMS intends to release a separate funding opportunity announcement for outreach and enrollment of American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) applicants at the end of 2016. Potential applicants should look for updates regarding this future FOA on www.insurekidsnow.gov

Prior Deadline: 1/20/2016 (See note above for the AI/AN FOA)

GrantConsumer Assistance Program Grants

The Consumer Assistance Program Grants provide the resources necessary to help educate and provide accurate information to consumers who are making difficult health care decisions. These programs empower consumers by providing direct services to answer health care questions, and expand consumer assistance efforts on the state level, including: helping consumers enroll in health coverage; helping consumers file complaints and appeals against health plans; educating consumers about their rights and empowering them to take action; and tracking consumer complaints to help identify problems and strengthen enforcement.

Eligible Grantees: State insurance departments, state attorneys general offices, independent state consumer assistance agencies, or other state agencies. States and territories may also partner with nonprofit organizations that have a track record of working with consumers.

Prior Deadline: 07/09/2012

GrantNavigator Grant

The Affordable Care Act requires Marketplaces to establish a Navigator program to help consumers understand new coverage options and find the most affordable coverage that meets their health care needs. Each Marketplace will have at least two types of entities serving as Navigators, and at least one type of entity will be a community and consumer-focused nonprofit organization. Navigators have expertise in eligibility and enrollment rules and procedures; the range of qualified health plan options and insurance affordability programs; the needs of underserved and vulnerable populations (such as rural populations and individuals with limited English proficiency); and privacy and security standards.

Eligible Grantees: Self-employed individuals and private and public entities proposing to operate as Marketplace Navigators in states with a Federally-facilitated and State Partnership Marketplace. At least two types of entities will serve in each Marketplace, and at least one type of Navigator entity will be a community and consumer-focused nonprofit. Other entities may include, but are not limited to, trade, industry and professional associations; commercial fishing industry organizations; ranching and farming organizations; chambers of commerce; unions; resource partners of the Small Business Administration; licensed insurance agents and brokers; Indian tribes, tribal organizations, and urban Indian organizations; State or local human services agencies; and other public or private entities.

Prior Deadline: 06/15/2015

HEALTH RESOURCES AND SERVICES ADMINISTRATION (HRSA)

GrantMaternal and Child Health Services Block Grant Program

The Federal Title V Maternal and Child health program provides a foundation for ensuring the health of the Nation’s mothers, women, children, and youth, including children and youth with special health care needs, and their families. The program seeks to ensure access to quality care, especially for low-income individuals; to provide and ensure access to preventive care; to implement family-centered, community-based, systems of coordinated care for children with special healthcare needs; and to increase the number of children receiving health assessments and follow-up diagnostic and treatment services.

Eligible Grantees: State Maternal and Child Health agencies, which are usually located within a State health department.
Prior Deadline: Ongoing

Information ResourceTraining and Technical Assistance for Medical-Legal Partnerships

The Health Resources and Services Administration funds a National Training and Technical Assistance Cooperative Agreement with the National Center for Medical Legal Partnership (NCMLP) to support the integration of civil legal aid services into the health care setting to address social determinants that negatively impact patients’ health. As part of the three-year award, the NCMLP serves as a technical assistance center developing resources, toolkits and providing trainings for health centers. They have developed a resource page which provides materials to help develop and maintain a medical-legal partnership at a health center.  The resource page is available at: http://medical-legalpartnership.org/healthcenters/.  Resources include:

  • “Medical-Legal Partnership and Health Centers: Addressing Patients’ Health-Harming Civil Legal Needs as Part of Primary Care” available at: http://medical-legalpartnership.org/hc-issue-brief/  This issue brief shares how medical-legal partnerships operate at health centers and how integrated legal care can help health centers meet their mission.
  • “Using Health Center Needs Assessments to Address Legal Needs” available at: http://medical-legalpartnership.org/needs-assessment-fact-sheet/ This fact sheet outlines how health centers can use needs assessments to understand and meet their patients’ health-harming civil legal needs.
  • “Civil Legal Aid 101 for Health Care” available at:  http://medical-legalpartnership.org/new-resource-civil-legal-aid-101-health-care/ This  tool provides an overview of the composition, role, limitations, and impact of civil legal aid for health care partners. There is also an accompanying messaging guide to help HRSA-funded health centers understand medical-legal partnership.

Eligible Grantees: Community Health Centers funded under the Health Center Program

Prior Deadline: Ongoing

Information ResourceWebinar

The Health Resources and Services Administration convened the webinar, “From Zero to 60: Medical-Legal Partnership Fundamentals & Strategies”, to help participants understand: 1) the medical-legal partnership approach and alignment with health center priorities and enabling services;  2) the skills, resources and capacity of the civil legal aid community; and 3) the opportunities for multi-sector engagement across all health centers and civil legal aid offices.

Addressing patients' health-harming civil legal needs as part of primary care has emerged as a critical strategy for HRSA-funded Community Health Centers seeking to address the social determinants of health. Health centers can incorporate civil legal aid as part of the healthcare team to help meet the housing, income, education and other needs of low-income populations. Core components of a successful medical-legal partnership feature strong integration of the health and legal partners, shared priorities, funding and mission, and shared communication and training strategies.

The March 2016 webinar is archived here.

SUBSTANCE ABUSE AND MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES ADMINISTRATION

GrantJoint Adult Drug Court Solicitation to Enhance Services, Coordination, and Treatment

This joint SAMHSA/Department of Justice Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA) program supports a court program managed by a non-adversarial and multidisciplinary team that responds to the offenses and treatment needs of offenders who have a substance use disorder (SUD). Eligible drug court models include Tribal Healing to Wellness Courts, Driving While Intoxicated (DWI)/Driving Under the Influence (DUI) Courts, Co-Occurring Courts where those participants possess a substance abuse-related charge and substance abuse diagnosis, and Veterans Courts, that adhere to the Drug Court 10 key components in “Defining Drug Courts: The Key Components” and serve substance-abusing adults in the respective problem-solving court.

Eligible grantees: states or state courts applying on behalf of a single jurisdiction; local courts; counties; other units of local government; or federally recognized Indian tribal governments (as determined by the Secretary of the Interior).

Prior deadline: 6/1/2015

  U.S. Department of Homeland Security

U.S. CITIZENSHIP AND IMMIGRATION SERVICES  

GrantCitizenship and Integration Grant Program (Citizenship Instruction and Naturalization Application Services)

 The goal of this program is to expand the availability of high quality citizenship preparation services for lawful permanent residents in communities across the nation. Additional activities that support this goal include: 1) Making citizenship instruction and naturalization application services accessible to low-income and other underserved lawful permanent resident populations; 2) Developing, identifying, and sharing promising practices in citizenship preparation; 3) Supporting innovative and creative solutions to barriers faced by those seeking naturalization; 4) Increasing the use of and access to technology in citizenship preparation programs; and 5) Incorporating strategies to foster welcoming communities. In recognition of the role that legal services can play in meeting the objectives of the grant, nonprofit legal aid organizations are among those eligible to apply for funding either as lead applicant or as a sub-awardee. The Notice of Funding Opportunity further states: “[The primary legal service provider]…must have at least one attorney on staff as a paid employee with experience providing clients with naturalization representation at the applicant organization or at a sub-awardee organization. Pro bono or volunteer attorneys may be used to supplement the program.”

Eligible Grantees: City or township governments, county governments, independent school districts, Native American tribal governments, Native American tribal organizations (other than federally recognized tribal governments), nonprofits with 501(c)(3) IRS status (other than institutions of higher education), private institutions of higher education, public and state controlled institutions of higher education, special district governments and state governments.

Prior Deadlines: 4/22/2016; 5/15/2015; 5/20/2014

Prior Grantees: Since it began in 2009, the Citizenship and Integration Grant Program has been part of a multifaceted effort to provide citizenship preparation resources, support, and information to lawful permanent residents and immigrant-serving organizations. The grant program has awarded 262 competitive grants to numerous organizations among 35 states. 

FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY (FEMA)

Information ResourceDisaster Legal Services

FEMA’s mission is to support our citizens and first responders to ensure that as a nation we work together to build, sustain, and improve our capability to prepare for, protect against, respond to, recover from, and mitigate all hazards.

Under the authority of the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act, 1974, when the President declares a disaster, FEMA, through an agreement with the Young Lawyers Division of the American Bar Association, provides free legal help for survivors of that disaster through the request of the state, local, tribal, and territories. Disaster Legal Services (DLS) provides legal assistance to low-income individuals who, prior to or because of the disaster, are unable to secure legal services adequate to meet their disaster-related needs.

DLS is provided for survivors of presidentially declared major disasters only. Disaster legal advice is limited to cases that will not produce a fee. Cases that may generate a fee are turned over to the local lawyer referral service. The following are the types of disaster legal assistance that local lawyers typically provide:

  • Help with insurance claims for doctor and hospital bills, loss of property, loss of life, etc.
  • Drawing up new wills and other legal papers lost in the disaster
  • Help with home repair contracts and contractors
  • Advice on problems with landlords
  • Help with disaster assistance claims including appeals and recovery actions

More information on DLS can be found at: http://www.benefits.gov/benefits/benefit-details/431

  U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development

GrantContinuum of Care Program

The Continuum of Care Program is designed to promote a community-wide commitment to the goal of ending homelessness; to provide funding for efforts by nonprofit providers, States, and local governments to quickly re-house homeless individuals and families while minimizing the trauma and dislocation caused to homeless individuals, families, and communities by homelessness; to promote access to and effective utilization of mainstream programs by homeless individuals and families; and to optimize self-sufficiency among individuals and families experiencing homelessness.

Eligible Grantees: Private nonprofit organizations, states, local governments, and instrumentalities of state and local governments are eligible to apply if they have been selected by the Continuum of Care for the geographic area in which they operate.

Prior Deadline: 2/3/2014

GrantCommunity Development Block Grant Program

The Community Development Block Grant program is a flexible program that provides communities with resources to address a wide range of unique community development needs. The CDBG program works to ensure decent affordable housing, to provide public services to the most vulnerable in our communities, and to create jobs through the expansion and retention of businesses. Legal services are among the allowable uses of CDBG funds.

Eligible Grantees: General units of local government and States.  Legal service organizations may apply for funds through local government grantees or in partnership with local governments applying to State grantees.

Prior Deadline: Ongoing

GrantEmergency Solutions Grant

The Emergency Solutions Grant (ESG) program assists individuals and families in quickly regaining stability in permanent housing after experiencing a housing crisis or homelessness. The funds are available for five program components: street outreach, emergency shelter, homelessness prevention, rapid re-housing assistance, and data collection. Legal services are among the allowable uses of ESG funds.

Eligible Grantees: State governments, large cities, urban counties, and U.S. territories, who can make the funds available to eligible subrecipients, which can be either local government agencies or private nonprofit organizations.

Prior Deadline: Ongoing

GrantHousing Opportunities for Persons with AIDS

The Housing Opportunities for Persons with AIDS (HOPWA) program, managed by HUD's Office of HIV/AIDS Housing, was established to provide housing assistance and related supportive services for low-income persons living with HIV/AIDS and their families. Two types of grants are made under the HOPWA program. HOPWA formula grants are awarded to eligible States and cities on behalf of their metropolitan areas upon submission and HUD approval of a Consolidated Plan pursuant to the Code of Federal Regulations (24 CFR Part 91), which is published by the Office of the Federal Register. HOPWA competitive program grants are awarded to eligible applicants through the NOFA process, although in some years, funds are available only for renewal projects. HOPWA funds may be used for a wide range of housing, social services, program planning, and development costs. These include, but are not limited to, the acquisition; rehabilitation; or new construction of housing units; costs for facility operations; rental assistance; and short-term payments to prevent homelessness. An essential component in providing housing assistance for this targeted special needs population is the coordination and delivery of support services. Consequently, HOPWA funds also may be used for supportive services including (but not limited to) assessment and case management, substance abuse treatment, mental health treatment, nutritional services, job training and placement assistance, and assistance with daily living.

Eligible Grantees: See specific HOPWA grant.

Prior Deadline: Ongoing

GrantIndian Housing Block Grant Program

The Indian Housing Block Grant (IHBG) Program provides annual block grants to Indian tribes and tribally designated housing entities to provide affordable housing to low-income Native American families. Grant funds may be used for affordable housing development activities, crime prevention and safety activities, housing services, model activities, and more. Housing services activities include legal services to low-income residents of affordable housing, and persons seeking affordable housing assistance.

Eligible Grantees: Indian tribes and tribally designated housing entities.

Prior Deadline: Ongoing

Grant Jobs Plus Program

The Jobs Plus program develops locally-based approaches to increase earnings and advance employment outcomes such as work readiness, employer linkages, job placement, educational advancement and financial literacy. The place-based Jobs Plus program addresses entrenched poverty among public housing residents by offering targeted developments with various incentives and supports including income disregards for working families, employer linkages, job placement and counseling, educational advancement, and financial counseling.  Examples of the types of services that may be provided by grant funds include child care services and/or after school programs, transportation assistance, financial literacy workshops, legal services (e.g., expungement), domestic violence prevention services, services for formerly incarcerated/returning citizens, life skills, and other applicable local business support.

Eligible Grantees: Public housing authorities (PHA) that operate one or more public housing developments (as designated for asset management purposes) that meet the criteria outlined in the Notice of Funding Availability.

Prior Deadline: 6/13/2016

GrantJuvenile Reentry Assistance Program (JRAP)

The Juvenile Reentry Assistance Program seeks to alleviate collateral consequences associated with a juvenile or criminal record by assisting youth up to age 24 residing in public housing, or who would be residing  with a family member in public housing but for their record, with (1) expunging, sealing, and/or correcting juvenile or adult records as permitted by State law, and (2) coordinating supportive services to assist target individuals in mitigating/preventing collateral consequences, for example, reinstating revoked or suspended drivers’ licenses; counseling regarding legal rights and obligations in searching for employment; providing guidance for readmission to school; providing advocacy to occupational licensing agencies; creating or modifying child support orders and other family law services, and more. In this program, expunging/sealing/correcting and other supportive services are not allowed for criminal records of makers of methamphetamine on public housing property, for criminal records of sex offenders on the lifetime sex offender registry, and for criminal records where the crime was domestic violence or a Part I Violent Crime.

Eligible Grantees: Public Housing Authorities (PHAs) who have established a partnership with a legal aid organization, university legal center, public defender's office, or other legal service organization that is a non-profit and has experience providing legal services to juveniles.

Prior Deadline: 1/4/2016

Prior Grantees: See the program website at http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/HUD?src=/press/press_releases_media_advisories/2016/HUDNo_16-056

GrantFair Housing Initiatives Program

The Fair Housing Initiatives Program (FHIP) provides funding to fair housing enforcement organizations and other eligible non-profits to assist people who believe they have been victims of housing discrimination.  FHIP organizations partner with HUD to help people identify government agencies that handle complaints of housing discrimination. They also conduct preliminary investigation of claims, including sending “testers” to properties suspected of practicing housing discrimination. Matched testers are for persons with protected characteristics, such as race, national origin, or presence of children in the household and persons without those protected characteristics with the same financial qualifications who evaluate whether housing providers treat equally-qualified people differently. In addition to funding organizations that provide direct assistance to individuals who feel they have been discriminated against while attempting to purchase or rent housing, FHIP also has initiatives that promote fair housing laws and equal housing opportunity awareness.

Eligible Grantees: Depends on FHIP initiative.

Prior Deadline: 6/23/2016

GrantNational Foreclosure Mitigation Counseling Program

The National Foreclosure Mitigation Counseling (NFMC) program was launched in December 2007 with funds appropriated by Congress to address the nationwide foreclosure crisis by dramatically increasing the availability of housing counseling for families at risk of foreclosure. NeighborWorks America distributes funds to competitively selected grantee organizations, which in turn provide the counseling services, either directly or through sub-grantees.  These grantees include HUD-approved housing counseling intermediaries, state housing finance agencies and NeighborWorks organizations.  Grants also fund legal assistance for homeowners and the training of foreclosure counselors. More than 1,700 counseling agencies participate in the program.

Eligible Grantees: State Housing Finance Agencies, HUD-Approved Housing Counseling Intermediaries, and NeighborWorks organizations with demonstrated experience in foreclosure counseling.

Prior Deadline: 11/18/2013

  U.S. Department of the Interior - Bureau of Indian Affairs

Information ResourceTraining

The U.S. Department of the Interior’s Bureau of Indian Affairs, Office of Justice Services, Office of Tribal Justice Support (OTJS), with the support of the U.S. Department of Justice’s Access to Justice Initiative, launched the Tribal Court Trial Advocacy Training program. This three-day trial advocacy course is designed to improve the trial skills of public defenders – including legal aid providers, judges, and prosecutors who appear in tribal courts. Trainings have been held in Rapid City, S.D.; Phoenix, Ariz.; Duluth, Minn.; Ignacio, Co.; Great Falls, Mont.; Chinle, Navajo Nation (Ariz.); Seattle, Wash; Albuquerque, N.M.; Flagstaff, Ariz.; Missoula, Mont.; Grand Forks, N.D.; Reno, Nev.; and Philadelphia, Miss., and additional trainings are being scheduled for the coming year. All trainings are free and are staffed by attorneys from the Initiative, Assistant United States Attorneys who practice in Indian Country, the Executive Office for U.S. Attorneys’ Native American Issues Coordinator, Assistant Federal Public Defenders, and tribal prosecutors, public defenders, and judges.

GrantTiwahe Initiative

Starting in FY 2015, the Bureau of Indian Affairs distributes program funding to six pilot programs under the Tiwahe Initiative, a program to address family welfare and poverty issues, invests in education, economic development, and sustainable stewardship of natural resources, and advances a strategy to reduce incarceration in Indian Country. A focus of the Tiwahe Initiative is to provide legal representation in civil matters and BIA’s funding is intended, in part, to strengthen access to legal assistance for tribal members. Because the Tiwahe Initiative is a holistic, family focused project to improve access to tribal services, child protection and juvenile justice representation is a primary goal in the pilot program Tribes’ tribal court plans and all six have included plans to use funding to enhance access to civil representation in their courts.  

  U.S. Department of Justice

BUREAU OF JUSTICE ASSISTANCE (BJA)

GrantGuidance regarding allowability of legal services for Second Chance Act grants

Signed into law in 2008, the Second Chance Act (SCA) is designed to improve outcomes for people returning to communities from prisons and jails. U.S. Department of Justice Bureau of Justice Assistance issued guidance informing SCA grant recipients that a wide range of legal services may be an appropriate use of funds where such services further the Second Chance Act’s purpose. The guidance is available here.

GrantSecond Chance Act Reentry Program for Adults with Co-Occurring Substance Abuse and Mental Health Disorders

The goal of this program is to reduce recidivism by improving functional outcomes for individuals with co-occurring substance use and mental disorders, both pre and post release. The objectives of this program are to: 1) increase the screening and assessment that takes place during incarceration; 2) improve the provision of integrated treatment to adults with co-occurring substance use and mental disorders pre and post release from incarceration; and 3) develop reentry plans that are informed by risk and needs assessment. Allowable use of funds under this solicitation includes referral to and payment of legal services related to the purpose of the grant, such as: securing a driver’s license, expunging criminal records, litigating inappropriate denials of housing or employment and violation of the Fair Credit Reporting Act, creating and/or modifying child support orders, and other family law services that help stabilize individuals and families.

Eligible Grantees: States, units of local government, and federally recognized Indian tribal government (as determined by the Secretary of the Interior).

Prior Deadline: 3/30/2016

GrantSecond Chance Act Comprehensive Statewide Adult Recidivism Reduction Planning Program

The objectives for this Program are to fund, at the State level, effective strategies for reducing recidivism and enhancing public safety which incorporate the following principles: Focus on the offenders most likely to recidivate; Use evidenced-based programs proven to work and ensure the delivery of services is high quality; Deploy supervision policies and practices that balance sanctions and treatment; and Target places where crime and recidivism rates are the highest. Civil legal services are an allowable use of grant funds: “Civil legal assistance can often play a critical role in addressing barriers to successful reintegration. An allowable use of Second Chance Act funds for juvenile reentry services includes referral to and payment of legal services related to the purpose of the grant, such as securing a driver’s license, expunging criminal records, litigating inappropriate denials of housing or employment and violations of the Fair Credit Reporting Act, creating and/or modifying child support orders, and other family law services that help stabilize individuals and families.”

Eligible Grantees: Eligible applicants are limited to a state correctional agency (the state department of corrections or department of community corrections), or the State Administering Agency (SAA). Grantees who have current Second Chance Act Recidivism Reduction grants may apply.

Prior Deadline: 6/28/2013

GrantSecond Chance Act Technology Careers Training Demonstration Projects for Incarcerated Adults and Juveniles

The Bureau of Justice Assistance seeks applications for funding to support the Second Chance Act Technology Careers Training Demonstration Projects for Incarcerated Adults and Juveniles. The goals of this program are to: 1) Increase the post-release employability of offenders in related technology based jobs and career fields; and 2) Establish and provide technology career training programs to train incarcerated adults and juveniles during the 3-year period before release from a prison, jail or juvenile facility.

Eligible Grantees: Applicants are limited to states, units of local government, territories, and federally recognized Indian tribes.

Prior Deadline: 3/17/2014

GrantSecond Chance Act Adult Mentoring and Transitional Services for Successful Reentry Program

The purpose of this program is to promote more effective and successful reentry for offenders through the establishment and maintenance of pre- and post-release mentoring relationships. Its objective is to recruit and train individuals as mentors and match them with participants in pre- and post-release services. Second Chance Act funds for reentry services includes referral to and payment of legal services related to the purpose of the grant such as: securing a driver's license, expunging criminal records, litigating inappropriate denials of housing or employment and violations of the Fair Credit Reporting Act, creating and/or modifying child support orders, and other family law services that help stabilize individuals and families.

Eligible Grantees: Eligible applicants are limited to a state correctional agency (the state department of corrections or department of community corrections), or the State Administering Agency (SAA). Grantees who have current Second Chance Act Recidivism Reduction grants may apply.

Prior Deadline: 6/28/2013

GrantJustice and Mental Health Collaboration Program

This program seeks to increase public safety through innovative cross-system collaboration for individuals with mental illnesses or co-occurring mental health and substance abuse disorders who come into contact with the justice system. BJA seeks applications that demonstrate a collaborative project between criminal justice and mental health partners to plan, implement, or expand a justice and mental health collaboration program. Grant funds may be used to: 1) Plan, create, or expand programs that promote public safety and public health by providing appropriate services for multisystem-involved individuals with mental illnesses or co-occurring mental health and substance abuse disorders; and 2) Promote and provide mental health and co-occurring disorders treatment and transitional services for those incarcerated or transitional reentry programs for those released from a correctional institution.

Eligible Grantees: States, units of local government, federally recognized Indian tribes and tribal organizations.

Prior Deadline: 3/25/2013

GrantTribal Law & Policy Institute

The Tribal Law and Policy Institute (TLPI) is a 100% Native American-owned and operated nonprofit organization that develops and delivers educational, research, training, and technical assistance programs that promote the enhancement of justice in Indian Country and the health, well-being, and culture of Native peoples. TLPI provides a wide array of training, technical assistance, and evaluation services for Tribal Healing to Wellness Courts through a grant from the Bureau of Justice Assistance.

Eligible Grantees: Tribal jurisdictions.

Prior Deadline: Ongoing

GrantSecond Chance Act Adult Offender Reentry Program for Planning and Demonstration Projects

The Second Chance Act provides a comprehensive response to the increasing number of incarcerated adults and juveniles who are released from prison, jail, and juvenile residential facilities and returning to communities. This program is designed to help communities develop and implement comprehensive and collaborative strategies that address the challenges posed by offender reentry and recidivism reduction. “Reentry” is not a specific program, but rather an evidence-based process that starts when an offender is initially incarcerated and ends when the offender has been successfully reintegrated in his or her community as a law-abiding citizen. The reentry process includes the delivery of a variety of evidence-based program services for every program participant in both a pre- and post-release setting. This process should provide the offender with appropriate evidence-based services—including addressing individual criminogenic needs—based on a reentry plan that relies on a risk/needs assessment that reflects the risk of recidivism for that offender.

Eligible Grantees: State and local government agencies and federally recognized Indian tribes.

Prior Deadline: 6/20/2013

GrantTribal Civil and Criminal Legal Assistance Grants, Training, and Technical Assistance

The TCCLA program helps enhance the opportunities of tribal justice systems and improves access to those systems. TCCLA provides grants to organizations to provide legal services in civil and criminal proceedings for indigent defendants and respondents in tribal justice systems. The goals of this program are to: 1) Enhance the operations of tribal justice systems and improve access to those systems, and 2) Provide training and technical assistance for development and enhancement of tribal justice systems. Related objectives are to provide quality technical and legal assistance and to encourage collaboration among grantees Indian tribes and the tribal justice community to enhance the provision of legal services in tribal justice systems.

Eligible Grantees: Category 1 & 2: Non-profit tribal and non-tribal organizations, including tribal enterprises and educational institutions (public, private, and tribal colleges and universities) that provide legal assistance services for federally recognized Indian tribes, or tribal justice systems. Category 3: National or regional membership organizations and associations whose membership or membership section consists of judicial system personnel within tribal justice systems.

Prior Deadline: 4/4/2013

Executive Office for Immigration Review (EOIR)

Information ResourceLegal Orientation Program (LOP)

The Executive Office for Immigration Review (EOIR), through its LOP, has been providing in-person orientations, self-help assistance, and pro bono referrals to individuals detained by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) since 2002. One of the LOP’s primary objectives is to provider group and individual orientations prior to a detainee’s first hearing before the immigration court. The group orientations provide an overview of the immigration court process and procedures as well as available legal options. The LOP also provides self-help workshops and written materials to self-represented detainees on specific forms of relief and discrete topics in immigration removal proceedings. Where pro bono representation resources are available, the LOP provides referrals and case placement with local pro bono attorneys. Using contracted non-profit legal service providers, the LOP currently operates in 36 of the largest or most actively utilized ICE detention facilities and 2 pilot programs at 2 non-detained immigration courts.

Information ResourceLegal Orientation Program for Custodians of Unaccompanied Minor Children (LOPC)

EOIR, through its LOPC, has been providing in-person orientations, self-help assistance, and pro bono referrals to custodians of unaccompanied minor children released from the custody of the Department of Health and Human Service’s Office of Refugee Resettlement since 2011. Similar to the LOP, the LOPC’s primary purpose is to provide group and individual orientations prior to unaccompanied minors’ first hearing before the immigration court. The LOPC also provides self-help workshops and screenings for pro bono case referral and placement. The LOPC uses contracted non-profit legal service providers to deliver LOPC services at 15 geographic areas across the country where most unaccompanied children released from Department of Health & Human Services custody are in removal proceedings before an immigration court. The LOPC also operates a national call center to serve those custodians who are not located near one of the 15 sites physically served by an LOPC contractor.

Information ResourceImmigration Court Helpdesk (ICH)

For Fiscal Year 2016, Congress provided EOIR with funding to create information helpdesks at the immigration courts with the largest pending caseloads. The primary goals of the ICH are to orient non-detained individuals appearing before the immigration court on the removal hearing process and to provide information to those individuals regarding possible remedies and legal resources. The ICH will provide in-person orientations, self-help assistance to unrepresented parties, and information on available pro bono resources to individuals without counsel. In early August 2016, EOIR launched the ICH at 5 immigration courts across the country.

Pilot Innovation Programs

GrantNational Qualified Representative Program (NQRP)

EOIR’s Office of Legal Access Programs (OLAP) has overseen the NQRP since 2014. The NQRP provides representation to unrepresented individuals detained by ICE who are found by an immigration judge to be mentally incompetent to represent themselves in immigration proceedings. When an immigration judge finds an individual mentally incompetent to represent him- or herself in immigration proceedings, the immigration judge orders the provision of legal representation to the individual.  Upon the immigration judge’s order, OLAP places the case with contracted counsel. EOIR contracts with non-profit legal services providers, federal public defender organizations, and private immigration law practices with experience working with mentally incompetent clients.  The NQRP is currently providing representation to respondents appearing in immigration courts in California, Arizona, Washington, Texas, Florida and Colorado, with plans to continue roll-out to other court locations nationwide in the future.

GrantBaltimore Representation Initiative for Unaccompanied Children

The Baltimore Representation Initiative for Unaccompanied Children (BRIUC) funds direct representation in immigration proceedings at the Baltimore Immigration Court for unaccompanied children who are under the age of 16 and whose cases are not joined with an adult’s (regardless of the child’s eligibility for immigration relief). Established in 2014, BRIUC aims to prevent mistreatment, exploitation, and trafficking of unaccompanied children.

GrantJustice AmeriCorps

EOIR funds and provides technical assistance on the justice AmeriCorps program, a complementary program overseen by the Corporation for National and Community Service. The justice AmeriCorps program provides direct representation through a grant model to certain unaccompanied minors in immigration removal proceedings before 20 immigration courts across the country. Through August 2016, justice AmeriCorps members have accepted 2,314 children’s cases.

Information ResourceBoard of Immigration Appeals (BIA) Pro Bono Project  

In 2001, EOIR and non-profit organizations partnered to develop the BIA Pro Bono Project, which identifies certain cases for placement with pro bono representatives. EOIR assists immigration legal service providers in identifying certain cases pending before the BIA that are appropriate for pro bono representation based upon pre-determined criteria. Once cases are identified and reviewed by private volunteer attorneys, their summaries are then distributed by a non-profit agency to pro bono representatives throughout the United States. Volunteers who accept a case under the Project receive a copy of the file, as well as additional time to file the appeal brief.

Information ResourceModel Hearing Program (MHP)

Through OLAP, EOIR facilitates the MHP, an educational program developed to improve the quality of advocacy before the court and to increase levels of pro bono representation. MHPs consist of small-scale “mock” trial training sessions held in immigration court. Partnering bar associations and pro bono organizations, provide practical and relevant “hands-on” immigration court training to small groups of attorneys and law students with an emphasis on practice, procedure and advocacy skills. Participants receive training materials, may obtain Continuing Legal Education credit from the partnering organization, and commit to providing some pro bono representation.

Information ResourceList of Pro Bono Legal Service Providers (Pro Bono List)

The Pro Bono List is provided to individuals in immigration proceedings. The Pro Bono List is central to EOIR’s efforts to improve the amount and quality of representation before its immigration judges, and it is an essential tool to inform individuals in proceedings before EOIR of available pro bono legal services. OLAP administers the Pro Bono List and publishes it quarterly in January, April, July, and October. The Pro Bono List contains information on non-profit organizations and attorneys who have committed to providing at least 50 hours per year of pro bono legal services before the immigration court location(s) where they appear on the Pro Bono List. The Pro Bono List also contains information on pro bono referral services that refer individuals in immigration court proceedings to pro bono counsel.

OFFICE OF JUVENILE JUSTICE AND DELINQUENCY PREVENTION (OJJDP)

GrantSmart on Juvenile Justice: Enhancing Youth Access to Justice State Reform Initiative

The purpose of this program is to fund efforts that reduce recidivism and ensure that children receive the guarantees of due process and equal protection by improving the quality of indigent defense services in the United States.  Under Category One of this Fiscal Year 2015 initiative, OJJDP competitively awarded four states – Delaware, Indiana, Kentucky, and Washington –planning grants to develop statewide juvenile defense reform strategic plans with standards of practice and policies for the management of those systems. 

The National Juvenile Defender Center (NJDC), a training and technical assistance (TTA) provider, was competitively selected under Category Two of the Initiative to assist the planning states to assess their current juvenile defense delivery systems and develop their strategic plans for system-wide reform.  Also under this award, NJDC hired, trained, and placed Reentry Legal Fellows in four locales – Baltimore, MD, Columbia, SC, Lincoln, NE, Martinez, CA, and St. Louis County, MO – to help youth, through direct civil legal services, community partnerships, and special projects, to address collateral consequences of justice-system involvement and successfully transition back into society and their communities. 

Under Category Three of this Initiative, Georgetown University and the Colorado Juvenile Defender Center (CJDC) were each competitively funded to operate regional juvenile defender resource centers.  Georgetown’s center serves Maryland, Virginia, West Virginia, D.C., and Puerto Rico, and CJDC’s center serves Colorado, Utah, Arizona, Texas, Oklahoma, and New Mexico.

Eligible Grantees: Category 1: Youth Access to Justice State Reform Planning Grants applicants were limited to states (including territories and the District of Columbia) and federally recognized tribal governments (as determined by the Secretary of the Interior).  Category 2: Youth Access to Justice Training and Technical Assistance applicants were limited to nonprofit and for-profit organizations (including tribal nonprofit and for-profit organizations) and institutions of higher education (including tribal institutions of higher education).  For-profit organizations were required to forgo any profit or management fee.  Category 3: Youth Access to Justice State and Tribal Juvenile Defender Resource Center applicants were limited to nonprofit and for-profit organizations (including tribal nonprofit and for-profit organizations) and institutions of higher education (including tribal institutions of higher education).  For-profit organizations were required to forgo any profit or management fee.

Prior Deadline: 6/25/15

GrantSmart on Juvenile Justice: Enhancing Youth Access to Justice State Reform Implementation Program

The purpose of this program is to fund efforts that reduce recidivism and ensure that children receive the guarantees of due process and equal protection.  Under the Fiscal Year 2016 Enhancing Youth Access to Justice State Reform Implementation Program, OJJDP anticipates competitively selecting two states to receive implementation grants to operationalize statewide juvenile defense reform strategic plans with standards of practice and policies for the management of those systems.

Eligible Grantees: Eligibility was limited to the four recipients of OJJDP’s Fiscal Year 2015 Enhancing Youth Access to Justice Initiative: Category One State Reform Planning Grants (Delaware Criminal Justice Council, Indiana Public Defender Council, Kentucky Department of Public Advocacy, and Washington State Office of Public Defense).

Prior Deadline: 7/5/16

GrantSecond Chance Act Juvenile Reentry (Legal) Assistance Program

In Fiscal Year 2015, funded under the Second Chance Act, OJJDP established a formal interagency partnership with the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and transferred $1.75M to HUD.  The purpose was to fund a series of Juvenile Reentry Assistance Program (JRAP) demonstration projects across the country to support young people’s successful transition back to their families and communities, following confinement, by helping them to overcome an array of collateral consequences of justice-system involvement through direct legal services to the youth.  HUD awarded eighteen JRAP grants to public housing authorities in partnership with legal aid providers around the country.  Available legal services include records expungement and sealing, and actions to eliminate barriers to employment, housing, and education.

Eligible Grantees: Not-for-profit legal services providers in partnership with public housing authorities.

Prior Deadline: 1/4/2016

GrantJuvenile Indigent Defense National Clearinghouse

The purpose of this program is to improve indigent defense representation and the overall level of systemic advocacy nationally.  In Fiscal Year 2013, the National Juvenile Defender Center (NJDC) was competitively awarded a cooperative agreement to provide the juvenile defense bar with ongoing training, technical support, capacity-building assistance, tools, resources, and leadership opportunities.  The program received continuation funding through Fiscal Year 2015.

Eligible Grantees: Nonprofit and for-profit organizations (including tribal nonprofit and for-profit organizations), and institutions of higher education (including tribal institutions of higher education).

Prior Deadline: 5/15/2013

OFFICE ON VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN (OVW)

GrantLegal Assistance for Victims Grant Program

The Legal Assistance for Victims (LAV) Grant Program is intended to increase the availability of civil and criminal legal assistance needed to effectively aid adult and youth victims of sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking who are seeking relief in legal matters relating to or arising out of that abuse or violence, at minimum or no cost to the victims. The objective of the LAV Grant Program is to develop innovative, collaborative projects that provide quality representation to victims of sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking.

Eligible Grantees: Eligible entities for this program are: Private nonprofit entities; Publicly funded organizations not acting in a governmental capacity, such as law schools; Territorial organizations; Indian tribal governments; Indian tribal organizations; or Indian tribal consortia.

Prior Deadline: 3/11/2015

GrantEnhanced Training and Services to End Violence against and Abuse of Women Later in Life Program

This grant funds projects that will support a comprehensive approach to addressing elder abuse in their communities. These projects will provide training to criminal justice professionals to enhance their ability to address elder abuse, neglect and exploitation in their communities; provide cross training opportunities to professionals working with older victims; establish or support a coordinated community response to elder abuse; and provide or enhance services for victims who are 50 years of age or older.
Eligible Grantees: Applicants are limited to states, units of local government, tribal governments or tribal organizations, population specific organizations with demonstrated experience in assisting individuals over 50 years of age, victim service providers with demonstrated experience in addressing domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking, and state, tribal, or territorial domestic violence or sexual assault coalitions.
Prior Deadline: 3/18/2015