Information for Victims in Large Cases

Displaying 1 - 10 of 11
Case Name Familiar Names and Terms District or Division Overview
Elliot Phillip Rosenberg, Costa Rica, sweepstakes Criminal Division

According to the indictment, beginning in or about 2010, Elliot Phillip Rosenberg owned and managed one or more call centers in Costa Rica engaged in a sweepstakes scheme directed at individuals residing in the United States. Rosenberg and his co-conspirators fraudulently induced victims to pay thousands of dollars by falsely representing that the victims had won valuable prizes. Rosenberg and his co-conspirators continued to call and insist that additional payments be made for new fees until an individual either ran out of money or discovered the fraudulent nature of the scheme.

TierOne, Gilbert Lundstrom Criminal Division

Gilbert G. Lundstrom was the CEO of TierOne Bank from 1999 to January 2010. According to allegations in the indictment, he and others concealed the true value of TierOne’s loan and real estate portfolio. They also provided falsely inflated figures in their reporting to the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) and the Office of Thrift Supervision (OTS). Specifically, Lundstrom and others allegedly used outdated property appraisals and rejected new appraisals that would have required TierOne to mark down the value of its real estate holdings. In addition, Lundstrom and others allegedly delayed seeking new appraisals to conceal the depreciating value of its loan collateral, and restructured loan terms to disguise the borrowers’ inability to make timely interest and principal payments. As a result, Lundstrom and others were allegedly able to hide millions of dollars in losses from regulators and investors.

TierOne, James A. Laphen Criminal Division According to court documents, James Laphen and others concealed the true value of TierOne’s loan and real estate portfolio and provided falsely inflated figures in its required reports to the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) and the Office of Thrift Supervision (OTS).  Specifically, Laphen admitted that he used outdated property appraisals and rejected new appraisals that would have required TierOne to mark down the value of its real estate holdings. In addition, Laphen admitted that he and others delayed seeking new appraisals to conceal the depreciating value of its loan collateral, and restructured loan terms to disguise the borrowers’ inability to make timely interest and principal payments. As a result, Laphen admitted that he and others were able to hide millions of dollars in losses from regulators and investors.
TierOne, Don A. Langford Criminal Division

According to court documents, Don Langford and others concealed the true value of TierOne’s loan and real estate portfolio and provided falsely inflated figures in its required reports to the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) and the Office of Thrift Supervision (OTS).  Specifically, Don Langford admitted that he used outdated property appraisals and rejected new appraisals that would have required TierOne to mark down the value of its real estate holdings. In addition, Langford admitted that he and others delayed seeking new appraisals to conceal the depreciating value of its loan collateral, and restructured loan terms to disguise the borrowers’ inability to make timely interest and principal payments. As a result, Langford admitted that he and others were able to hide millions of dollars in losses from regulators and investors.

Harold Bailey Gallison II, Ann Hiskey, Michael Randles, Roger Coleman, Carl Kruse Sr., Carl Kruse Jr., Frank Zangara, Mark Dresner, Charles Moeller, Warrior Girl Corp., WRGL, Everock Inc., EVRN Criminal Division The indictment alleges that the defendants artificially “pumped” or inflated the trading volume and price of the securities by touting business activities and deceptive revenue forecasts, and by engaging in coordinated trading activity to create the appearance of increasing market demand. The defendants then allegedly “dumped” or sold the securities at the inflated prices and laundered the proceeds from their scheme through bank accounts in the United States and overseas.
Anthony B. Brandel, Joseph Micelli, James Warras, Sean Finn, Martin Schlaepfer, Hans-Jurg Lips, Malom Group AG Criminal Division

Between approximately October 2009 through October 2013, the defendants used a Swiss corporation known as Malom Group AG to promote investments in European equities and debt offerings, which they said would yield high rates of return. The indictment alleges that the defendants created and provided to investors fake bank statements representing that Malom Group AG had large deposit balances at prominent European banks. The defendants collected payments of between $200,000 and $1.2 million per investor but did not put the funds toward the advertised investments. Instead, the defendants used the money for their own purposes.

Jeffrey Robert Bonner, Nicholas Dover, Keith Forbes, Michael Forbes, Michael Miller, Ashley Clark and William Forbes, Cody Trevor Burgsteiner, Clinton Barnes, Everette Jones, Darra Lee Shephard, Nora Southerland, Donna Ramirez, sweepstakes, Costa Rica Criminal Division

Jeffrey Robert Bonner owned and operated “call centers”, located in San Jose, Costa Rica, which he and his co-defendants used to defraud United States residents, typically over the age of 55, by deceiving them into believing that they had won prizes in a “sweepstakes contest.” The indictment alleges that Jeffrey Robert Bonner, Cody Trevor Burgsteiner, Darra Lee Shephard, and their co-conspirators made calls to victims from Costa Rica. Victims were informed that to receive their “prize,” they were to wire, via Western Union, thousands of dollars for a purported “refundable insurance fee” to a so-called “insurance entity” in Costa Rica. When victims questioned the legitimacy of the operation, they were given phone numbers purportedly to United States government agents who falsely reassured the victims that they had, in fact, won a sweepstakes prize. The co-conspirators then allegedly continued to solicit victims to send more money until their victims’ funds were depleted.

Smoke Shop and Accessories, Emily Obozokhae Criminal Division

From February 2005 through October 2007, the defendant operated Smoke Shop and Accessories which conducted money transfer transactions. Counterfeit checks were mailed to individuals who were advised to cash and wire a portion of the proceeds to a third party. The wired monies were then intercepted and used for the defendant’s personal use.

Jeffrey Skilling, Enron, Kenneth Lay Criminal Division Skilling and other Enron executives engaged in a scheme to deceive the investing public, the SEC and others about the true performance of Enron’s businesses. The scheme was designed to make it appear that Enron was growing at a healthy and predictable rate, that Enron was comprised of a number of successful business units, and that the company had an appropriate cash flow. It had the effect of inflating artificially Enron’s stock price, and artificially stemming the decline of the stock during the first three quarters of 2001. The fraud scheme eventually unraveled and Enron filed for bankruptcy in December 2001, making its stock virtually worthless.
Robert Allen Stanford, Stanford International Bank, Stanford Financial Group, SIB, Laura Pendergest-Holt, Gilbert Lopez, Mark Kuhrt, Leroy King Criminal Division R. Allen Stanford, the former board of directors’ chairman of Stanford International Bank (SIB), was convicted by a federal jury of orchestrating a 20-year investment fraud scheme in which he misappropriated $7 billion from SIB to finance his personal businesses.

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