The Community Relations Service Updates Its Website

October 7, 2019

The Department of Justice Community Relations Service (CRS) has updated its website www.justice.gov/crs. The website contains new features, improved navigability, and additional resources to help visitors learn about CRS programs and services that can help them address conflict, tensions, and hate crimes in their communities. These updates include:

 

  • A new home page which provides easier access to resources and information about CRS
  • More user-friendly links and icons to improve navigation throughout the site
  • New dedicated pages highlighting each of CRS’s services: facilitation, mediation, training, and consultation
  • A reorganized Resource Center page, which helps visitors find what they need more quickly
  • Updated content, tailored resources, and case examples describing CRS’s work in the jurisdictional areas of race, color, national origin, religion, gender, gender identity, sexual orientation, and disability
  • Updated information on our work with stakeholders including community groups, law enforcement, civil rights groups, government agencies, tribal communities, religious groups, and educational organizations

 

We encourage you to visit the site. And, as always, CRS welcomes your feedback, which can be sent to askcrs@usdoj.gov.

 

CRS serves as “America’s Peacemaker” for communities facing conflict and hate crimes based on actual or perceived race, color, national origin, gender, gender identity, sexual orientation, religion, or disability. CRS works toward its mission by providing facilitated dialogue, mediation, training, and consultation services to help these communities come together, develop solutions, and enhance their capacity to independently prevent and resolve future conflict.

 

All CRS services are confidential and provided on a voluntary basis, free of charge to the communities. CRS is not an investigative or prosecutorial agency and does not have any law enforcement authority. CRS works with all parties to develop solutions to conflict and serves as a neutral party.

 

Related blog posts

Updated October 7, 2019