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Justice News

Department of Justice
U.S. Attorney’s Office
Eastern District of Michigan

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday, March 14, 2018

Former Detroit Police Officer Sentenced to 24 Months in Prison for Extortion

Former Detroit Police Department Officer Anthony Careathers was sentenced today to twenty-four months’ imprisonment for accepting a bribe from an owner of an automobile collision shop in exchange for referring stolen and abandoned vehicles recovered in the City of Detroit to that shop, United States Attorney Matthew Schneider announced today.

Schneider was joined in the announcement by Jeffrey E. Peterson, Acting Special Agent in Charge, Federal Bureau of Investigation, Patricia Armstrong, U.S. Postal Inspector in Charge, U.S. Postal Inspection Service, Detroit Division and Chief James Craig, Detroit Police Department. The defendant was actively employed with the Detroit Police Department at the time of the offense.

Anthony Careathers, age 52, was sentenced by U.S. District Judge Robert Cleland. Careathers previously pleaded guilty to one count of extortion.

According to the facts alleged in the indictment and further developed at the plea hearing and in sentencing briefing, Careathers accepted cash payments from the owner/operator of a Detroit collision shop in exchange for referring abandoned vehicles to that shop for repairs and for warning the business owner of law enforcement activity.

This is the first defendant to have been sentenced as a result of this investigation.  The others awaiting sentencing or a trial are:

  • James Robertson, age 45, pleaded guilty to an Information charging 2 counts of Extortion
  • Jamil Martin, 46, pleaded Guilty to an Information charging 1 count of Extortion
  • Martin Tutt, age 29, pleaded guilty to an Information charging 2 counts of Extortion
  • Charles Wills, age 52, pleaded guilty to two counts of Extortion charged in a Superseding Indictment.
  • Deonne Dotson, age 45, is awaiting trial.

 

All of the Officers were charged with engaging in extortion for using their official positions as Police Officers to refer cars to certain collision shops in exchange for cash payments.

“The vast majority of Detroit Police Officers are courageous, dedicated public servants, but unfortunately these defendants are an exception to that rule,” U.S. Attorney Schneider said.

"I certainly appreciate the collaborative partnership of the state and federal agencies who took part in conducting this investigation." said Chief James Craig. "Although, the actions of these officers are disappointing, I echo U.S. Attorney Matthew Schneider in saying that the vast majority of the men and women on this department, serve the residents of this city with the utmost level of integrity and dedication."

“Anthony Careathers, a former Detroit Police Officer, was held accountable today for his own individual actions.  Careathers' acts should not be considered representative of the vast majority of law enforcement professionals at the Detroit Police Department who serve the citizens of Detroit with honor and integrity every day," said Jeffery E. Peterson, Acting Special Agent in Charge, Detroit Division of the FBI.

The investigation was conducted by the FBI, the U.S. Postal Inspection Service, Detroit Police Department and the following agencies from the FBI Detroit Area Corruption Task Force: Michigan State Police and U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Office of Professional Responsibility, Investigative Operation Division.

The FBI Detroit Area Corruption Task Force is comprised of personnel from the Detroit Division of the FBI; Michigan State Police; Michigan Department of Attorney General; Detroit Police Department; U.S. Internal Revenue Service, Criminal Investigation Division; U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Office of Professional Responsibility, Investigative Operations Division; U.S. Postal Inspection Service; U.S. Department of Labor, Office of the Inspector General, Office of Labor Racketeering and

Fraud Investigations; U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, Office of the Inspector General; U.S. Department of Transportation, Office of the Inspector General; U.S. Department of Homeland Security, Office of the Inspector General; U.S. Department of Education, Office of the Inspector General; and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of the Inspector General.

The case is being prosecuted by Assistant United States Attorneys Sarah Resnick Cohen and Craig A. Weier.

Topic(s): 
Public Corruption
Updated March 14, 2018