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Justice News

Department of Justice
U.S. Attorney’s Office
District of Massachusetts

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday, August 27, 2018

Douglas Man Sentenced to 11 Years in Federal Prison for Possessing Child Pornography

Defendant previously convicted of rape of a child; possessed thousands of images of girls between four-and-eight-years-old

BOSTON - A Douglas man was sentenced in federal court in Worcester on Friday, Aug. 24, 2018, for possession of child pornography. 

Bryan Larson, 46, was sentenced by U.S. District Court Judge Timothy S. Hillman to 11 years in prison and five years of supervised release. In November 2017, Larson pleaded guilty to possession of child pornography.

A search of Larson’s home in June 2015 resulted in the recovery of thousands of images of child pornography on his computer. The images and videos primarily depicted girls aged 4-8 engaged in sexual acts - including oral, anal and vaginal sex - with adult men. Approximately 4,000 of the images contained known victims, and many of those victims submitted impact statements for the Court to consider at sentencing. Larson was previously convicted of three counts of rape of a child in 1995.

United States Attorney Andrew E. Lelling; Peter C. Fitzhugh, Special Agent in Charge of Homeland Security Investigations in Boston; Harold H. Shaw, Special Agent in Charge of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Boston Field Division; Colonel Kerry A. Gilpin, Superintendent of the Massachusetts State Police; and Douglas Police Chief Nick Miglionico made the announcement. Assistant U.S. Attorney Karin M. Bell, Deputy Chief of Lelling’s Criminal Division, prosecuted the case.

This case was brought as part of Project Safe Childhood, a nationwide initiative to combat the growing epidemic of child sexual exploitation and abuse, launched in May 2006 by the Department of Justice.  Led by U.S. Attorneys’ offices and CEOS, Project Safe Childhood marshals federal, state and local resources to locate, apprehend and prosecute individuals who exploit children via the Internet, as well as to identify and rescue victims. For more information about Project Safe Childhood, please visit www.projectsafechildhood.gov.

Topic(s): 
Project Safe Childhood
Component(s): 
Updated August 27, 2018