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Justice News

Department of Justice
U.S. Attorney’s Office
Middle District of Florida

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday, April 25, 2016

Middle District Of Florida Joins Nationwide Efforts To Reduce Recidivism During National Reentry Week

Tampa, FL – As part of the Department of Justice’s commitment to strengthening the criminal justice system, the week of April 24-30, 2016, has been designated as National Reentry Week.  Today, U.S. Attorney A. Lee Bentley, III announces his office’s participation in several initiatives that strive to help those who have paid their debt to society prepare for substantive opportunities beyond the prison gates, promote family unity, contribute to the health of our economy, advance public safety, and sustain the strength of our communities. For information on specific events taking place in the District throughout the week, visit the MDFL Reentry webpage.

“I am proud of the reentry work that we are doing with our partners throughout the District,” stated U.S. Attorney A. Lee Bentley, III. “Our collective efforts have resulted in positive transformations in the lives of many returning from prison, benefitting not only the ex-offenders, but also their families and our communities.  Our approach has proven to be a worthwhile investment, reducing crime and recidivism in the Middle District of Florida. We remain committed to working with our partners in this endeavor of reformation, restoration, and hope.”   

Each year, more than 600,000 citizens return to our neighborhoods after serving time in federal and state prisons. Another 11.4 million individuals cycle through local jails. And nearly one in three Americans of working age have had some sort of encounter with the criminal justice system — mostly for relatively minor, non-violent offenses, and sometimes from decades in the past.  The long-term impact of a criminal record prevents many people from obtaining employment, housing, higher education, and credit — and these barriers affect returning individuals even if they have turned their lives around and are unlikely to reoffend. 

Earlier today, U.S. Attorney General Loretta Lynch released the “Roadmap to Reentry: The Justice Department’s Vision to Reduce Recidivism through Federal Reentry Reform. The principles outlined in the document are aligned with the work of the Federal Interagency Reentry Council, which has been working since its creation five years ago to reduce recidivism and improve employment, education, housing, health, and child welfare outcomes.

National Reentry Week events are being planned in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands.  U.S. Attorney’s Offices alone are hosting over 200 events and BOP facilities are holding over 370 events.

Topic(s): 
Community Outreach
Component(s): 
Updated April 25, 2016