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Justice News

Department of Justice
U.S. Attorney’s Office
Northern District of Georgia

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday, August 1, 2018

Former Auburn, Georgia police officer sentenced for extortion and robbery

ATLANTA - Charles Hubbard, a former police officer with the Auburn, Georgia Police Department, has been sentenced to federal prison for his role relating to conspiracies to commit extortion, traffic drugs, and commit robbery. Co-defendants, Shane J. Mattadeen, Wilfred Rivera, Michael L. Henley, Jr., Shaeib H. Morgan, Clem C. Williamson, and Martin Rosendary, were also charged in the scheme.

“Instead of enforcing the laws he swore to uphold, Hubbard abused his positon as a law enforcement officer by stealing from drug traffickers for his own financial gain,” said U.S. Attorney Byung J. “BJay” Pak.  “We are grateful for our law enforcement partners who worked tirelessly to bring Hubbard and his co-conspirators to justice.”

“The overwhelming majority of police officers perform their duties with honor and professionalism,” said Daniel R. Salter, the Executive Director of the Atlanta-Carolinas High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area (HIDTA). “This defendant abused his position of trust by robbing drug dealers and now he must spend well-deserved time in prison for his criminal acts. This case would not have been possible without the dedicated cooperation between HIDTA, DEA, its law enforcement partners and the subsequent prosecution by the U.S. Attorney’s Office.” 

“The public places trust in law enforcement officials and expects for officers to protect and serve them,” said Robert J. Murphy, the Special Agent in Charge of the DEA Atlanta Field Division. “When an officer violates his oath, this trust is eroded. The defendant in this case unfortunately does not fairly reflect the honest and hardworking men and women of law enforcement who put their lives on the line daily to protect its citizens. This case is a reminder that no officer is above the law. It is also a great example of what can be achieved when DEA works hand-in-hand with its law enforcement counterparts and the U.S. Attorney’s Office.”

According to U. S. Attorney Pak, the indictment, and other information presented in court:  From 2009 until 2016, Hubbard partnered with at least six other people to identify, extort and rob drug dealers.  After a several months’ long investigation, the planning for their latest exploit started on March 30, 2016, when a confidential source approached co-defendant Morgan with a plan to steal money from purported drug dealers who were going to give the confidential source $60,000 for a kilogram of heroin.  The confidential source proposed that Morgan elicit Hubbard’s help, a sworn police officer with the Auburn, Georgia, Police Department, to conduct a fake traffic stop of the source and seize the money for the participants to split.  That same day, Morgan presented the plan to Rosendary who, in turn, presented it to Hubbard.  Hubbard agreed to participate in the robbery and extortion plan.

On April 4, 2016, DEA agents gave the confidential source $40,000.  The source drove to an apartment complex where Hubbard, wearing a tactical police vest and police badge, approached the source and took the money.  Hubbard, Rosendary, and Morgan met briefly, divided the money, and departed.  DEA agents then arrested all three, but not before Rosendary led the agents on a high-speed chase which ended after Rosendary lost control of his vehicle.  Morgan, who was the passenger in the vehicle, fled on foot and was tracked down by a canine.  When the dog found him, Morgan had $10,000 in his pants and another $10,000 nearby.  Hubbard was found with $20,000 in his vehicle.

Charles Hubbard, 54, of Loganville, Georgia was sentenced to nine years in prison to be followed by three years of supervised release on July 30, 2018.  Hubbard pleaded guilty to conspiracy to obtain property by extortion under color of official right and conspiracy to possess cocaine with the intent to distribute on August 17, 2016. 

The other defendants pleaded guilty as follows:

●Martin Rosendary, 47, of Atlanta, Georgia pleaded guilty to conspiracy to obtain property by extortion under color of official right, conspiracy to possess cocaine with the intent to distribute, and conspiracy to commit robbery by force on September 2, 2016.  Rosendary is scheduled to be sentenced on August 15, 2018. 

 ●Shane J. Mattadeen, 41, of Lilburn, Georgia, pleaded guilty to conspiracy to obtain property by extortion under color of official right and conspiracy to possess cocaine with the intent to distribute on February 12, 2018. Mattadeen was sentenced to eight years in prison to be followed by five years of supervised release on July 10, 2018.

●Wilfred Rivera, 38, of Sugar Hill, Georgia pleaded guilty to conspiracy to obtain property by extortion under color of official right and conspiracy to possess cocaine with the intent to distribute on March 5, 2018.  Rivera was sentenced to seven years, eight months in prison to be followed by three years of supervised release on June 4, 2018. 

●Michael L. Henley, Jr., 32, of Alpharetta, Georgia, pleaded guilty to conspiracy to commit robbery by force on February 26, 2018.  Henley was sentenced to six years, three months in prison to be followed by three years of supervised release on June 7, 2018. 

●Shaeib H. Morgan, 42, of Stone Mountain, Georgia pleaded guilty to conspiracy to obtain property by extortion under color of official right and distribution of heroin on August 18, 2016.  Morgan was sentenced to three years, 10 months in prison to be followed by three years of supervised release on May 28, 2018. 

●Clem C. Williamson, 43, of Lawrenceville, Georgia, pleaded guilty to conspiracy to obtain property by extortion under color of official right and conspiracy to possess cocaine with the intent to distribute on August 29, 2017.  Williamson was sentenced to one year, six months in prison to be followed by three years of supervised release on April 24, 2018. 

This case was investigated by the Atlanta-Carolinas High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area Program, and the Drug Enforcement Administration, with assistance from the Georgia State Patrol and the Federal Bureau of Investigation.

Assistant U.S. Attorney Elizabeth M. Hathaway, Chief of the Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs Section, and Special Assistant U.S. Attorney Tyler A. Mann prosecuted the case.

For further information please contact the U.S. Attorney’s Public Affairs Office at USAGAN.PressEmails@usdoj.gov or (404) 581-6016.  The Internet address for the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Northern District of Georgia is http://www.justice.gov/usao-ndga.

Topic(s): 
Drug Trafficking
Public Corruption
Updated August 1, 2018