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9-65.000
PROTECTION OF GOVERNMENT OFFICIALS

9-65.100 Protection of the President, Presidential Staff, and Certain Secret Service Protectees
9-65.110 Protection of the President and Secret Service Protectees—Notification Requirement
9-65.140 Publicity Concerning Threats Against Government Officials
9-65.200 Threats Against the President and Successors to the Presidency; Threats Against Former Presidents; and Certain Other Secret Service Protectees
9-65.300 Presidential Assassination Statute—18 U.S.C. § 1751
9-65.400 Protection of Temporary Residences and Offices of the President and Other Secret Service Protectees (18 U.S.C. § 1752)
9-65.402 Presidential Visit—United States Attorney's Responsibility
9-65.463 Competency—Utilization of Federal Facility
9-65.500 Interference with or Obstruction of the Secret Service—18 U.S.C. § 3056(d)
9-65.600 Assaults on and Kidnapping of Federal Officers
9-65.611 General Prosecutive Policy Under 18 U.S.C. § 111
9-65.700 Congressional, Cabinet, and Supreme Court Assassination, Kidnapping, and Assault (18 U.S.C. § 351)
9-65.800 Protection of Foreign Officials, Internationally Protected Persons (IPPs) and Official Guests
9-65.810 Prosecutive Policy—Preference for Local Disposition
9-65.811 Authority to Initiate Prosecution
9-65.880 Demonstrations
9-65.881 Demonstrations—Procedures
9-65.882 Demonstrations—Investigative Decisions by United States Attorneys
9-65.900 Protection of a Member of a Federal Official's Family (18 U.S.C. § 115)

9-65.100

Protection of the President, Presidential Staff, and Certain Secret Service Protectees

The primary statutes relevant to protection of the President and other Secret Service protectees are as follows: 18 U.S.C. §§ 871, 879, 1751, 1752, and 3056(d). Other relevant statutes include: 18 U.S.C. §§ 115, 351, and 2332b. Supervisory authority over 18 U.S.C. §§ 871, 879, 1751, and 3056(d) rests with the Counterterrorism Section (CTS) of the National Security Division. Authority over 18 U.S.C. § 1752 rests with the Office of Enforcement Operations of the Criminal Division. For a discussion of the investigative jurisdiction, see the Criminal Resource Manual at 1526 (investigative jurisdiction generally) and 1527 (Agreement Between the FBI and the Secret Service).

A general discussion of statutes relating to the protection of the President is in the Criminal Resource Manual at 1525.

[cited in Criminal Resource Manual 6]

9-65.110

Protection of the President and Secret Service Protectees—Notification Requirement

CTS should be telephonically notified immediately upon the initiation of any investigation under 18 U.S.C. § 1751. In determining whether a Presidential or Vice-Presidential staff member is a protected person for purposes of determining whether a violation of § 1751(a)(2) has occurred, CTS should be contacted to verify whether the person was appointed under section 105(a)(2)(A) of Title 3, United States Code.

[updated May 2012]

9-65.140

Publicity Concerning Threats Against Government Officials

Media attention given to certain kinds of criminal activity seems to generate further criminal activity; this is especially true concerning Presidential threats which is well documented by data previously supplied by the United States Secret Service. For example, in the six-month period following the March 30, 1981, attempt on the life of President Reagan, the average number of threats against protectees of the Secret Service increased by over 150 percent from a similar period during the prior year.

Of the individuals who come to the Secret Service's attention as creating a possible danger to one of their protectees, approximately 75 percent are mentally ill. The Secret Service is particularly concerned that media attention given to cases involving threats against protectees may provoke violent acts from such mentally unstable persons.

The United States Attorney must carefully consider the possible adverse effect before releasing information to the public concerning cases and matters involving threats against the President (18 U.S.C. § 871) as well as other Secret Service protectees (18 U.S.C. § 879). This exercise of caution should extend to secondary sources of press information as well (search warrants, affidavits, etc.), and the use of tools such as sealed affidavits should be considered.

See also Media Guidelines, USAM 1-7.000 et seq., and 28 C.F.R. § 50.2.

9-65.200

Threats Against the President and Successors to the Presidency; Threats Against Former Presidents; and Certain Other Secret Service Protectees

The Counterterrorism Section of the National Security Division has supervisory authority over 18 U.S.C. §§ 871 and 879 cases. As great caution must be taken in matters relating to the security of the persons protected by 18 U.S.C. § 871, United States Attorneys are encouraged to consult with the Counterterrorism Section (CTS) of the National Security Division when they have doubts on the prosecutive merit of a case. For the same reason, dismissal of complaints under 18 U.S.C. § 871, when the defendant is in custody under the Mental Incompetency Statutes (18 U.S.C. §§ 4244, 4246), requires approval from CTS. In other cases, United States Attorneys must consult prior to dismissing a count involving, or entering into any sentence commitment or other case settlement involving a § 871 charge.

See the following sections of the Criminal Resource Manual for a discussion of case and other law defining "threat"

Against the President and Successors to the Presidency Criminal Resource Manual at 1528
Against Former Presidents and Certain Other Secret Service Protectees Criminal Resource Manual at 1529
Intent to Carry Out Threat—Secret Service Protectees Criminal Resource Manual at 1530
Conditional Threat—Secret Service Protectees Criminal Resource Manual at 1531
Against Former Presidents, and Certain Other Secret Service Protectees Criminal Resource Manual at 1532
[updated May 2012]

9-65.300

Presidential Assassination Statute—18 U.S.C. § 1751

Title 18 U.S.C. § 1751 makes it a federal offense for anyone to assault, kill or kidnap, or attempt or conspire to kill or kidnap the President and Vice President of the United States, among others. The Counterterrorism Section of the National Security Division has supervisory authority over matters involving section 1751.

See the following sections of the Criminal Resource Manual for additional materials relating to the Presidential Assassination Statute

Presidential Assassination Statute—18 U.S.C. § 1751— Constitutionality Criminal Resource Manual at 1533
Investigative Responsibility— 18 U.S.C. § 1751(i) Criminal Resource Manual at 1534
Killing the President— 18 U.S.C. § 1751(a) Criminal Resource Manual at 1535
Murder—Definition and Degrees Criminal Resource Manual at 1536
Manslaughter Defined Criminal Resource Manual at 1537
Kidnapping the President— 18 U.S.C. § 1751(b) Criminal Resource Manual at 1538
Elements—Kidnapping the President— 18 U.S.C. § 1751(b) Criminal Resource Manual at 1539
Attempting to Kill or Kidnap the President— 18 U.S.C. § 1751 Criminal Resource Manual at 1540
Conspiracy to Kill or Kidnap the President— 18 U.S.C. § 1751 Criminal Resource Manual at 1541
Assault— 18 U.S.C. § 1751(e) Criminal Resource Manual at 1542
Definitions— 18 U.S.C. § 1751(f) Criminal Resource Manual at 1543
Rewards— 18 U.S.C. § 1751(g) Criminal Resource Manual at 1544
Suspension of State and Local Jurisdiction— 18 U.S.C. § 1751(h) Criminal Resource Manual at 1545
[updated May 2012] [cited in Criminal Resource Manual 6]

9-65.400

Protection of Temporary Residences and Offices of the President and Other Secret Service Protectees (18 U.S.C. § 1752)

The Secret Service will conduct investigations of alleged violations of Title 18 U.S.C. § 1752 and forward copies of all investigative reports to the United States Attorney and to the Criminal Division. The Office of Enforcement Operations, Criminal Division, has supervisory responsibility for Title 18 U.S.C. § 1752. Inquiries regarding violations of that statute, which violations generally take the form of trespass-like conduct, should be directed to the Office of Enforcement Operations, while inquiries regarding actual or intended violent conduct or acts of terrorism should be directed to the Counterterrorism Section, National Security Division. In particular, the Counterterrorism Section has supervisory responsibility for violent crimes against the President or other Secret Service protectees, and over acts of terrorism directed at temporary residences and offices of the President or other protectees; such conduct may constitute violations of § 1752 in addition to the applicable federal felony statutes.

For additional information relating to § 1752, see the following sections of the Criminal Resource Manual:

Protection of Temporary Residences and Offices of the President and Other Secret Service Protectees—18 U.S.C. § 1752 Criminal Resource Manual at 1546
Constitutionality—18 U.S.C. § 1752 Criminal Resource Manual at 1547
Designation of Protected Premises—18 U.S.C. § 1752 Criminal Resource Manual at 1548
Penalties, Venue, Effect on Other Laws—18 U.S.C. § 1752 Criminal Resource Manual at 1549
Local Law Enforcement—18 U.S.C. § 1752 Criminal Resource Manual at 1550
Sectional Analysis—18 U.S.C. § 1752 Criminal Resource Manual at 1551
Other Elements—18 U.S.C. § 1752 Criminal Resource Manual at 1552
Designated Temporary Residences or Offices—18 U.S.C. § 1752 Criminal Resource Manual at 1553
Restricted Areas—18 U.S.C. § 1752 Criminal Resource Manual at 1554
Disruption of Government Business—18 U.S.C. § 1752 Criminal Resource Manual at 1555
Interference With Ingress and Egress—18 U.S.C. § 1752 Criminal Resource Manual at 1556
Violence Within Premises—18 U.S.C. § 1752 Criminal Resource Manual at 1557
Other Considerations—18 U.S.C. § 1752 Criminal Resource Manual at 1558
General Services Administration Criminal Resource Manual at 1559
Secret Service Uniformed Division Criminal Resource Manual at 1560
[updated May 2012]

9-65.402

Presidential Visit-United States Attorney's Responsibility

When a Presidential visit is scheduled, the United States Attorney should be alert to indications of plans by individuals or groups which may result in activity in violation of Title 18 U.S.C. § 1752. If such activity is anticipated, the United States Attorney should, after consultation with the Secret Service, consider whether preventive measures such as a temporary restraining order would be appropriate, and whether the United States Attorney's Office should be represented at the scene. The United States Attorney should advise the Office of Enforcement Operations of the Criminal Division as early as practicable of the anticipated activity. The United States Attorney should also maintain contact with the appropriate Federal, state, and local law enforcement agencies in order to ensure that background information on the individuals or groups concerned is properly disseminated.

Although state and local ordinances differ as to the exact extent of their coverage, conduct proscribed in 18 U.S.C. § 1752 generally is prohibited in some form at the state or local level. Section 1752 establishes a Federal offense, thus creating Secret Service jurisdiction to prevent such activities.

9-65.463

Competency—Utilization of Federal Facility

Because it is of the utmost importance that the President be fully protected at all times against deranged individuals, if the mental competency of a violator of section 1752 is in question, commitment to an appropriate Federal Medical Center, identified through coordination with the Secret Service, is recommended as an exception to the policy favoring utilization of the services of the local or nearest available psychiatrist or hospital. But see In re Newchurch, 807 F.2d 404 (5th Cir. 1986), as discussed in the Criminal Resource Manual at 1561.

9-65.500

Interference with or Obstruction of the Secret Service—18 U.S.C. § 3056(d)

Section 3056(d) of Title 18 prohibits knowingly and willfully obstructing, resisting, or interfering with a Federal law enforcement agent who is engaged in protective functions. The Secret Service will conduct investigations of alleged violations of 18 U.S.C. § 3056(d) and forward copies of all investigative reports to the United States Attorney and to the Counterterrorism Section (CTS) of the National Security Division. The Counterterrorism Section has supervisory responsibility over 18 U.S.C. § 3056(d).

For an additional discussion of this offense, see the Criminal Resource Manual at 1562.

[updated May 2012]

9-65.600

Assaults on and Kidnapping of Federal Officers

The Organized Crime and Gang Section (OGCS) or Human Rights and Special Prosecutions (HRSP) Section (if international) has supervisory authority over 18 U.S.C. §§ 111 and 1114. See the Criminal Resource Manual at 1563 for a discussion of the investigative jurisdiction. See also:
Assaults in General —18 U.S.C. §§ 111 and 1114 Criminal Resource Manual at 1564
Forcible Act Required— 18 U.S.C. § 111 Threats Criminal Resource Manual at 1565
Knowledge of Victim's Status as a Federal Officer—18 U.S.C. §§ 111 and 1114 Criminal Resource Manual at 1566
Applicability to Informants—18 U.S.C. §§ 111 and 1114 Criminal Resource Manual at 1567
Assaults on Specific Officials—18 U.S.C. § 1114 Criminal Resource Manual at 1568
Assaults on Staff Members of FCI's Criminal Resource Manual at 1569
Assaults on Postal Employees—18 U.S.C. § 1114 Criminal Resource Manual at 1570
Assaults Between Postal Employees Criminal Resource Manual at 1571
Assaults Upon Internal Revenue Service Personnel Criminal Resource Manual at 1572
Kidnapping of Federal Employee/Officer—18 U.S.C. § 1201(a)(5) Criminal Resource Manual at 1573
Kidnapping—Description of Offense—18 U.S.C. § 1201(a)(5) Criminal Resource Manual at 1574
Case Law—18 U.S.C. §§ 111 and 1114 Criminal Resource Manual at 1575
[updated May 2012] [cited in Criminal Resource Manual 6]

9-65.611

General Prosecutive Policy Under 18 U.S.C. § 111

Title 18 U.S.C. § 1114 extends the protection of 18 U.S.C. § 111 to a diverse collection of Federal government personnel. The primary focus of the Department's enforcement program is on those employees who have law enforcement duties which regularly expose them to the public (e.g., agents of the FBI, DEA, ATF, Secret Service, IRS, Customs, Postal Inspectors, etc.) and on staff members of Federal correctional institutions. Forcible acts against these categories Federal employees should be prosecuted vigorously. By contrast, offenses against other categories of Federal employees should be referred to the local prosecutor unless the offense is particularly aggravated or there are other unusual factors present justifying Federal action.

9-65.700

Congressional, Cabinet, and Supreme Court Assassination, Kidnapping, and Assault (18 U.S.C. § 351)

Section 351(g) of Title 18, United States Code, assigns investigative jurisdiction over these offenses to the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI). The Counterterrorism Section of the National Security Division has supervisory authority over 18 U.S.C. § 351, and should be notified telephonically immediately upon the initiation of an investigation.

See the following sections of the Criminal Resource Manual for a discussion of the law relating to the assassination, kidnapping and assault of congressional, cabinet and Supreme Court members

Background— 18 U.S.C. § 351 Criminal Resource Manual at 1601
Killing Individuals Designated in 18 U.S.C. § 351(a) Criminal Resource Manual at 1602
Member of Congress—Defined Criminal Resource Manual at 1603
Member of Congress-Elect—Defined Criminal Resource Manual at 1604
Kidnapping— 18 U.S.C. § 351(b) Criminal Resource Manual at 1605
Attempt to Kill or Kidnap— 18 U.S.C. § 351(c) Criminal Resource Manual at 1606
Dangerous Proximity Test Criminal Resource Manual at 1607
"Any Act or Endeavor" Test Criminal Resource Manual at 1608
Conspiracy to Kill or Kidnap— 18 U.S.C. § 351(d) Criminal Resource Manual at 1609
Assault— 18 U.S.C. § 351(e) Criminal Resource Manual at 1610
Federal Investigative and Prosecutive Jurisdiction—18 U.S.C. § 351—Effect on State and Local Authority  Criminal Resource Manual at 1611
Authorization for Interception of Wire or Oral Communications—18 U.S.C. § 2516 Criminal Resource Manual at 1612
Extraterritoriality— 18 U.S.C. § 351 Criminal Resource Manual at 1613
Posse Comitatus Waiver— 18 U.S.C. § 351 Criminal Resource Manual at 1614
[updated May 2012] [cited in Criminal Resource Manual 6]

9-65.800

Protection of Foreign Officials, Internationally Protected Persons (IPPs) and Official Guests

United States Attorneys should immediately furnish information indicating the existence of any hazard or planned, deliberate attack or conspiracy against foreign officials to the FBI Field Office for FBI dissemination to the United States Secret Service, Department of State, and other interested persons and agencies. United States Attorneys should also provide ongoing assistance to the United States Secret Service in coordinating and obtaining the support of local agencies in the provision of protective services. Supervisory authority over statutes governing the protection of foreign officials, internationally protected persons (IPPs), and official guests rests with the Counterterrorism Section (CTS) of the National Security Division. Supervisory authority for 18 U.S.C § 970 is divided: The Office of Enforcement Operations has supervisory authority over 18 U.S.C. § 970(a); CTS has supervisory authority over Section 970(b). For a discussion of investigative jurisdiction, see the Criminal Resource Manual at 1616.

For a discussion of the law in this area see the following sections of the Criminal Resource Manual

Protection of Foreign Officials—Internationally Protected Persons and Official Guests—18 U.S.C. §§ 112, 878, 970, 1116, 1117 and 1201 Criminal Resource Manual at 1615
Extraterritorial Criminal Jurisdiction—18 U.S.C. §§ 112, 878, 970, 1116, 1117 and 1201 Criminal Resource Manual at 1617
Definitions—18 U.S.C. §§ 112, 878, 970, 1116, 1117 and 1201 Criminal Resource Manual at 1618
Application of Definitional Provisions To Officials of the Coordination Council for North American Affairs— Taiwan Criminal Resource Manual at 1619
Prosecutive Policy—IPP Cases—When Death Penalty is Statutorily Authorized Criminal Resource Manual at 1620
Substantive Offenses—Murder— 18 U.S.C. § 1116 Criminal Resource Manual at 1621
Substantive Offenses—Conspiracy to Murder— 18 U.S.C. § 1117 Criminal Resource Manual at 1622
Substantive Offenses—Kidnapping— 18 U.S.C. § 1201 Criminal Resource Manual at 1623
Substantive Offenses—Assault— 18 U.S.C. § 112 Criminal Resource Manual at 1624
First Amendment— 18 U.S.C. § 112 Criminal Resource Manual at 1625
Threats and Extortion— 18 U.S.C. § 878 Criminal Resource Manual at 1626
Destruction of Property— 18 U.S.C. § 970 Criminal Resource Manual at 1627
[updated May 2012]

9-65.810

Prosecutive Policy—Preference for Local Disposition

In enacting legislation directed to the protection of foreign officials, internationally protected persons, and official guests, Congress has repeatedly made it clear that such statutes are not intended to preempt the application of State and local criminal law governing the same matter. See Pub. L. 92-539, §§ 2, 3; Pub. L. 94-467, § 10. In so doing, Congress has recognized the traditional responsibility of State and local law enforcement authorities for handling common law crimes. Consequently, in cases where State or local law enforcement authorities express a strong preference to prosecute an offense falling under §§ 112, 878, 970, 1116, 1117 and 1201 which relates to foreign dignitaries, the United States Attorney should consider deferring to such request and consult with the Criminal Division in instances where there is disagreement with such authorities as to the appropriate entity to assert criminal jurisdiction.

[cited in USAM 9-65.811]

9-65.811

Authority to Initiate Prosecution

In respect to offenses committed against foreign officials, internationally protected persons, and official guests within the United States, United States Attorneys may ordinarily initiate prosecution without consultation with the Criminal Division. But see USAM 9-65.810, where there is a disagreement between Federal and state/local law enforcement authorities as to who should exercise prosecutive jurisdiction. However, because of the unique foreign policy considerations relating to the diplomatic relationship between the United States and Taiwan, all offenses against members of Taiwan's Coordination Council for North American Affairs (CCNAA) should, absent emergency circumstances, be brought to the attention of the Criminal Division prior to Federal arrest and should, in all cases, be brought to the attention of the Criminal Division prior to indictment.

In cases involving offenses against internationally protected persons committed abroad, legal issues concerning the exercise of extraterritorial jurisdiction, the extraterritorial scope of the statutes, foreign policy considerations, the procurement of witnesses and costs may be involved. Therefore, in cases involving the assertion of extraterritorial jurisdiction under any of these statutes, it is mandatory that Federal prosecutors seek approval from the Criminal Division prior to the initiation of any proposed investigation or prosecution. See USAM 9-2.136.

9-65.880

Demonstrations

Normally the violations of 18 U.S.C. § 970 under consideration occur in the course of demonstrations involving a sizable number of persons. When this is so, United States Attorneys should look to the local police to maintain order and to make any necessary arrests. However, that alone does not relieve Federal officials of responsibilities in the matter. Those responsibilities commence with participation in the coordination of appropriate exchange of intelligence information on potential disturbances likely to affect a foreign facility and arrangements for needed law enforcement response.

As pre-planned or immediately upon notification of a demonstration likely to result in a disturbance, an Assistant United States Attorney should be assigned to monitor the activity on the basis of spot reports from the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) observers at the scene. Presumably the local police will make arrests as the occasion and their judgement dictate. Generally, conduct in violation of the act will also violate local law, but, if only a Federal violation appears, an arrest may be made without obtaining prior authorization from the Criminal Division.

Some suggestion has been made that the FBI observers should make such arrests, but this would not only defeat their purpose as observers but also, because they do not operate in uniform, would be a most ill-advised enforcement effort, inviting the very resistance a uniform is designed to aid in dispelling. This does not mean that an agent on the scene would stand idly by while a mission member entering or leaving the premises was attacked in his/her immediate vicinity. But absent some such exceptional circumstances, any necessary protective measures for protected foreign officials, including arrests for attacks made on their persons should be taken by uniformed officers.

The Counterterrorism Section of the National Security Division has general responsibility for those matters which are of Federal interest. United States Attorneys should be alert for indications of militant political motivation, international in scope with subversive overtones, in reported violations and insure that the presence of any such features of other factors, which may highlight the Federal interest as well as affect the prosecutive merit of a possible violation, are reflected in the FBI's report.

[updated May 2012]

9-65.881

Demonstrations—Procedures

Upon receipt of information indicating a violation or potential violation of 18 U.S.C. § 970, the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), after notifying the Department of State and consulting with the appropriate United States Attorney, will initiate such investigation as is deemed necessary if it is determined that Federal presence is warranted. The State Department Operations Center, (202) 647-1512, can quickly locate and have the appropriate State Department officials contact the U.S. Attorney in cases wherein the United States Attorney is uncertain as to whether the incident will adversely affect the foreign relations of the United States.

The determination made and action initiated, if any, will be reported by the FBI to the Criminal Division, United States Attorney concerned, United States Secret Service, and Department of State without delay. The Bureau will bring to the attention of the Criminal Division for conclusion any unresolved difference of opinion among the Bureau, Secret Service, Department of State, and United States Attorney concerning action or lack thereof by any of them. If a United States Attorney's Office receives a complaint of violation of section 970, the complainant should be referred to the FBI field office concerned, with advice that, as indicated in the Department of State communication, most conduct in possible violation of section 970 is more appropriate for disposition under local law, but the FBI will report the complaint to the appropriate United States authorities for consideration of possible Federal disposition.

When the offense is of a nature that merits Federal prosecution, an investigation should be pursued without regard for whether the pertinent foreign officials will agree to appear as witnesses at an ensuing trial. Once a subject has been identified and sufficient evidence has been developed to form the basis for Federal charges, a determination should be sought as to whether the relevant foreign officials will agree to testify.

In instances where there is a Federal interest sufficient to proceed under one of the protection of foreign officials statutes, it may still be advantageous to defer to a local prosecution. This is particularly true where there is a local statute which better fits the crime than does the Federal statute. However, in such cases, the United States Attorney's Office should insure that the FBI monitors the progress of the local prosecution. Should local efforts be dropped prior to a trial, the matter should be reevaluated by the United States Attorney's Office and a new prosecutive determination should be rendered.

9-65.882

Demonstrations—Investigative Decisions by United States Attorneys

Most demonstrating groups carefully follow the requirements and instructions of the local police officers and when agents of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) have explained the Federal statutes to them, the demonstrators have attempted to comply with those provisions. If the activity is clearly objectionable (obstructing the entrance way to the building using public access systems), the United States Attorney may wish to ask the FBI to conduct an investigation in addition to the normal procedure of maintaining contact with local officials and keeping informed. The availability and willingness to act of local law enforcement officials, who have the resources and the traditional responsibility to protect people and property, are prime factors to weigh when considering Federal involvement. Another factor to consider is the potential adverse effect upon the conduct of our foreign relations which the activity might have. In making this determination, United States Attorneys may wish to contact the Department of State to discuss the potential impact upon the foreign relations of the United States. The State Department Operations Center, (202) 647-1512 or 1513, can locate the proper officials in the State Department who can give such advice. The obstruction of ingress and egress to and from public buildings and/or the use of public address systems or other sound amplification systems usually violates one or more local law statutes or ordinances. Normally, state and local law enforcement officials will enforce such local laws and Federal officers will act after the activity has terminated or in those isolated instances wherein local officials fail to carry out their responsibilities or cannot because of limited statutory authority, or where Federal action is otherwise deemed necessary.

9-65.900

Protection of a Member of a Federal Official's Family (18 U.S.C. § 115)

The Organized Crime and Gang Section (OGCS) or Human Rights and Special Prosecutions (HRSP) Section (if international) has supervisory authority over 18 U.S.C. § 115. Consultation with HRSP is required before initiating an investigation if the matter involves international terrorism. The agency which would have investigative jurisdiction over an assault or murder of a particular Federal official will have corresponding investigative jurisdiction over an assault or murder of a member of that Federal official's family. In most cases, this will be the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI). See the Criminal Resource Manual at 1563. See also the Criminal Resource Manual at 1628.

[updated May 2012] [cited in Criminal Resource Manual 4]