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'Near Repeat' Theory into a Geospatial Policing Strategy: A Randomized Experiment Testing a Theoretically-Informed Strategy for Preventing Residential Burglary, Baltimore County, Maryland and Redlands, California, 2014-2015
  • Description:These data are part of NACJD's Fast Track Release and are distributed as they were received from the data depositor. The files have been zipped by NACJD for release, but not checked or processed except for the removal of direct identifiers. Users should refer to the accompanying readme file for a brief description of the files available with this collection and consult the investigator(s) if further information is needed. This data collection represents an experimental micro-level geospatial crime prevention strategy that attempted to interrupt the near repeat (NR) pattern in residential burglary by creating a NR space-time high risk zone around residential burglaries as they occurred and then using uniformed volunteers to notify residents of their increased risk and provide burglary prevention tips. The research used a randomized controlled trial to test whether high risk zones that received the notification had fewer subsequent burglaries than those that did not. In addition, two surveys were administered to gauge the impact of the program, one of residents of the treatment areas and one of treatment providers. The collection contains 6 Stata datasets: BCo_FinalData_20180118_Archiving.dta(n = 484, 8 variables)Red_FinalData_20180117_Archiving.dta (n = 268, 8 variables)BCo_FinalDatasetOtherCrime_ForArchiving_v2.dta(n = 484, 8 variables)Redlands_FinalDataSecondary_ForArchiving_v2.dta (n = 266, 8 variables)ResidentSurvey_AllResponses_V1.4_ArchiveCleaned.dta (n = 457, 42 variables)VolunteerSurvey_V1.2_ArchiveCleaned.dta (n = 38, 16 variables) The collection also includes 5 sets of geographic information system (GIS) data: BaltimoreCounty_Bnd.zipBC_NR_HRZs.zipBurglaryAreaMinus800_NoApts.zipRedlands_CityBnd.zipRedlandsNR_HRZs.shp.zip
  • Last Update:2019-05-30T13:46:36
  • Public Access Level:restricted public
  • Identity:3569
  • Publisher:National Institute of Justice, 22, OJP, Office of Justice Programs, 10, 10, DOJ, Department of Justice
  • Contact Name:Open Data Office of Justice Programs (USDOJ), mailto:opendata@usdoj.gov
  • Tags:burglary, crime mapping, crime prevention, crime reduction, police intervention
  • Bureau Code:011:21
  • Program Code:011:060
  • License:http://www.usa.gov/publicdomain/label/1.0/
  • Rights:These data are restricted due to the increased risk of violation of confidentiality of respondent and subject data.
  • Release Date:2019-05-30T13:38:19
  • Language:eng
  • Distribution:
    https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR37108.v1, 'Near Repeat' Theory into a Geospatial Policing Strategy: A Randomized Experiment Testing a Theoretically-Informed Strategy for Preventing Residential Burglary, Baltimore County, Maryland and Redlands, California, 2014-2015
21 Code of Federal Regulations
  • Description:21 Code of Federal Regulations
  • Last Update:2014-01-29T00:00:00
  • Public Access Level:public
  • Identity:348
  • Publisher:Drug Enforcement Administration, 10, DOJ, Department of Justice
  • Contact Name:Steven Purkeypile, mailto:Steven.J.Purkeypile@usdoj.gov
  • Tags:21 Code of Federal Regulations
  • Bureau Code:011:12
  • Program Code:011:019
  • License:http://www.usa.gov/publicdomain/label/1.0/
  • Release Date:2014-01-29T00:00:00
  • Distribution:
21 United States Code (Controlled Substances Act)
  • Description:21 United States Code (Controlled Substances Act)
  • Last Update:2014-01-30T00:00:00
  • Public Access Level:public
  • Identity:349
  • Publisher:Drug Enforcement Administration, 10, DOJ, Department of Justice
  • Contact Name:Steven Purkeypile, mailto:Steven.J.Purkeypile@usdoj.gov
  • Tags:21 United States Code (Controlled Substances Act)
  • Bureau Code:011:12
  • Program Code:011:019
  • License:http://www.usa.gov/publicdomain/label/1.0/
  • Release Date:2014-01-30T00:00:00
  • Distribution:
A Behavioral Study of the Radicalization Trajectories of American "Homegrown" Al Qaeda-Inspired Terrorist Offenders, 2001-2015 [UNITED STATES]
  • Description: These data are part of NACJD's Fast Track Release and are distributed as they were received from the data depositor. The files have been zipped by NACJD for release, but not checked or processed except for the removal of direct identifiers. Users should refer to the accompanying readme file for a brief description of the files available with this collection and consult the investigator(s) if further information is needed. The study aimed to develop and empirically test a dynamic risk assessment model of radicalization process characteristics of homegrown terrorists inspired by Al Qaeda's ideology. The New York Police Department (NYPD) model developed by Mitchell D. Silber and Arvin Bhatt was chosen as the basis for creating a typology of overt and detectable indicators of individual behaviors widely thought to be associated with extremism. Specific behavioral cues associated with each stage of radicalization were coded and used to estimate the sequencing of behaviors and the duration of the average radicalization trajectory. Out of 331 homegrown American Jihadists (Group A), 135 were selected for further examination of their radicalization (Group B). Data were collected from public records ranging from social media postings by the offenders themselves to evidence introduced in the adjudication of the offenses for which the offenders were incarcerated. Life histories were compiled for Group B, whose detailed biographies were used to chart the timelines of their radicalization trajectories. The collection includes an Excel file which contains one data table for Group A (10 variables, n=331) and two data tables for Group B (32 variables, n=135 and 5 variables, n=135, respectively). An accompanying codebook file details the variables in these tables. There is also a document with approximately 1 page narratives for each of the 135 individuals in Group B. A file containing a key indicating the names of the subjects is not available with this collection.
  • Last Update:2016-12-15T10:00:43
  • Public Access Level:restricted public
  • Identity:3323
  • Publisher:National Institute of Justice, 22, OJP, Office of Justice Programs, 10, 10, DOJ, Department of Justice
  • Contact Name:Open Data Office of Justice Programs (USDOJ), mailto:opendata@usdoj.gov
  • Tags:al Qaeda, radicalism, terrorism, terrorist profiles, terrorist prosecution, terrorists
  • Bureau Code:011:21
  • Program Code:011:060
  • License:http://www.usa.gov/publicdomain/label/1.0/
  • Rights:These data are restricted due to the increased risk of violation of confidentiality of respondent and subject data.
  • Release Date:2016-12-15T09:50:35
  • Language:eng
  • Distribution:
    https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR36452.v1, A Behavioral Study of the Radicalization Trajectories of American "Homegrown" Al Qaeda-Inspired Terrorist Offenders, 2001-2015 [UNITED STATES]
About us
  • Description:About us
  • Last Update:2014-03-03T00:00:00
  • Public Access Level:public
  • Identity:350
  • Publisher:Drug Enforcement Administration, 10, DOJ, Department of Justice
  • Contact Name:Steven Purkeypile, mailto:Steven.J.Purkeypile@usdoj.gov
  • Tags:About us
  • Bureau Code:011:12
  • Program Code:011:019
  • License:http://www.usa.gov/publicdomain/label/1.0/
  • Release Date:2014-03-03T00:00:00
  • Distribution:
A Brief Motivational Interview Intervention to Reduce Dating Abuse Perpetration, Boston, Massachusetts, 2014-2017
  • Description:This study tests a brief intervention designed to reduce adolescent dating abuse (ADA) perpetration in a healthcare setting used primarily by low income, Black, and Hispanic youth. The Project READY (Reducing Aggression in Dating Relationships for Youth) is a theory-driven, empirically supported, brief intervention. READY intercepts youth who utilize an urban emergency department for non-urgent health care (e.g., sprains), provides them with tailored feedback about their relationship behavior, and uses motivational interviewing to move them towards non-violence and respect. READY was designed to avoid victim-blaming and is responsive to the gendered dynamic of ADA. A small feasibility pilot test of READY was completed in 2013 (N=27). Participants were 173 youth ages 15-19 years old who were patients of an urban pediatric emergency department. Youth who perpetrated at least 1 act of physical or sexual ADA 3 months prior to baseline were eligible. The proposed experimental evaluation of READY used a randomized controlled trial (RCT) design, with 3- and 6-month follow-ups to assess changes in knowledge, attitude and perpetration behavior. The hypotheses are: (1) Youth who participate in the brief intervention session and telephone booster call will report improved knowledge and attitudes, and less self-reported ADA perpetration up to 6 months post-intervention as compared to youth in the control group; and (2) the cost of providing the intervention will be less than the cost of the violence that occurs in its absence. Mixed effects linear and logistic models were used to analyze longitudinal data.
  • Last Update:2020-04-27T13:34:47
  • Public Access Level:restricted public
  • Identity:3471
  • Publisher:National Institute of Justice, 22, OJP, Office of Justice Programs, 10, 10, DOJ, Department of Justice
  • Contact Name:Open Data Office of Justice Programs (USDOJ), mailto:opendata@usdoj.gov
  • Tags:abuse, adolescents, aggression, dating (social), intervention, intimate partner violence, violence against women
  • Bureau Code:011:21
  • Program Code:011:060
  • License:http://www.usa.gov/publicdomain/label/1.0/
  • Rights:These data are restricted due to the increased risk of violation of confidentiality of respondent and subject data.
  • Release Date:2020-04-27T13:32:21
  • Language:eng
  • Distribution:
    https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR36879.v1, A Brief Motivational Interview Intervention to Reduce Dating Abuse Perpetration, Boston, Massachusetts, 2014-2017
A Case Study of K-12 School Employee Sexual Misconduct: Lessons Learned from Title IX Policy Implementation, United States, 1984-2014
  • Description:These data are part of NACJD's Fast Track Release and are distributed as they were received from the data depositor. The files have been zipped by NACJD for release, but not checked or processed except for the removal of direct identifiers. Users should refer to the accompanying readme file for a brief description of the files available with this collection and consult the investigator(s) if further information is needed. This study was designed to examine how districts that experienced an incident of school employee sexual misconduct in 2014 defined, interpreted, and implemented key elements of Title IX before, during, and after an incident. The study used a qualitative case study design with a purposeful sample of five districts recruited from a database of 459 districts who experienced a case of school employee sexual misconduct in 2014. The study was conducted between January 2016 and September 2017. Data collected included: 1) various district documents, 2) 41 interviews with primary actors (school employees and county officials directly involved in responding to the incident), 3) 10 focus groups with 51 secondary actors (school employees who were not directly involved with the incident but who might have been indirectly affected by it), and 4) offender, victim and district characteristics. Documents reviewed included written policies and protocols, training materials and handbooks for staff and students, case documents, and other guiding documents as applicable. In interviews and focus groups, participants were asked to discuss their knowledge of district policies and procedures, to describe the dissemination of and any changes to these policies and procedures, and to provide recommendations for improvement. To protect the confidentiality all district and participant identifying information is confidential and has been removed from any reporting.
  • Last Update:2018-09-14T09:44:12
  • Public Access Level:restricted public
  • Identity:3470
  • Publisher:National Institute of Justice, 22, OJP, Office of Justice Programs, 10, 10, DOJ, Department of Justice
  • Contact Name:Open Data Office of Justice Programs (USDOJ), mailto:opendata@usdoj.gov
  • Tags:convictions (law), crime reporting, education, education costs, educational administrators, educational policy, school districts, school personnel, sex offender registration, sex offenders, sex offenses, sexual abuse, sexual assault, sexual exploitation,
  • Bureau Code:011:21
  • Program Code:011:060
  • License:http://www.usa.gov/publicdomain/label/1.0/
  • Rights:These data are restricted due to the increased risk of violation of confidentiality of respondent and subject data.
  • Release Date:2018-09-14T09:41:32
  • Language:eng
  • Distribution:
    https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR36870.v1, A Case Study of K-12 School Employee Sexual Misconduct: Lessons Learned from Title IX Policy Implementation, United States, 1984-2014
A Comparative Study of Violent Extremism and Gangs, United States, 1948-2018
  • Description:The study assesses the extent of commonalities between individuals who become involved in violent extremist groups and criminal gangs, and the processes by which individuals engage in each group. Following this comparison, the extent to which the empirical results support the potential for anti-gang programs to bolster the resilience of communities against violent extremism and other forms of crime is assessed. Quantitative assessment was conducted by comparing individuals included in the Profiles of Individual Radicalization in the United States (PIRUS) dataset with a subset of individuals drawn from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 (NLSY97) along a number of demographic, social, and socioeconomic characteristics. Supplementary survey data was also collected from 45 former and current gang members in the United States concurrently with long-form interviews, covering a range of variables including background characteristics, demographic information, and attitudes among the respondents.
  • Last Update:2021-01-27T10:44:40
  • Public Access Level:restricted public
  • Identity:3916
  • Publisher:National Institute of Justice, 22, OJP, Office of Justice Programs, 10, 10, DOJ, Department of Justice
  • Contact Name:Open Data Office of Justice Programs (USDOJ), mailto:opendata@usdoj.gov
  • Tags:crime patterns, criminality prediction, extremism, gang members, gangs, offender profiles, radicalism, terrorism
  • Bureau Code:011:21
  • Program Code:011:060
  • License:http://www.usa.gov/publicdomain/label/1.0/
  • Rights:These data are restricted due to the increased risk of violation of confidentiality of respondent and subject data.
  • Release Date:2021-01-27T10:40:19
  • Language:eng
  • Distribution:
    https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR37386.v1, A Comparative Study of Violent Extremism and Gangs, United States, 1948-2018
A Comprehensive Evaluation of a Drug Market Intervention Training Cohort in Roanoke, Virginia; Jacksonville, Florida; and Guntersville, Alabama, 2011-2013.
  • Description: The Drug Market Intervention (DMI) has been identified as a promising practice for disrupting overt-drug markets, reducing the crime and disorder associated with drug sales, and improving police-community relations. Montgomery County, Maryland; Flint, Michigan; Guntersville, Alabama; Lake County, Indiana; Jacksonville, Florida; New Orleans, Louisiana; and Roanoke, Virginia applied for and received DMI training and technical assistance from Michigan State University in 2010 and 2011. This study followed the seven sites that were trained in the program to determine how the program was implemented, how the DMI affected the targeted drug market, whether the program affected crime and disorder, whether the program improved police-community relations, and how much the program cost.
  • Last Update:2016-09-27T15:02:25
  • Public Access Level:restricted public
  • Identity:1185
  • Publisher:National Institute of Justice, 22, OJP, Office of Justice Programs, 10, 10, DOJ, Department of Justice
  • Contact Name:Open Data Office of Justice Programs (USDOJ), mailto:opendata@usdoj.gov
  • Tags:community involvement, community participation, community policing, drug abuse, drug law enforcement, drug law offenses, drug offenders, drugs, intervention, intervention strategies, police citizen interactions, police community relations, police effectiv
  • Bureau Code:011:21
  • Program Code:011:060
  • License:http://www.usa.gov/publicdomain/label/1.0/
  • Rights:These data are restricted due to the increased risk of violation of confidentiality of respondent and subject data.
  • Release Date:2016-09-27T14:59:45
  • Language:eng
  • Distribution:
    https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR36322.v1, A Comprehensive Evaluation of a Drug Market Intervention Training Cohort in Roanoke, Virginia; Jacksonville, Florida; and Guntersville, Alabama, 2011-2013.
Addressing Sexual Violence in Prisons: A National Snapshot of Approaches and Highlights of Innovative Strategies, 2004-2005: [United States]
  • Description: These data are part of NACJD's Fast Track Release and are distributed as they were received from the data depositor. The files have been zipped by NACJD for release, but not checked or processed except for the removal of direct identifiers. Users should refer to the accompanying readme file for a brief description of the files available with this collection and consult the investigator(s) if further information is needed. Before the Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA) of 2003, it was not clear the extent to which state departments of corrections (DOCs) were addressing sexual violence in systematic ways. In fact, little information existed about what strategies were being put into practice in prison systems across the country. PREA changed the way DOCs addressed prison sexual violence (PSV). Mandatory recordkeeping and a push for eliminating such incidents moved many DOCs to develop specific responses to PSV or to further refine approaches already in place. The purpose of this project was to provide a national snapshot of DOC initiatives to address PSV, as well as to identify specific practices that seemed to be, in the absence of formal evaluations, particularly promising or innovative in nature. Researchers conducted three tasks: (1) The Survey of State Correctional Administrators (SSCA) involving written surveys and follow-up phone interviews with leaders of state DOCs. During the survey, state administrators described the state's overall approach to PSV and nominated specific strategies as particularly promising; (2) The Survey of Promising Practices (SPP) involving phone interviews with DOC representatives who spoke about promising practices nominated during the SSCA. Interviews were conducted with facility directors, service providers, or other state personnel affiliated with nominated approaches; and (3) Case studies involving site visits to states that researchers determined could provide the most informative lessons on addressing sexual violence in prison to the largest audience of practitioners, researchers, and policymakers. The collection includes 2 Access databases, one each for the SSCA (ASCA_4_6_2006.directors.mdb) and the SSP (ASCA_FAC_4_6_2006.prompractices.mdb). The data related to the Case Studies are not available at this time.
  • Last Update:2017-03-21T10:27:16
  • Public Access Level:restricted public
  • Identity:3401
  • Publisher:National Institute of Justice, 22, OJP, Office of Justice Programs, 10, 10, DOJ, Department of Justice
  • Contact Name:Open Data Office of Justice Programs (USDOJ), mailto:opendata@usdoj.gov
  • Tags:correctional facilities, correctional guards, correctional officers, corrections management, inmates, prison administration, prison conditions, prison violence, rape, sexual assault
  • Bureau Code:011:21
  • Program Code:011:060
  • License:http://www.usa.gov/publicdomain/label/1.0/
  • Rights:These data are restricted due to the increased risk of violation of confidentiality of respondent and subject data.
  • Release Date:2017-03-21T10:12:34
  • Language:eng
  • Distribution:
    https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR33971.v1, Addressing Sexual Violence in Prisons: A National Snapshot of Approaches and Highlights of Innovative Strategies, 2004-2005: [United States]
Addressing Under-reporting of Minor Victim Sex Trafficking, Florida, 2011-2017
  • Description:This study addresses the underreporting of minor victim sex trafficking, by describing the number and characteristics of children with allegations of sex or labor trafficking investigated by Florida's Department of Children and Families (DCF). Analyses conducted within the grant include descriptive work on how children with investigated allegations of human trafficking differ from others in the child welfare population, human trafficking allegations among children with missing from care episodes, and labor trafficking of children. Analyses also use mixture models to describe risk profiles associated with trafficking victimization and the under-identification of trafficking.
  • Last Update:2020-11-30T11:44:15
  • Public Access Level:restricted public
  • Identity:3805
  • Publisher:National Institute of Justice, 22, OJP, Office of Justice Programs, 10, 10, DOJ, Department of Justice
  • Contact Name:Open Data Office of Justice Programs (USDOJ), mailto:opendata@usdoj.gov
  • Tags:child welfare, human trafficking, sex offenses, sex trafficking
  • Bureau Code:011:21
  • Program Code:011:060
  • License:http://www.usa.gov/publicdomain/label/1.0/
  • Rights:These data are restricted due to the increased risk of violation of confidentiality of respondent and subject data.
  • Release Date:2020-11-30T11:31:15
  • Language:eng
  • Distribution:
    https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR37169.v1, Addressing Under-reporting of Minor Victim Sex Trafficking, Florida, 2011-2017
Adjusting the National Crime Victimization Survey's Estimates of Rape and Domestic Violence for Gag Factors, 1986-1990
  • Description:The purpose of this project was to use statistical modeling techniques to estimate rape and domestic assault rates, adjusting for interviewing conditions under which the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS) was administered. Data for women 16 years of age and older interviewed in the NCVS (see NATIONAL CRIME SURVEYS: NATIONAL SAMPLE, 1986-1990 [NEAR-TERM DATA] [ICPSR 8864]) were analyzed. The researchers considered whether the type of interview (personal or telephone) and the presence of another person (particularly a spouse) influenced or "gagged" the reporting of rape and domestic violence in the NCVS. The researchers also investigated correlates, primarily demographic in nature, of reporting rape, domestic violence, other assaults, and breaking and entry. In total, the data file contains reports of 434 rapes, 1,973 incidents of domestic violence, 13,459 other assaults, and 88,950 incidents of breaking and entry. The binary-coded variables provide information on whether the respondent was alone during the interview, others who were present, whether the interview was by telephone, whether the respondent refused a telephone interview, the number of persons who lived in the household, whether the respondent owned her home, whether the land use was urban, whether the household the respondent was living in was the same household from the last interview, whether the respondent had moved more than three times in the last five years, and whether an assault, domestic violence incident, rape, breaking and entry, or no crime was reported. Demographic information includes the respondent's education, income, employment during the last six months, marital status at the time of the interview, and whether the respondent was white (or non-white) or Hispanic (or non-Hispanic). Variables coded the same as the NCVS variables include age, respondent's relationship to the offender, type of crime, year and quarter of interview, NCVS control number, and person weight.
  • Last Update:1996-10-01T00:00:00
  • Public Access Level:public
  • Identity:3900
  • Publisher:National Institute of Justice, 22, OJP, Office of Justice Programs, 10, 10, DOJ, Department of Justice
  • Contact Name:Open Government US Department of Justice (USDOJ), mailto:opengov@usdoj.gov
  • Tags:assault, burglary, crime, crime costs, crime rates, crime reporting, crime statistics, domestic violence, living arrangements, offenders, offenses, rape, reactions to crime, robbery, sexual offenses, victimization, victims, women
  • Bureau Code:011:21
  • Program Code:011:060
  • License:http://www.usa.gov/publicdomain/label/1.0/
  • Release Date:1996-10-01T00:00:00
  • Language:eng
  • Distribution:
    https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR06558.v1, Adjusting the National Crime Victimization Survey's Estimates of Rape and Domestic Violence for Gag Factors, 1986-1990
Adolescent Sexual Assault Victims' Experiences with SANE-SARTs and the Criminal Justice System, 1998-2007
  • Description:The study examined adolescent sexual assault survivors' help-seeking experiences with the legal and medical systems in two Midwestern communities that have different models of Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner (SANE)/Sexual Assault Response Team (SART) interventions. In Dataset 1 (Qualitative Victim Interviews), investigators conducted qualitative interviews with N=20 adolescent sexual assault victims 14-17 years old. From these interviews, investigators identified three distinct patterns of survivors' post-assault disclosures and their pathways to seeking help from SANE programs and the criminal justice system: voluntary (survivors' contact with the legal and medical system was by their choice), involuntary (system contact was not by choice), and situational (circumstances of the assault itself prompted involuntary disclosure). Interviews included responses that described the assault, their experience with both the SANE/SART programs and the criminal justice system, and victim and offender demographic information. In Dataset 2 (SANE Programs Quantitative Data), investigators obtained SANE program records, police and prosecutor records, and crime lab findings for a sample of N=395 (ages 13-17) adolescent sexual assault victims who sought services from the local SANE programs in two different counties. The data collected examined victim's progress through the criminal justice system. Factors that could potentially affect case progression were also examined; age of victim, relationship to offender, assault characteristics, number of assaults on victim, and evidence collected. Differences between the two different counties' programs were also examined for their effect on the case progression.
  • Last Update:2013-12-13T15:11:45
  • Public Access Level:restricted public
  • Identity:3164
  • Publisher:National Institute of Justice, 22, OJP, Office of Justice Programs, 10, 10, DOJ, Department of Justice
  • Contact Name:Open Data Office of Justice Programs (USDOJ), mailto:opendata@usdoj.gov
  • Tags:adolescents, case processing, program evaluation, programs, rape, sexual assault
  • Bureau Code:011:21
  • Program Code:011:060
  • License:http://www.usa.gov/publicdomain/label/1.0/
  • Rights:These data are restricted due to the increased risk of violation of confidentiality of respondent and subject data.
  • Release Date:2013-12-13T15:00:42
  • Language:eng
  • Distribution:
    https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR29721.v1, Adolescent Sexual Assault Victims' Experiences with SANE-SARTs and the Criminal Justice System, 1998-2007
Adult Criminal Careers, Michigan: 1974-1977
  • Description:These data, taken from the computerized criminal history files of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, were collected to develop estimates of the extent and variation of individual offending. Included are the adult criminal records of individuals 17 years of age and older arrested in Michigan from 1974 to 1977. The primary criterion for inclusion in the sample was at least one arrest in Michigan for murder, rape, robbery, aggravated assault, burglary, or auto theft. Once sampled, the arrest history includes data on all recorded arrests through 1977, regardless of offense type. The full dataset includes records for 41,191 individuals for a total of 200,007 arrests. The dataset is organized by individual and includes demographic characteristics of the individual (birth date, state of birth, sex, and race) followed by information from the individual's arrest record in chronological order. The arrest records include the date of arrest, the offenses charged, the disposition (convicted, dismissed, or acquitted), and the sentence. Because the data are organized by individual, they are suitable for longitudinal analyses of individual offending patterns over time.
  • Last Update:1995-03-31T00:00:00
  • Public Access Level:public
  • Identity:2816
  • Publisher:National Institute of Justice, 22, OJP, Office of Justice Programs, 10, 10, DOJ, Department of Justice
  • Contact Name:Open Data Office of Justice Programs (USDOJ), mailto:opendata@usdoj.gov
  • Tags:arrests, assault, auto theft, burglary, convictions (law), crime, defendants, demographic characteristics, murder, rape, robbery
  • Bureau Code:011:21
  • Program Code:011:060
  • License:http://www.usa.gov/publicdomain/label/1.0/
  • Release Date:1984-11-14T00:00:00
  • Language:eng
  • Distribution:
    https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR08279.v1, Adult Criminal Careers, Michigan: 1974-1977
Adult Criminal Careers in New York, 1972-1983
  • Description:This data collection was designed to estimate the extent and variation of individual offending by crime type, race, age, and prior criminal record. Included in this collection are the criminal records of individuals aged 16 years or older who were arrested in the state of New York. Two separate data files are supplied. Part 1 contains data on all adults arrested in New York from 1972 to 1976 for rape, murder, robbery, aggravated assault, or burglary. Part 2 includes data on all adults arrested for larceny or auto theft in Albany and Erie counties. Variables include items such as sex, race, age, number of prior arrests, date and place of arrest, arrest charged, number of multiple counts, court disposition of charges, and type and length of sentence.
  • Last Update:2006-01-12T00:00:00
  • Public Access Level:public
  • Identity:3268
  • Publisher:National Institute of Justice, 22, OJP, Office of Justice Programs, 10, 10, DOJ, Department of Justice
  • Contact Name:Open Data Office of Justice Programs (USDOJ), mailto:opendata@usdoj.gov
  • Tags:adult offenders, assault, auto theft, burglary, career criminals, criminal histories, larceny, murder, offenders, rape, robbery
  • Bureau Code:011:21
  • Program Code:011:060
  • License:http://www.usa.gov/publicdomain/label/1.0/
  • Release Date:1990-07-06T00:00:00
  • Language:eng
  • Distribution:
    https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR09353.v1, Adult Criminal Careers in New York, 1972-1983
African American Experience of Sexual Assault in Maryland, 2003-2006
  • Description:The purpose of this study was to better understand the problem of sexual assault among African American women in Maryland, assess their use of available resources in response to sexual assault, and explore their use of alternative sources of care. Researchers interviewed 223 female victims of sexual assault (Part 1 and Part 2) between January 2004 and July 2005 and conducted 21 focus groups (Part 3) with sexual assault resource service providers between 2003 and 2006. Criteria for inclusion in the interview component (Part 1 and Part 2) of the study included: African American or Caucasian female, aged 18 and over, resident of Maryland, and victim of sexual assault. There were four streams of recruitment for the interview portion of the study: Victims receiving services at one of 18 rape crisis centers located throughout the state of Maryland; Community outreach sessions conducted by rape crisis center community educators; Through community service providers, including those working in domestic violence centers, forensic nurse examiners (SAFE programs), probation and parole offices, reproductive health centers, county health departments, community services agencies, Historically Black Colleges and Universities, and local colleges; and Through three detention centers housing female inmates. For Part 3 (Focus Group Qualitative Data), rape crisis center representatives and other community service provider representatives received a letter informing them that a focus group was going to be conducted at the end of their study training session and asked them for their participation. Part 1 (Victim Quantitative Data) includes items in the following categories: Personal Demographics, Details of the Sexual Assault, Medical Care, Law Enforcement, Prosecution/Court Process, Sexual Assault Center Services, Other Counseling Services, and Recommendations for Improvement. Part 2 (Victim Qualitative Data) includes responses to selected questions from Part 1. The data are organized by question, not by respondent. Part 3 (Focus Group Qualitative Data) includes questions on the needs of African American women who have been sexually assaulted, whether their needs are different from those of women of other racial/ethnic backgrounds, unique barriers to reporting sexual assault to police for African American women and their treatment by the criminal justice system, unique issues concerning the use of available resources by African American women, such as post-rape medical care and counseling services, and recommendations on how the state of Maryland could improve services for African American women who are the victims of sexual assault.
  • Last Update:2009-04-30T09:51:35
  • Public Access Level:restricted public
  • Identity:3547
  • Publisher:National Institute of Justice, 22, OJP, Office of Justice Programs, 10, 10, DOJ, Department of Justice
  • Contact Name:Open Data Office of Justice Programs (USDOJ), mailto:opendata@usdoj.gov
  • Tags:African Americans, rape, service providers, sex offenses, sexual assault, victim services, violence against women
  • Bureau Code:011:21
  • Program Code:011:060
  • License:http://www.usa.gov/publicdomain/label/1.0/
  • Rights:These data are restricted due to the increased risk of violation of confidentiality of respondent and subject data.
  • Release Date:2009-04-30T09:47:19
  • Language:eng
  • Distribution:
    https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR25201.v1, African American Experience of Sexual Assault in Maryland, 2003-2006
Aftercare Services for Juvenile Parolees with Mental Disorders in Ohio, 2005-2006
  • Description:The purpose of the study was to examine the aftercare services juvenile parolees with mental disorders receive as they transition from correctional facilities to the community. The study assessed rates of recidivism for juvenile parolees with mental disorders, the type and frequency of mental health care received in the community by youth on parole, and the relationship between parolees' recidivism and functional outcomes with their utilization of mental health care. The sample came from the Ohio Department of Youth Services (DYS), which covers youths aged 10 to 21 sentenced to correctional care for the 88 Ohio counties in 2005 and 2006. The actual cohort was composed of 175 youths aged 12 to 19 years who had a presumptive release date within the next 60 days and were placed on the mental health caseload. Data were collected in 2005 and 2006 at four time points: one month pre-release, one month post-release, three months post-release, and six months post-release. Variables were gathered from the Ohio DYS and through the administration of a variety of standardized surveys and interview protocols. The main categories of variables include variables relating to arrest history and recidivism, variables relating to the mental health of subjects, variables relating to the administration of mental health treatment and health insurance coverage post-release, and demographic variables.
  • Last Update:2013-12-13T16:41:03
  • Public Access Level:restricted public
  • Identity:3861
  • Publisher:National Institute of Justice, 22, OJP, Office of Justice Programs, 10, 10, DOJ, Department of Justice
  • Contact Name:Open Data Office of Justice Programs (USDOJ), mailto:opendata@usdoj.gov
  • Tags:criminal histories, delinquent behavior, health care access, health insurance, juvenile offenders, juvenile recidivists, mental health, mental health services, postrelease programs, prisoner reentry, recidivism, recidivism prediction, recidivism rates, re
  • Bureau Code:011:21
  • Program Code:011:060
  • License:http://www.usa.gov/publicdomain/label/1.0/
  • Rights:These data are restricted due to the increased risk of violation of confidentiality of respondent and subject data.
  • Release Date:2013-12-13T16:38:19
  • Language:eng
  • Distribution:
    https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR20624.v1, Aftercare Services for Juvenile Parolees with Mental Disorders in Ohio, 2005-2006
AG/BIA Precedent Decisions
Age-by-Race Specific Crime Rates, 1965-1985: [United States]
  • Description:These data examine the effects on total crime rates of changes in the demographic composition of the population and changes in criminality of specific age and race groups. The collection contains estimates from national data of annual age-by-race specific arrest rates and crime rates for murder, robbery, and burglary over the 21-year period 1965-1985. The data address the following questions: (1) Are the crime rates reported by the Uniform Crime Reports (UCR) data series valid indicators of national crime trends? (2) How much of the change between 1965 and 1985 in total crime rates for murder, robbery, and burglary is attributable to changes in the age and race composition of the population, and how much is accounted for by changes in crime rates within age-by-race specific subgroups? (3) What are the effects of age and race on subgroup crime rates for murder, robbery, and burglary? (4) What is the effect of time period on subgroup crime rates for murder, robbery, and burglary? (5) What is the effect of birth cohort, particularly the effect of the very large (baby-boom) cohorts following World War II, on subgroup crime rates for murder, robbery, and burglary? (6) What is the effect of interactions among age, race, time period, and cohort on subgroup crime rates for murder, robbery, and burglary? (7) How do patterns of age-by-race specific crime rates for murder, robbery, and burglary compare for different demographic subgroups? The variables in this study fall into four categories. The first category includes variables that define the race-age cohort of the unit of observation. The values of these variables are directly available from UCR and include year of observation (from 1965-1985), age group, and race. The second category of variables were computed using UCR data pertaining to the first category of variables. These are period, birth cohort of age group in each year, and average cohort size for each single age within each single group. The third category includes variables that describe the annual age-by-race specific arrest rates for the different crime types. These variables were estimated for race, age, group, crime type, and year using data directly available from UCR and population estimates from Census publications. The fourth category includes variables similar to the third group. Data for estimating these variables were derived from available UCR data on the total number of offenses known to the police and total arrests in combination with the age-by-race specific arrest rates for the different crime types.
  • Last Update:2005-11-04T00:00:00
  • Public Access Level:public
  • Identity:3835
  • Publisher:National Institute of Justice, 22, OJP, Office of Justice Programs, 10, 10, DOJ, Department of Justice
  • Contact Name:Open Data Office of Justice Programs (USDOJ), mailto:opendata@usdoj.gov
  • Tags:age, arrests, burglary, crime rates, demographic characteristics, murder, population characteristics, race, rape, robbery
  • Bureau Code:011:21
  • Program Code:011:060
  • License:http://www.usa.gov/publicdomain/label/1.0/
  • Release Date:1991-10-23T00:00:00
  • Language:eng
  • Distribution:
    https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR09589.v1, Age-by-Race Specific Crime Rates, 1965-1985: [United States]
Age and Sex Estimation from the Human Clavicle in the American Population, 1912-1938 and 1986-1998
  • Description:This study investigated skeletal maturation and gender dimorphism in the human clavicle in the American population. Biological data were collected on two skeletal collections: the William F. McCormick Clavicle Collection and the Hamann-Todd Osteological Collection. Size and shape data were collected from computed tomography (CT) scans of the McCormick clavicles. Several automated measurements were taken on 1,413 McCormick clavicles, including three traditional and six non-traditional measurements (Dataset 1). A total of 593 individuals from the William F. McCormick Clavicle Collection (Dataset 2) and 354 individuals from the Hamann-Todd Osteological Collection (Dataset 3) were scored for medial clavicular epiphyseal fusion using McKern and Stewart's (1957) five-phase rating system.
  • Last Update:2014-06-19T15:53:02
  • Public Access Level:public
  • Identity:3685
  • Publisher:National Institute of Justice, 22, OJP, Office of Justice Programs, 10, 10, DOJ, Department of Justice
  • Contact Name:Open Data Office of Justice Programs (USDOJ), mailto:opendata@usdoj.gov
  • Tags:demographic characteristics, forensic sciences, gender, physical characteristics
  • Bureau Code:011:21
  • Program Code:011:060
  • License:http://www.usa.gov/publicdomain/label/1.0/
  • Release Date:2014-06-19T15:53:02
  • Language:eng
  • Distribution:
    https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR25901.v1, Age and Sex Estimation from the Human Clavicle in the American Population, 1912-1938 and 1986-1998


Open Data at DOJ
For government-wide FOIA information including how to make a FOIA request to other federal agencies, please visit FOIA.GOV.
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