Version api_v1

API Overview

The base URL for all API resources described below is: http://www.justice.gov

Fields and Parameters

You may specify which fields should be returned by the API in the response. If you do not specify any fields, all fields will be returned by default. Two identifier fields are available:
  • UUID: A universal unique identifier for a single result
  • VUUID: A universal unique identifier for a specific version of a single result
You may filter by any field that is returned in a response by passing it as a parameter. For example, if you see the 'position' field in a response, you can filter results by the 'position' field by appending:
parameters[position]=law_student_volunteer_academic_year

Page Limits and Rate Limits

There is a maximum limit of 100 results per request. If you request a pagesize that is larger than 100, you will receive a response with no more than 100 results. Developers leveraging this API should keep the stability of the API and their own applications in mind. Individual users issuing more than 10 requests per second will experience degraded performance and may be blocked entirely.

blog_entries

GET /api/v1/blog_entries

Provides a list of all blog entries

Arguments
  • string fields GET (optional)
    A comma separated list of fields to get.
  • array parameters GET (optional)
    Filter parameters array such as parameters[title]="test"
  • int page GET (optional)
    The zero-based index of the page to get, defaults to 0.
  • int pagesize GET (optional)
    Number of records to get per page.
  • string sort GET (optional)
    Field to sort by.
  • string direction GET (optional)
    Direction of the sort. ASC or DESC.
Response Example

{
  "metadata": {
    "responseInfo": {
      "status": 200,
      "developerMessage": "OK"
    },
    "resultset": {
      "count": 1585,
      "pagesize": 2,
      "page": 0
    },
    "executionTime": 0.044137001037598
  },
  "results": [
    {
      "attachments": [
        
      ],
      "body": " Dear Friends and Colleagues,<\/p>\nI always look forward to the beginning of a month, and this one in particular, because it marks the close of one fiscal year and beginning of another.\u00a0 As of last Friday, we closed our books on FY 2011 and, despite the very late start to our peer review process because of the delayed budget cycle, succeeded in getting out all of our awards.\u00a0 This was a Herculean effort on the part of staff throughout the office \u2013 the budget and grants financial management staff, program staff, outreach, and all the administrative support.\u00a0 They all worked extraordinary hours to make this possible.<\/p>\nAs you know, our Office administers three formula programs and 18 discretionary programs.\u00a0 Formula programs, by definition, are not \u201ccompeted\u201d, but still require considerable work to process.\u00a0 Our discretionary programs, on the other hand, are competed, and this year the competition was intense.\u00a0 For some programs, the number of applications...",
      "changed": "1406769094",
      "component": [
        {
          "uuid": "cf33c69a-1eeb-4839-a870-0ac92f1cc356",
          "name": "Office on Violence Against Women"
        }
      ],
      "created": "1317655920",
      "date": "1317670320",
      "image": [
        
      ],
      "teaser": [
        
      ],
      "title": "Message from Director Carbon: October 2011",
      "topic": [
        
      ],
      "url": "http:\/\/www.justice.gov\/ovw\/blog\/message-director-carbon-october-2011",
      "uuid": "e7a19711-08a2-48bf-84af-8a280b2c100a",
      "vuuid": "3d6988b9-81d7-4720-a0f4-78e135592cb2"
    },
    {
      "attachments": [
        
      ],
      "body": " Dear Friends and Colleagues,<\/p>\nAs I write this message, it is a quiet Saturday morning in DC.\u00a0 I know (as you probably have observed) that I have missed my target of posting a message at the beginning of the month.\u00a0 I was, as I hope many of you were, enjoying an end-of-summer vacation with my husband and others in my family, a luxury these days.\u00a0 Living in DC and commuting home on weekends, when the opportunity allows, is a challenge, and I am ever mindful that my husband is making a big sacrifice for me to be here, and him there.\u00a0 He knows how grateful I am to him, but more importantly, knows how important this work is.\u00a0 And I couldn\u2019t be more reminded of that as we approach \u201cour\u201d anniversary, September 13th.<\/p>\nThree days from now we will be celebrating the 17th Anniversary of the historic passage of the Violence Against Women Act.\u00a0 Thanks to the unyielding focus of now Vice President Biden and many of his colleagues in Congress, a remarkable and groundbreaking piece of legislation has transformed our nation\u2019s response to the tragic crimes...",
      "changed": "1406769094",
      "component": [
        {
          "uuid": "cf33c69a-1eeb-4839-a870-0ac92f1cc356",
          "name": "Office on Violence Against Women"
        }
      ],
      "created": "1315064102",
      "date": "1315078502",
      "image": [
        
      ],
      "teaser": [
        
      ],
      "title": "Message from Director Carbon: September 2011",
      "topic": [
        
      ],
      "url": "http:\/\/www.justice.gov\/ovw\/blog\/message-director-carbon-september-2011",
      "uuid": "bdda0376-1ecd-419a-a220-3ee8ac3f04df",
      "vuuid": "7f853b33-02cb-4b0a-98c5-5a42d848f84a"
    }
  ]
}

GET /api/v1/blog_entries/[id]

Provides information on a specific blog entry

Arguments
  • int node_id URL
    The ID of the node to retrieve.
  • string fields GET (optional)
    A comma separated list of fields to get.
Response Example
{
  "metadata": {
    "responseInfo": {
      "status": 200,
      "developerMessage": "OK"
    },
    "resultset": {
      "count": 1,
      "pagesize": 1,
      "page": 0
    },
    "executionTime": 0.036761999130249
  },
  "results": [
    {
      "attachments": [
        
      ],
      "body": " Dear Friends and Colleagues,<\/p>\nI always look forward to the beginning of a month, and this one in particular, because it marks the close of one fiscal year and beginning of another.\u00a0 As of last Friday, we closed our books on FY 2011 and, despite the very late start to our peer review process because of the delayed budget cycle, succeeded in getting out all of our awards.\u00a0 This was a Herculean effort on the part of staff throughout the office \u2013 the budget and grants financial management staff, program staff, outreach, and all the administrative support.\u00a0 They all worked extraordinary hours to make this possible.<\/p>\nAs you know, our Office administers three formula programs and 18 discretionary programs.\u00a0 Formula programs, by definition, are not \u201ccompeted\u201d, but still require considerable work to process.\u00a0 Our discretionary programs, on the other hand, are competed, and this year the competition was intense.\u00a0 For some programs, the number of applications and amount of funds requested was 10 times that which was available.\u00a0 All of this makes it essential that the review process be thorough and objective, and this requires significant time and effort from staff and, in many instances, from expert reviewers like many of you.\u00a0\u00a0 This is a difficult process...",
      "changed": "1406769094",
      "component": [
        {
          "uuid": "cf33c69a-1eeb-4839-a870-0ac92f1cc356",
          "name": "Office on Violence Against Women"
        }
      ],
      "created": "1317655920",
      "date": "1317670320",
      "image": [
        
      ],
      "teaser": [
        
      ],
      "title": "Message from Director Carbon: October 2011",
      "topic": [
        
      ],
      "url": "http:\/\/www.justice.gov\/ovw\/blog\/message-director-carbon-october-2011",
      "uuid": "e7a19711-08a2-48bf-84af-8a280b2c100a",
      "vuuid": "3d6988b9-81d7-4720-a0f4-78e135592cb2"
    }
  ]
}

press_releases

GET /api/v1/press_releases

Provides a list of all press releases

Arguments
  • string fields GET (optional)
    A comma separated list of fields to get.
  • array parameters GET (optional)
    Filter parameters array such as parameters[title]="test"
  • int page GET (optional)
    The zero-based index of the page to get, defaults to 0.
  • int pagesize GET (optional)
    Number of records to get per page.
  • string sort GET (optional)
    Field to sort by.
  • string direction GET (optional)
    Direction of the sort. ASC or DESC.
Response Example
{
  "metadata": {
    "responseInfo": {
      "status": 200,
      "developerMessage": "OK"
    },
    "resultset": {
      "count": 9798,
      "pagesize": 2,
      "page": 0
    },
    "executionTime": 0.15431904792786
  },
  "results": [
    {
      "attachment": [
        
      ],
      "body": "\n\n\nWASHINGTON - INTERPOL Washington, the United States National Central Bureau (USNCB), announced the capture and return of Shilo Watts, 38, a United States citizen and resident of Atascosa County, Texas from Oman to the United States. Watts is wanted in Texas for charges of aggravated sexual assault of a minor, beginning when the minor was three years old and continuing over a prolonged period of time. In 2012, Watts fled the United States, resulting in the issuance of federal felony charge of unlawful flight to avoid prosecution.<\/p>\n<\/div>\n<\/div>\n\nIn April, INTERPOL Washington expedited the publication of an INTERPOL Red Notice, or international wanted persons notice, for Watts based on the charges in Texas. The Red Notice was disseminated via INTERPOL's network to its 190 member countries around the world. Based on the efforts of investigators from the U.S. Marshals Service (USMS) International Investigations Branch, USMS Western District of Texas, and the U.S. Department of State Bureau of Diplomatic Security Service, Watts' was traced to Oman where the INTERPOL Red Notice provided police with the authority to arrest and lawfully return Watts to the United States on May 15. Watts is currently in the custody of U.S. authorities and faces a maximum sentence of life in prison.<\/p>\nINTERPOL Washington Director Shawn Bray stated, \u201cThe capture of Shilo Watts is a great example of partnership between foreign, federal, state, and local law enforcement authorities, including the U.S. Marshals Service, Diplomatic Security Service, Office of International Affairs at the U.S. Department of Justice, and INTERPOL Washington. Through the close coordination of these authorities paired with the use of INTERPOL's international resources, the U.S. Marshals Service and the Diplomatic Security Service located, arrested and returned Watts to face justice in Texas in a matter of days.\u201d<\/p>\n<\/div>\n<\/div>\n\u00a0<\/p>\n",
      "changed": "1405004290",
      "component": [
        {
          "uuid": "b0edea30-11f3-41fe-b5db-607f8f1174c8",
          "name": "Interpol Washington"
        }
      ],
      "created": "1403814958",
      "date": "1368676800",
      "image": [
        
      ],
      "number": null,
      "secondary_teaser": null,
      "teaser": null,
      "title": "INTERPOL Red Notice facilitates arrest of fugitive sex offender wanted in Texas",
      "topic": [
        
      ],
      "url": "http:\/\/www.justice.gov\/interpol-washington\/pr\/interpol-red-notice-facilitates-arrest-fugitive-sex-offender-wanted-texas",
      "uuid": "8a0f7395-f556-45bf-8890-eeea2d0cbae0",
      "vuuid": "e0e512ab-5662-437b-937f-279a086b83b0"
    },
    {
      "attachment": [
        
      ],
      "body": "WASHINGTON - A joint investigation between the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the United States Coast Guard (USCG), and Interpol Washington (U.S. National Central Bureau) has led to the publication of the first-ever Interpol Purple Notice issued by the United States for a vessel believed to be engaged in illegal fishing activities.<\/p>\n\n\nAccording to the Purple Notice, the fishing vessel named 'Stellar' was sighted twice in May 2014 operating on the high seas of the North Pacific Ocean by the USCG. It appears to change its name, national registration and other identifying characteristics in order to hide illegal activity. 'Stellar' is suspected of engaging in illicit fisheries transshipment activities near the Russian Exclusive Economic Zone.<\/p>\n'Stellar' was last known to have arrived in the port of Busan, Korea on June 3, 2014. The USCG provided information to the Korean authorities regarding the suspicious activities of 'Stellar' and recommended the vessel be inspected for potential violations.<\/p>\n\u201cIllegal fisheries activity has a wide-ranging impact on the health and sustainability of the oceans fish stocks,\u201d said Bruce Buckson, Director of NOAA's Office of Law Enforcement. \u201cWe're pleased to be working with Interpol, its member agencies, and the U.S. Coast Guard to combat this type of activity. We expect this international effort will help level the playing field for U.S. domestic fishers.\u201d<\/p>\n\u201cI commend NOAA, the USCG and Interpol Washington's Economic Crimes Division representatives for their extraordinary efforts, collaboration and partnership during this investigation which has resulted in the first Interpol Purple Notice issued by U.S. law enforcement authorities,\u201d stated Interpol Washington Director Shawn A. Bray.<\/p>\nThe United States wishes to make all 189 other Interpol member countries aware of the suspected illegal operations of the fishing vessel 'Stellar' (also known as 'Sungari'). By raising awareness of this vessel's operations, member countries will be able to investigate possible violations of their laws and take appropriate enforcement measures should the vessel attempt to operate illegally in their waters or ports, or under their national jurisdiction.<\/p>\n<\/div>\n<\/div>\n\u00a0<\/p>\n",
      "changed": "1404997474",
      "component": [
        {
          "uuid": "b0edea30-11f3-41fe-b5db-607f8f1174c8",
          "name": "Interpol Washington"
        }
      ],
      "created": "1403814958",
      "date": "1402545600",
      "image": [
        
      ],
      "number": null,
      "secondary_teaser": null,
      "teaser": null,
      "title": "Joint Law Enforcement Effort Leads to Issuance of First Ever Interpol Purple Notice from the United States",
      "topic": [
        
      ],
      "url": "http:\/\/www.justice.gov\/interpol-washington\/pr\/joint-law-enforcement-effort-leads-issuance-first-ever-interpol-purple-notice",
      "uuid": "8cfcfd04-dfce-4151-af30-38cc8394c8f6",
      "vuuid": "c851a16e-069d-46d5-ad1f-eb7e56f031c6"
    }
  ]
}

GET /api/v1/press_releases/[id]

Provides information on a specific press release

Arguments
  • int node_id URL
    The ID of the node to retrieve.
  • string fields GET (optional)
    A comma separated list of fields to get.
Response Example
{
  "metadata": {
    "responseInfo": {
      "status": 200,
      "developerMessage": "OK"
    },
    "resultset": {
      "count": 1,
      "pagesize": 1,
      "page": 0
    },
    "executionTime": 0.016565084457397
  },
  "results": [
    {
      "attachment": [
        
      ],
      "body": "WASHINGTON - The United States has extradited Sulejman Mujagic, a citizen of Bosnia and Herzegovina and a resident of Utica, New York, to stand trial in Bosnia for charges relating to the torture and murder of one prisoner of war and the torture of another during the armed conflict in Bosnia.<\/p>\n\n\nActing Assistant Attorney General Mythili Raman of the Justice Department's Criminal Division, U.S. Attorney Richard S. Hartunian of the Northern District of New York, and U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) Director John Morton made the announcement.<\/p>\n\u201cThis extradition is the result of close cooperation between the U.S. and Bosnian authorities to bring alleged perpetrators of war crimes and torture in Bosnia to justice,\u201d said Acting Assistant Attorney General Raman.<\/p>\n\u201cThrough the coordinated efforts of many law enforcement agencies and prosecutors, Sulejman Mujagic will stand trial in a Bosnian court for the alleged murder of an unarmed soldier and the torture of a second soldier,\u201d said United States Attorney Hartunian. \u201cThis case is a reflection of our steadfast commitment to support the rights of crime victims - wherever they are.\u201d<\/p>\n\u201cFor the families who lost loved ones during the Bosnian war, justice has been a long time coming, but they can take some comfort in knowing that those responsible for this tragedy are now being held accountable for their crimes,\u201d said ICE Director John Morton. \u201cI applaud the outstanding work by Homeland Security Investigations (HSI) special agents in upstate New York, ICE's Human Rights Violators and War Crimes Center, and our partners at the Department of Justice and Bosnia and Herzegovina authorities. Thanks to their efforts, Sulejman Mujagic will now face justice for his actions. We will continue to work tirelessly to ensure our country does not serve as a safe haven for human rights violators and others who have committed heinous acts.\u201d<\/p>\nMujagic is being extradited to Bosnia to be tried for war crimes committed on or about March 6, 1995, during the armed conflict that followed the breakup of the former Yugoslavia. Bosnia has alleged that Mujagic, then a platoon commander in the Army of the Autonomous Province of Western Bosnia, summarily tortured and executed a disarmed Bosnian Army soldier and tortured a second soldier after the two prisoners had been captured by Mujagic and his men.<\/p>\nIn response to the Bosnian government's request for extradition pursuant to the extradition treaty currently in force between the United States and Bosnia, the U.S. Department of Justice filed a complaint in U.S. federal district court on Nov. 27, 2012, and HSI special agents arrested Mujagic the next day in Utica, New York, for purposes of extradition.<\/p>\nOn April 2, 2013, the federal district court in the Northern District of New York ruled that Mujagic was subject to extradition to Bosnia to stand trial for the murder and torture of the two unarmed victims. On May 31, 2013, Mujagic was delivered to Bosnian authorities and removed from the United States. The Office of the Cantonal Prosecutor of the Una-Sana Canton in Bihac is handling Mujagic's prosecution in Bosnia.<\/p>\nMujagic entered the United States in July 1997 and obtained status as a lawful permanent resident in March 2001. Mujagic does not retain U.S. citizenship.<\/p>\nThis case was investigated by HSI Buffalo, with assistance from the ICE Human Rights Violators and War Crimes Center and INTERPOL Washington. The case was handled by Trial Attorneys Ivana Nizich and Jay Bauer of the Human Rights and Special Prosecutions Section of the Justice Department's Criminal Division and Assistant U.S. Attorney Carla Freedman of the Northern District of New York. The extradition was handled collaboratively with Criminal Division Trial Attorneys Ken Harris, Marcus Busch and Terry Schubert of the Office of International Affairs.<\/p>\nThe case was a result of the close cooperation between the U.S. and Bosnian authorities, particularly the Ministry of Internal Affairs and the Office of the Public Prosecutor of the Una-Sana Canton in Bihac, Bosnia.<\/p>\n<\/div>\n<\/div>\n\u00a0<\/p>\n",
      "changed": "1405004132",
      "component": [
        {
          "uuid": "b0edea30-11f3-41fe-b5db-607f8f1174c8",
          "name": "Interpol Washington"
        }
      ],
      "created": "1403814958",
      "date": "1370232000",
      "image": [
        
      ],
      "number": null,
      "secondary_teaser": null,
      "teaser": null,
      "title": "Bosnian National Extradited to Stand Trial for Murder and Torture",
      "topic": [
        
      ],
      "url": "http:\/\/www.justice.gov\/interpol-washington\/pr\/bosnian-national-extradited-stand-trial-murder-and-torture",
      "uuid": "806d5f8c-31c5-46de-9c11-91122484b091",
      "vuuid": "0a59d0b6-27c0-4cfc-8865-ddf7a58a03a8"
    }
  ]
}

speeches

GET /api/v1/speeches

Provides a list of all speeches

Arguments
  • string fields GET (optional)
    A comma separated list of fields to get.
  • array parameters GET (optional)
    Filter parameters array such as parameters[title]="test"
  • int page GET (optional)
    The zero-based index of the page to get, defaults to 0.
  • int pagesize GET (optional)
    Number of records to get per page.
  • string sort GET (optional)
    Field to sort by.
  • string direction GET (optional)
    Direction of the sort. ASC or DESC.
Response Example

{
  "metadata": {
    "responseInfo": {
      "status": 200,
      "developerMessage": "OK"
    },
    "resultset": {
      "count": 1268,
      "pagesize": 2,
      "page": 0
    },
    "executionTime": 0.17992281913757
  },
  "results": [
    {
      "attachment": [
        
      ],
      "body": "\n   Thank you Judge Allegra for that kind introduction. Good afternoon ladies and gentlemen, and welcome to the Department of Justice\u2019s Great Hall. I am truly honored to be here with the Italian Historical Society of America. I should note that there is nothing I have done since I became the Associate Attorney General that has been of greater interest to my family. At the mention of the Italian Historical Society, my family has been wondering why C-Span isn't carrying this event. I am proud to be with you today, and thank you for making my Aunt Lucia's day. <\/p>\n   The Society and other Italian-American organizations have been honoring Charles Bonaparte for many years. The opportunity to participate in the Society\u2019s 50th<\/sup> annual ceremony commemorating Charles Joseph Bonaparte, a bold man and brilliant lawyer who dedicated his life to serving his country, is a humbling one, and it\u2019s not easy to know what more can be said about him. In a lot of settings, it\u2019s enough for a speaker to be a little bit entertaining and maybe leave folks knowing a little more than they did when they walked in the room. But Charles Bonaparte set a much higher standard. A man who was never lacking in self-confidence, Bonaparte was known to begin a speech by promising that listening to him attentively would make his listeners morally better for having done so.<\/p>\n   I know better than to make any promise that listening to me will make you morally better. And I lack what we could call Bonaparte\u2019s more \u201cdirect\u201d speaking style, as he was known to use whatever platform he was given to give speeches that his admirers have been described as \u201cbelligerent[]\u201d and \u201csavage,\u201d and \u2013 my favorite, and remember this is from an admirer \u2013 relied heavily on language that listeners found \u201cappall[ing].\u201d <\/p>\n   So while I can\u2019t promise that I can make anyone here morally better, I can at least promise to try to keep it clean. And although Bonaparte and I may have different speaking styles, we share a common and perhaps unusual heritage \u2013 Sicilian and Scottish. Perhaps some day some one will describe me as they described him \u2013 \u201ca truly fabulous compound of Sicilian brigand and Scotch bluenose[.]\u201d <\/p>\n   Usually when someone in my job gives a speech, we like to talk about what we\u2019re doing today at the Department of Justice. That\u2019s important, and I hope you\u2019ll indulge me. But I\u2019d like to give something of a different take on my usual speech along these lines. Usually, a talk from someone in my job involves reciting all of the unprecedented steps we\u2019re taking, and the new priorities we\u2019re implementing. Today, I\u2019d like to show how, in many ways, some of the most important efforts we\u2019ve got going aren\u2019t new at all. They\u2019re efforts that were priorities, too, of our 46th<\/sup> Attorney General, Charles Bonaparte.<\/p>\n   I\u2019d like to focus on a couple areas in particular. <\/p>\n   One of this Administration\u2019s primary law enforcement initiatives is in finding, fighting, and bringing to justice those who profit by defrauding the government and people who are working hard and trying to play by the rules. At the direction of President Obama, we at the Department of Justice have joined with partner agencies all across government, at a federal, state, and local level, to fight back against financial and other forms of fraud. Our Financial Fraud Enforcement Task Force is the broadest coalition of law enforcement, investigatory and regulatory agencies ever assembled to combat fraud. We\u2019re sharing information, coordinating efforts, and multiplying our forces, because people deserve a level playing field.<\/p>\n   And those who don\u2019t play by the rules are paying the price. To take one example, from one of our other signature anti-fraud efforts, in September of last year, we entered into the largest health care fraud settlement in the history of the Department of Justice: a $2.3 billion deal with a pharmaceutical company that had tried to profit by breaking the rules. <\/p>\n   Now, you see, I\u2019ve already done it: I\u2019ve touted today\u2019s DOJ as bringing you the broadest fraud-fighting coalition ever, and the biggest health care fraud settlement in history. But let me tell you the truth: We don't have anything on what Charles Bonaparte was doing a century ago.<\/p>\n   The economic threats of 1906, when Bonaparte became Attorney General, were the trusts that corporations had formed to restrain competition and keep wages low. Bonaparte insisted on ensuring that ordinary citizens had a chance against the malfeasance of the big institutions, and he initiated several investigations into some of the biggest corporations of the day \u2013 from Standard Oil to the American Tobacco Company and the Union Pacific Railroad. <\/p>\n   Bonaparte\u2019s reputation was well-known, and as an appointee of Teddy Roosevelt, these interests wouldn\u2019t have surprised anyone. One newspaper saw it right upon Bonaparte\u2019s appointment, and wrote that, \u201c[W]ith his natural hatred of vulgar and greedy rich men\u201d \u2013 and remember, Bonaparte himself was quite a patrician \u2013 \u201che will prove a terror to every trust magnate in the country . . . .\u201d <\/p>\n   Now, the threats that we\u2019re zeroing in on today with our Financial Fraud Enforcement Task Force aren\u2019t the same as the trusts that Bonaparte had in his sights, but what President Roosevelt saw in Bonaparte\u2019s leadership on these issues sets a legitimate example for us today: Roosevelt wrote to Bonaparte, \u201cYou have shown by what you have actually accomplished that the law is enforced against the wealthiest corporation, and the richest and most powerful manager or manipulator of that corporation, just as resolutely and fearlessly as against the humblest citizen.\u201d <\/p>\n   What I take from Bonaparte\u2019s work in those days is not that there is any particular joy to be gotten from slaying giants \u2013 though you do get the sense that Bonaparte was happy to slay whatever got in his way \u2013 but just a basic understanding that the giants have to be subject to the same rules as everybody else. We\u2019re a nation of laws. And when a giant, or anybody else, isn\u2019t following those rules or laws, it is often the Department of Justice\u2019s job to call them to account. <\/p>\n   Where did Bonaparte get this? I know one factor is that he had a strong, intelligent New England mother (something I share with him), who instilled in him a distaste for dishonesty and corruption. And from his early days, well before he became Attorney General, he was speaking and writing about corruption and fraud at every chance he got. These were life-long causes. When Bonaparte served on the Maryland Board of Elections Supervisors, he placed watchers at polling places to ensure that ballots remained secret, and along with his colleagues at the Baltimore Reform League, he helped design broad changes to the voting process to deter voter fraud. President Roosevelt brought Bonaparte in as Special Counsel to prosecute corruption and fraud in the postal service \u2013 and he was ruthless in his mission. As one Brooklyn reporter described him in a major corruption trial, \u201cAnyone who has sat in the courtroom as we have and watched that Baltimore aristocrat coldly dissect witnesses, will be glad that he never became rich by stealing from the post office.\u201d <\/p>\n   Bonaparte\u2019s efforts weren\u2019t going to win him any popularity contests. The postal service investigation led to 46 indictments against 33 people, including political appointees, a state senator, and the secretary of a political party \u2013 which is no way to make friends with the powerful. But again, it gets back to the tradition that is at the core of the Justice Department: The men and women who have made this Department part or all of their career do what they do not because it\u2019s popular, or because it will get them thank-you notes. We make our decisions by asking ourselves whether it\u2019s the right thing to do. Bonaparte and Roosevelt understood this, and in fact Bonaparte got a certain kind of perverse recognition for his efforts to clean up Wall Street. Bonaparte wrote a letter to President Roosevelt \u2013 apparently the President back then didn\u2019t carry a blackberry \u2013 and mentioned that the Wall Street tycoons were smearing him in the press, in an attempt to get rid of him as Attorney General. President Roosevelt wrote back, calling these public complaints a mark of Bonaparte\u2019s success. Roosevelt wrote, \u201cI think the Wall Street people have succeeded in establishing in the minds of the public at large far more effectually than would have been possible for you or myself, the conviction that your course has been such as to cause the gravest alarm to every corrupt man of great wealth.\u201d <\/p>\n   Now, I have said a fair bit about Bonaparte\u2019s vision of what the law, and the Department of Justice, can do to keep us living up to our promise. But Bonaparte took on an even deeper challenge, because he could see that while we might have a legal framework with the right rules, the legal system might not work for a person who couldn\u2019t even get his foot in the door. From the very beginning of Bonaparte\u2019s legal career, he represented litigants who were poor and unable to pay, and yet had claims that he believed were just. He took criminal cases where he believed the defendant was innocent and in need of his help. He represented an Italian-American accused of serious assault, despite the strong anti-Italian feeling during that time, and won an acquittal. At the time of his death, one lawyer said that for Bonaparte, \u201cNo call of the helpless or of the wronged ever found him deaf to its appeal, and the more desperate the situation, the more forlorn the client, the more strenuous was his effort and the more unsparing his fight to secure the rights he found jeopardized, or to enforce atonement for injuries inflicted.\u201d <\/p>\n   This desire to help the ordinary citizen continues to this day at the Department. Our re-invigorated Civil Rights Division upholds the civil and constitutional rights of all individuals, particularly some of the most vulnerable members of our society. This Division has been instrumental in many of our nation\u2019s battles to advance civil rights, from the desegregation of our nation\u2019s schools to the prosecution of hate crimes, from ensuring girls and women have equal opportunities in schools and the workplace to guaranteeing that individuals with disabilities can access publics services. And the Attorney General\u2019s Access to Justice Initiative, led by Professor Lawrence Tribe, is premised on the understanding that \u201cjustice for all\u201d cannot be achieved when the law, courts, and justice are inaccessible to many and often inscrutable to all. The Access to Justice Initiative seeks to improve the availability and quality of indigent defense \u2013 an issue the Attorney General has called a \u201ccrisis\u201d \u2013 and to focus with special care upon the legal needs of the most disadvantaged among us. I think Bonaparte would feel rewarded by how what we are doing here carries forward some of his own work in the legal profession. <\/p>\n<\/p>\n   I could go on. I could talk about the Attorney General\u2019s commitment to eliminating politics from any aspect of the civil service hiring system. And you\u2019d respond with stories of Bonaparte\u2019s lifelong crusade to reform the civil service, at all levels of government, with merit-based principles. <\/p>\n   I could talk about our own great Attorney General, Eric Holder, and our nominee for Deputy Attorney General, Jim Cole, both of whom came up through the Department\u2019s Public Integrity Section. And you\u2019d remind me of Bonaparte\u2019s great work on public corruption.<\/p>\n   And I could talk about how the Attorney General has insisted from day one that the Federal Bureau of Investigation, with all of its new national security missions, be as strong as it ever has in what he has called its traditional law enforcement missions. And you would note that, if you want to talk about the FBI\u2019s traditional missions, you had best start with the man who created it.<\/p>\n   I know that this audience already gets the point: With a motto like  \u2013 inspiration by example \u2013 you can see pretty clearly the ways in which today\u2019s Department of Justice is finding an example, an inspiration, in Charles Bonaparte. We like to think that we have learned a fair bit and made some progress since his days, and we are doing our best to carry things forward. But we can learn a lot from our past, and in particular from the career of our 46th<\/sup> Attorney General.<\/p>\n   Thank you. <\/p>\n<\/div>\n",
      "changed": "1410308545",
      "component": [
        {
          "uuid": "32feb4db-2ab2-425e-b321-7d944cf1767d",
          "name": "Office of the Associate Attorney General"
        }
      ],
      "created": "1410308545",
      "date": "1276070400",
      "image": [
        
      ],
      "location": {
        "country": "US",
        "administrative_area": "DC",
        "locality": "Washington",
        "postal_code": null,
        "thoroughfare": null
      },
      "teaser": null,
      "title": "Associate Attorney General Tom Perrelli Speaks Before the Italian Historical Society of America",
      "topic": [
        
      ],
      "url": "http:\/\/www.justice.gov\/asg\/speech\/associate-attorney-general-tom-perrelli-speaks-italian-historical-society-america",
      "uuid": "7358f077-2bc4-4097-b825-f708ab99e2de",
      "vuuid": "ee9fa750-86a3-4803-8f6e-3b054695ac5b"
    },
    {
      "attachment": [
        
      ],
      "body": "\nGood afternoon. My name is Tom Perrelli, and I am the Associate Attorney General of the United States. As the third ranking official at the Department of Justice, my responsibilities include overseeing our grant making programs for state, local and tribal law enforcement. That includes the Office on Violence Against Women, which administers critical funding to victim service providers and programs across the country.<\/p>\nI am honored to stand here with Senators Crapo, Whitehouse and Lieberman to shine a spotlight on the critical issue of teen dating violence. For the first time, this crime is being commemorated as \"National Teen Dating Violence Awareness and Prevention Month,\" instead of a week. This is no small feat, and I commend these Senators and their colleagues for its unanimous passage earlier this week. Finally, teen dating violence is being given parity among the other three crimes authorized as part of the Violence Against Women Act \u2013 or VAWA. And while I stand here in the hope that one day we will put an end to all four crimes \u2013 sexual assault, domestic violence, stalking and teen dating violence \u2013 the Department will use the month of February to raise awareness regarding teen dating violence and to provide opportunities for schools and communities to protect young people.<\/p>\nViolence against women and children is an issue I personally care deeply about, and it is one of the many areas where I believe that we are at a critical point to make a real and significant difference. This September marked t he 15 year anniversary of President Clinton signing VAWA into law. We at the Department have embarked on a year\u2019s worth of activities meant to raise public awareness, to make sure that survivors everywhere know that they have a place \u2013 and a voice \u2013 in this administration, and to build toward a future where teen dating violence, domestic abuse, sexual assault and stalking are eradicated.<\/p>\nBut this year cannot just be an anniversary \u2013 it must be a call to action, and that is how we at the Department are viewing it. We want to use this year to recommit ourselves to ending violence against women. Our government and this Department have a responsibility to speak out and act on issues of violence against women. This administration has committed itself to thinking outside the box \u2013 to bringing in new ideas, and new coalitions, to bring about change. It\u2019s time to examine what we\u2019ve done right, and more critically, what we\u2019ve done wrong. Far too many communities in the United States are affected by this issue. We are committed to working with federal, state, local and tribal partners to ensure that all communities \u2013 particularly those that have been chronically neglected \u2013 are given the resources and support they need.<\/p>\n\u00a0<\/p>\nViolence against women is the seed to so many other forms of violence, and continues to have devastating effects on entire communities. And teen dating violence affects our most vulnerable \u2013 our young children \u2013 many of whom do not know how to identify, prevent or report incidences of teen dating violence. We know that a child who feels threatened cannot thrive at school or at home. How can we encourage our children to strive for the best, when they are afraid of who will be at their locker when they get out of class, or what might be waiting for them as they walk home after school?<\/p>\nRecently, the Attorney General and Secretary Arne Duncan sponsored a conversation with the Boston teenagers and others from different parts of the country who work on promoting healthy relationships in their own communities. These kids were so impressive. In response to a question \"why should this be a top priority?,\" one student explained, \"You guys would be amazed at how much this stuff is intertwined,\" adding that kids can\u2019t do well in school when their outside lives are unhealthy. Work on the social and emotional parts of a child\u2019s life, she said, and academic success can follow.<\/p>\nWe must do better \u2013 and we must do this work together. We must involve our federal, state, local and tribal partners as well as individual communities. Communities must be involved in addressing the needs of our young people and holding offenders accountable. It cannot be the work of the Department of Justice alone, or the criminal justice system, or state government. Each community must take an active role in defining their response to stalking.<\/p>\nWe at the Department share a vision where men, women, boys, girls and communities can live in a world without the fear of violence. Today, we take another step towards raising awareness and the profile of teen dating violence. If we\u2019re going to do this, we are going to have to do it together. Thank you for taking yet another step in that commitment today.<\/p>\n\u00a0<\/p>\n<\/div>\n",
      "changed": "1412691317",
      "component": [
        {
          "uuid": "32feb4db-2ab2-425e-b321-7d944cf1767d",
          "name": "Office of the Associate Attorney General"
        },
        {
          "uuid": "cf33c69a-1eeb-4839-a870-0ac92f1cc356",
          "name": "Office on Violence Against Women"
        }
      ],
      "created": "1410308545",
      "date": "1264654800",
      "image": [
        
      ],
      "location": {
        "country": "US",
        "administrative_area": "DC",
        "locality": "Washington",
        "postal_code": "",
        "thoroughfare": ""
      },
      "teaser": null,
      "title": "Associate Attorney General Tom Perrelli Speaks at Teen Dating Violence Month Event",
      "topic": [
        
      ],
      "url": "http:\/\/www.justice.gov\/asg\/speech\/associate-attorney-general-tom-perrelli-speaks-teen-dating-violence-month-event",
      "uuid": "622d1a80-9cfd-4412-88bd-2ab77003542f",
      "vuuid": "50574f83-134f-4ad6-beac-1f2a9c15f53c"
    }
  ]
}

GET /api/v1/speeches/[id]

Provides information on a specific speech

Arguments
  • int node_id URL
    The ID of the node to retrieve.
  • string fields GET (optional)
    A comma separated list of fields to get.
Response Example

{
  "metadata": {
    "responseInfo": {
      "status": 200,
      "developerMessage": "OK"
    },
    "resultset": {
      "count": 1,
      "pagesize": 1,
      "page": 0
    },
    "executionTime": 0.059677124023438
  },
  "results": [
    {
      "attachment": [
        
      ],
      "changed": "1412691317",
      "created": "1410308545",
      "image": [
        
      ],
      "location": {
        "country": "US",
        "administrative_area": "DC",
        "locality": "Washington",
        "postal_code": "",
        "thoroughfare": ""
      },
      "pr_body": "\nGood afternoon. My name is Tom Perrelli, and I am the Associate Attorney General of the United States. As the third ranking official at the Department of Justice, my responsibilities include overseeing our grant making programs for state, local and tribal law enforcement. That includes the Office on Violence Against Women, which administers critical funding to victim service providers and programs across the country.<\/p>\nI am honored to stand here with Senators Crapo, Whitehouse and Lieberman to shine a spotlight on the critical issue of teen dating violence. For the first time, this crime is being commemorated as \"National Teen Dating Violence Awareness and Prevention Month,\" instead of a week. This is no small feat, and I commend these Senators and their colleagues for its unanimous passage earlier this week. Finally, teen dating violence is being given parity among the other three crimes authorized as part of the Violence Against Women Act \u2013 or VAWA. And while I stand here in the hope that one day we will put an end to all four crimes \u2013 sexual assault, domestic violence, stalking and teen dating violence \u2013 the Department will use the month of February to raise awareness regarding teen dating violence and to provide opportunities for schools and communities to protect young people.<\/p>\nViolence against women and children is an issue I personally care deeply about, and it is one of the many areas where I believe that we are at a critical point to make a real and significant difference. This September marked t he 15 year anniversary of President Clinton signing VAWA into law. We at the Department have embarked on a year\u2019s worth of activities meant to raise public awareness, to make sure that survivors everywhere know that they have a place \u2013 and a voice \u2013 in this administration, and to build toward a future where teen dating violence, domestic abuse, sexual assault and stalking are eradicated.<\/p>\nBut this year cannot just be an anniversary \u2013 it must be a call to action, and that is how we at the Department are viewing it. We want to use this year to recommit ourselves to ending violence against women. Our government and this Department have a responsibility to speak out and act on issues of violence against women. This administration has committed itself to thinking outside the box \u2013 to bringing in new ideas, and new coalitions, to bring about change. It\u2019s time to examine what we\u2019ve done right, and more critically, what we\u2019ve done wrong. Far too many communities in the United States are affected by this issue. We are committed to working with federal, state, local and tribal partners to ensure that all communities \u2013 particularly those that have been chronically neglected \u2013 are given the resources and support they need.<\/p>\n\u00a0<\/p>\nViolence against women is the seed to so many other forms of violence, and continues to have devastating effects on entire communities. And teen dating violence affects our most vulnerable \u2013 our young children \u2013 many of whom do not know how to identify, prevent or report incidences of teen dating violence. We know that a child who feels threatened cannot thrive at school or at home. How can we encourage our children to strive for the best, when they are afraid of who will be at their locker when they get out of class, or what might be waiting for them as they walk home after school?<\/p>\nRecently, the Attorney General and Secretary Arne Duncan sponsored a conversation with the Boston teenagers and others from different parts of the country who work on promoting healthy relationships in their own communities. These kids were so impressive. In response to a question \"why should this be a top priority?,\" one student explained, \"You guys would be amazed at how much this stuff is intertwined,\" adding that kids can\u2019t do well in school when their outside lives are unhealthy. Work on the social and emotional parts of a child\u2019s life, she said, and academic success can follow.<\/p>\nWe must do better \u2013 and we must do this work together. We must involve our federal, state, local and tribal partners as well as individual communities. Communities must be involved in addressing the needs of our young people and holding offenders accountable. It cannot be the work of the Department of Justice alone, or the criminal justice system, or state government. Each community must take an active role in defining their response to stalking.<\/p>\nWe at the Department share a vision where men, women, boys, girls and communities can live in a world without the fear of violence. Today, we take another step towards raising awareness and the profile of teen dating violence. If we\u2019re going to do this, we are going to have to do it together. Thank you for taking yet another step in that commitment today.<\/p>\n\u00a0<\/p>\n<\/div>\n",
      "pr_component": [
        {
          "uuid": "32feb4db-2ab2-425e-b321-7d944cf1767d",
          "name": "Office of the Associate Attorney General"
        },
        {
          "uuid": "cf33c69a-1eeb-4839-a870-0ac92f1cc356",
          "name": "Office on Violence Against Women"
        }
      ],
      "pr_date": "1264654800",
      "pr_teaser": null,
      "pr_topic": [
        
      ],
      "title": "Associate Attorney General Tom Perrelli Speaks at Teen Dating Violence Month Event",
      "url": "http:\/\/www.justice.gov\/asg\/speech\/associate-attorney-general-tom-perrelli-speaks-teen-dating-violence-month-event",
      "uuid": "622d1a80-9cfd-4412-88bd-2ab77003542f",
      "vuuid": "50574f83-134f-4ad6-beac-1f2a9c15f53c"
    }
  ]
}

vacancy_announcements

GET /api/v1/vacancy_announcements

Provides a list of all vacancy annoucements

Arguments
  • string fields GET (optional)
    A comma separated list of fields to get.
  • array parameters GET (optional)
    Filter parameters array such as parameters[title]="test"
  • int page GET (optional)
    The zero-based index of the page to get, defaults to 0.
  • int pagesize GET (optional)
    Number of records to get per page.
  • string sort GET (optional)
    Field to sort by.
  • string direction GET (optional)
    Direction of the sort. ASC or DESC.
Response Example

{
  "metadata": {
    "responseInfo": {
      "status": 200,
      "developerMessage": "OK"
    },
    "resultset": {
      "count": 391,
      "pagesize": 2,
      "page": 0
    },
    "executionTime": 0.082199096679688
  },
  "results": [
    {
      "about_office": "The United States Attorney's Office (USAO), Southern District of New York (SDNY), is seeking experienced attorneys for Assistant United States Attorney (AUSA) positions in one of the largest USAOs in the country, with its main office in lower Manhattan and a branch office located in White Plains, NY. The SDNY includes New York, Bronx, Dutchess, Orange, Putnam, Rockland, Sullivan, and Westchester counties. AUSAs in the Office's Criminal Division prosecute violations of federal criminal law encompassing an incredibly wide range of areas, including terrorism, international narcotics, organized crime, violent crime, securities and commodities crime, complex financial and health care fraud, cyber-crime, and public corruption. Similarly, the Civil Division represents the interests of the United States in an extraordinarily diverse array of cases. In affirmative cases, Civil Division AUSAs investigate and prosecute health care fraud, mortgage fraud, and labor racketeering cases, and also enforce the federal civil rights, environmental, and tax laws. On the defensive side, Civil Division AUSAs represent federal agencies in a broad spectrum of cases brought against the United States, its agencies and its employees.<\/p>\nAn AUSA is assigned to either the Criminal or the Civil Division.<\/p>\n",
      "application_process": "Applications packages are available at the following site:...",
      "body": "AUSAs have the opportunity to represent the interests of the United States in the United District Court for the Southern District of New York and the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit and, in performing this important public service, to exercise responsibility that is unparalleled in any other job that a litigator might undertake. AUSAs immediately are assigned a challenging docket of cases in any of several units within each Division.<\/p>\nLocation<\/u>: New York, NY and White Plains, NY.<\/p>\n",
      "changed": "1400269692",
      "created": "1399914662",
      "deadline": null,
      "hiring_office": null,
      "hiring_org": {
        "uuid": "0bc45cf8-7ef2-4380-b3c5-9805c825a59b",
        "name": "USAO Southern District of New York"
      },
      "job_id": "14-SDNY-AUSA-01",
      "location": {
        "country": "US",
        "administrative_area": "NY",
        "locality": "New York",
        "postal_code": "10007",
        "thoroughfare": ""
      },
      "num_positions": null,
      "position": "attorney",
      "practice_area": "oarm-civilliti",
      "qualifications": "Applicants must possess a J.D. degree, be an active member of the bar (any jurisdiction) and have at least one to two years of post-J.D. experience; possess superior oral and written communication skills, as well as strong character, judgment, and interpersonal skills; have demonstrated the capacity to function, with minimal guidance, in a highly demanding environment.<\/p>\nUnited States citizenship is required.<\/p>\nType of Position<\/u>: All initial attorney appointments to the Department of Justice are made on a 14-month (temporary) basis pending favorable adjudication of a background investigation.<\/p>\n",
      "relocation_expenses": "Relocation expenses will not be paid.",
      "salary": "Assistant United States Attorneys' pay is administratively determined based, in part, on the number years of professional attorney experience.",
      "title": "Assistant United States Attorney",
      "travel": "Some travel both nation-wide and international may be necessary.",
      "url": "http:\/\/www.justice.gov\/legal-careers\/job\/us-department-justice-assistant-united-states-attorney-united-states-attorneys",
      "uuid": "168c3b32-e16d-42c6-b25c-610e96aae7f5",
      "vuuid": "7f62346d-c12d-4f98-95e3-41569bc632f8"
    },
    {
      "about_office": "",
      "application_process": "",
      "body": "Opens February 7, 2014 <\/p>\n\nAbout the Office<\/u>: The United States Attorney's Office prosecutes federal offenses and represents the United States in civil cases. The Northern District of New York is comprised of 32 counties in upstate New York, a territory comparable to the combined area of Vermont, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, and Connecticut. We have staffed offices in Syracuse (headquarters), Albany, Binghamton, and Plattsburgh. Our Assistant U.S. Attorneys appear before federal judges in those cities and Utica. (Auburn, Malone, and Watertown also are designated sites for court). Our Syracuse office is currently staffed by 17 attorneys and 27 support personnel, our Albany office is staffed by 14 attorneys and 19 support personnel, our Plattsburgh office is staffed by 3 attorneys and 2 support personnel, and our Binghamton office is staffed by 2 attorneys and 1 support personnel.<\/p>\nPlease indicate on your cover...",
      "changed": "1401222132",
      "created": "1399914662",
      "deadline": null,
      "hiring_office": null,
      "hiring_org": {
        "uuid": "27753e0f-7996-43da-9500-eee8496e1a5a",
        "name": "USAO Northern District of New York"
      },
      "job_id": "Vacancy Announcement No. 14-NDNY02  ",
      "location": {
        "country": "US",
        "administrative_area": "NY",
        "locality": "Syracuse",
        "postal_code": "13261",
        "thoroughfare": ""
      },
      "num_positions": null,
      "position": "attorney",
      "practice_area": "oarm-immigration",
      "qualifications": "",
      "relocation_expenses": null,
      "salary": "Assistant United States Attorneys' pay is administratively determined based, in part, on the number years of professional attorney experience.  The range of basic pay is $51,403 - $151,660 (including 14.16% locality pay).",
      "title": "Assistant United States Attorney ",
      "travel": "Employment will require occasional travel to court at one of the designated sites in our District.  Other occasional travel within and\/or outside the District is anticipated.",
      "url": "http:\/\/www.justice.gov\/legal-careers\/job\/us-department-justice-assistant-united-states-attorney-united-states-attorneys-3",
      "uuid": "90ddf704-0567-4738-a56d-4e84bfdf1f5c",
      "vuuid": "1fb448be-3aa1-4930-a66d-1b572d285905"
    }
  ]
}

GET /api/v1/vacancy_announcements/[id]

Provides information on a specific vacancy announcement

Arguments
  • int node_id URL
    The ID of the node to retrieve.
  • string fields GET (optional)
    A comma separated list of fields to get.
Response Example
{
   "metadata":{
      "responseInfo":{
         "status":200,
         "developerMessage":"OK"
      },
      "resultset":{
         "count":1,
         "pagesize":1,
         "page":0
      },
      "executionTime":0.056050062179565
   },
   "results":[
      {
         "about_office":"<p>The United States Attorney's Office serves as the principal litigator for its judicial district and is responsible for coordinating multiple agency investigations within the district. The United States Attorney has the responsibility and authority to prosecute violations of federal criminal statutes, defend the government in civil action, seek the enforcement of a variety of civil enforcement statutes, and institute proceedings for the collection of fines and penalties among other things.</p>\n",
         "application_process":"<p>Cover letter, resume, official law school transcript, legal writing sample, dates when available, and telephone number(s) where student can be reached in the day and evenings.</p>\n<p>USAO Middle District of Alabama<br />\nHuman Resources Office<br />\n131 Clayton Street Montgomery, AL 36104<br />\nATTN: Retta Goss, Administrative Officer<br />\nTelephone:(334) 223-7280<br />\nFax:(334) 223-7524</p>\n<p>Application Deadlines:\u00a0Fall: May 1<br />\n\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0 \u00a0Spring: September 1<br />\n\u00a0</p>\n",
         "body":"<p>Typical assignments will include assisting with all facets of case preparation including: researching legal issues, drafting/writing motions and responses and various pleadings, providing trial support to Assistant United States Attorneys, interviewing witnesses, and assembling exhibits for trial.</p>\n<p>Minimum Weeks Required: 8 weeks</p>\n<p>Internship Location:\u00a0 Mobile</p>\n",
         "changed":"1403784739",
         "created":"1399914723",
         "deadline":null,
         "hiring_office":null,
         "hiring_org":{
            "uuid":"8ac879f8-0a2d-4240-8209-9403ff038743",
            "name":"USAO Middle District of Alabama"
         },
         "job_id":null,
         "location":{
            "country":"US",
            "administrative_area":"AL",
            "locality":"Montgomery",
            "postal_code":"36104",
            "thoroughfare":""
         },
         "num_positions":"2",
         "position":"law_student_volunteer_academic_year",
         "practice_area":"oarm-crimelaw",
         "qualifications":"<p>First-year (second semester), second- and third-year law students are eligible to apply. Law school graduates are not eligible for summer positions. Must be a U.S. citizen and will be subjected to a security background investigation due to the sensitive nature of the work performed by the office.</p>\n",
         "relocation_expenses":null,
         "salary":"Work-study credit may be possible.",
         "title":"Law Student Volunteer, Academic Year",
         "travel":"None",
         "url":"http://www.justice.gov/legal-careers/job/usao-middle-district-alabama",
         "uuid":"f46e1378-5a69-4cd0-9ff8-07bff18a9240",
         "vuuid":"13188ea4-cc48-4b29-9369-6bf1187a7ece"
      }
   ]
}