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Justice News

Department of Justice
U.S. Attorney’s Office
Northern District of Illinois

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday, June 24, 2016

Rockford Man Charged with the Robbery of Rockford Banks and a Coin and Stamp Store

ROCKFORD — A local man was indicted June 21, 2016 by a federal grand jury in Rockford, Ill. on bank robbery, robbery affecting interstate commerce and firearm charges. 

DAVID J. SANDERS, 33, was charged with one count of attempted bank robbery, two counts of bank robbery, one count of robbery affecting interstate commerce, one count of using and carrying a firearm in relation to a crime of violence, and one count of possessing a firearm as a convicted felon.

The indictment alleges that on May 31, 2016, Sanders attempted to commit a robbery of the BMO Harris Bank, 2510 S. Alpine Rd., Rockford, Ill.   The indictment further alleges that on May 31, 2016, Sanders robbed the BMO Harris Bank, 1480 S. Alpine Rd., Rockford, Ill and that he obtained $2,260 from bank employees during that robbery.  The indictment further alleges on June 11, 2016 Sanders robbed Rockford Coin and Stamps, 4402 Center Ter., Rockford, Ill. while using and carrying a firearm during a crime of violence and that he obtained $500 and a Remington shotgun from Rockford Coin and Stamps employees during that robbery.  The indictment further alleges that between June 11, 2016 and June 14, 2016, Sanders possessed a firearm as a convicted felon.  The indictment further alleges that on June 14, 2016, Sanders robbed PNC Bank, 4615 E. State St., Rockford, Ill. and that he obtained $3,010 from bank employees during that robbery. 

Each count of attempted bank robbery, bank robbery and robbery affecting interstate commerce carries a maximum penalty of up to 20 years in prison, up to 3 years of supervised release following imprisonment, a fine of up to $250,000, and full restitution.  The charge of using and carrying a firearm in furtherance of a crime of violence carries a mandatory minimum sentence of 7 years, maximum penalty of up to life imprisonment, up to 5 years of supervised release following imprisonment, and a fine of up to $250,000.  The sentence imposed for this charge must be consecutive to any other sentence imposed.  The charge of possessing a firearm as a convicted felon carries a maximum penalty of 10 years, up to 3 years of supervised release, and a fine of up to $250,000.  If convicted, the court must impose a reasonable sentence under federal sentencing statutes and the advisory United States Sentencing Guidelines.

Sanders has been in custody since his arrest on June 14, 2016 and pleaded not guilty during his arraignment yesterday before U.S. Magistrate Judge Iain D. Johnston.  Sanders was previously ordered to be held in federal custody pending trial.  Sanders is next scheduled to appear before U.S. Magistrate Judge Johnson for a status hearing on Aug. 16, 2016 at 11:00 a.m.

The public is reminded that an indictment contains only charges and is not evidence of guilt.  The defendant is presumed innocent and is entitled to a fair trial at which the government has the burden of proving guilt beyond a reasonable doubt.

The indictment was announced by Zachary T. Fardon, United States Attorney for the Northern District of Illinois; Michael J. Anderson, Special Agent-in-Charge of the Chicago Office of Federal Bureau of Investigation; and Dan O’Shea, Chief of the Rockford Police Department.  The investigation was conducted under the auspices of the FBI Safe Streets Task Force, which includes representatives from the FBI, ATF, Loves Park Police Department, Winnebago County Sheriff’s Department, and Rockford Police Department.

The government is represented by Assistant U.S. Attorney Joseph C. Pedersen.

Topic: 
Violent Crime
Updated June 24, 2016